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Youth Topics Newsletter August 14th Edition| Newsletter| Alexandria Center for Children and Families

Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families, Department of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria. It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services.

Subscribe here. Make inquiries here. Youth Topics is posted online here.

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In the August 14 Edition:

Events
Titan Takeover Teen Night (August 14)
ACAP and SAPCA Youth Leadership Conference (August 17-19)
School Every Day: The Importance of Attendance for Student Success (August 18)
Dismantling the School to Prison Pipeline Through Trauma Informed Approaches (August 20)
Extra Fun Weeks (August 17-21, August 24-28)
Alexandria Multicultural Fest (September 12)
Partnership for a Healthier Alexandria Community Meeting (September 29)
Save the Date: Toast to Hope (November 7)

Careers/Volunteerism
Teen Travel Writing Scholarships
Scholarships with September 2015 Deadlines
Psychological Distress in Youth & How to Help
Parent Leadership Training Institute
Barry & Marie Lipman Family Prize
Career Development Grants for Women
Amelia Earhart Fellowship
Pre- and Postdoctoral Training Awards
Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program
Frank Prize for Research in Public Interest Communications
Mid-Career Fellowship in Preservation/Architecture
Support for Early Career Scholars in China Studies
Collaborative Scholarly Research Fellowships
Luce Foundation Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
United Way Community Leaders Panel Survey Results: Volunteering

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities

Research & Resources
Arlington, Alexandria Residents to Consider Sharing a Pool, Fitness Center
ACPS Sees Significant Growth in SOL Test Scores
He Mentored Youths and Won a College Scholarship. Then He Joined a Gang
Parent Connection Resource Guide
Parenting Classes by SCAN
SCAN Fee-For-Service Workshops

Education
New Orleans Reforms Boost Student Performance
Missouri Legislator Requests Justice Department Investigation of Administration of Education in St. Louis
Washington State Fined $100,000 Per Day for Education Funding Failure
International Baccalaureate Saw Rapid Growth in High-Poverty Schools
The Next MacGyver
Gender Gaps at the Math Olympiad: Where Are the Girls?
‘Code: Debugging the Gender Gap’
These Girls are the Coders of the Future, and They’re Already Solving Problems
Music Class May Help Students’ Language Skills
Storytelling Skills in Black Children Tied to Early Literacy
Hawaii to Expand Preschool Offerings Through Charters
Save the Children Crusades to Make Preschool a Top-Tier Campaign Issue
The Hidden Cost of Suspension – A Story Map
Kentucky Restraint Lawsuit
Rethinking Discipline Online Discussion
Advancing School Discipline Reform
National HIV Strategy Includes Call for Effective Sex Education in Schools
High School Graduation and Coursework: Class of 2013
‘First and 17’
Former TV Anchor Campbell Brown to Launch Education News Site
School Librarians Want More Tech – And Bandwidth

Youth Well-Being
State of the World’s Mothers 2015: The Urban Disadvantage
State of America’s Babies: 2015
2015’s Best and Worst States for Underprivileged Children
The Surprising Number of Parents Scaling Back at Work to Care for Kids
When Can Parents Let Children Be Alone?
New Child Welfare Bill Focuses on Keeping Families Together
Teens, Technology and Friendships
Trends in Television Food Advertising to Young People: 2014 Update
Since Michael Brown, Police Shot and Killed 53 Teenagers. Who Were They?
Game Changers Reaches Middle School Boys With Message About Violence Against Women
Mindfulness Study to Track Effect of Meditation on 7,000 Teenagers
Cutting To Cope
Say It Out Loud
Foundations of Behavioral Health: Partnering to Serve the Mental Health Needs of Children in Child Welfare
Using Brain Science to Boost Social and Emotional Skills
The Relationship between Cross-Age Teaching and Social & Emotional Learning
Latino Children a Focus of USA Swimming Foundation’s 2015 Campaign
Changes to Federal After-school, Summer Meals Programs Sought

Juvenile Justice
Illinois Reforming Juvenile Justice System
Studying Deterrence Among High-Risk Adolescents
Model Programs Guide

Workshops & Webinars
English Language Learning During the Out-of-School Time (August 19)
College Access Mentoring: Preparing Your Students for Graduation and Beyond (August 20)
Strategies for Building Meaningful Relationships with Youth (August 26)
Police, Youth, and Community Relations: Improving Outcomes and Restoring Trust through Youth Voice (August 26)
Integrating Employability Skills into Everyday Instruction (September 2)
Webinar Series on Human Trafficking (On Demand)

Events

Titan Takeover Teen Night (August 14)
The KeepIt360 Club of the Alexandria Campaign on Adolescent Pregnancy and the Above the Influence Club of the Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition of Alexandria are hosting a Teen Night at Cora Kelly Recreation Center (25 W. Reed Ave.) from 7-10 p.m. Text “Titan” to 30644 or email Kim Hurley to attend.

ACAP and SAPCA Youth Leadership Conference (August 17-19)
ACAP and SAPCA will be hosting the fourth annual Youth Leadership Conference from 10am-5pm at the First Baptist Church (2932 King Street). The conference is free for high-school aged youth (including rising ninth graders) and will include snacks and lunch each day. Youth who attend the conference will have the opportunity to expand their leadership skills, learn about financial literacy, and practice networking. Register online, email the registration form to Lisette Torres, or mail it to ACAP (421 King Street, Suite 400, Alexandria, VA 22314).

School Every Day: The Importance of Attendance for Student Success (August 18)
Education Nation and America’s Promise Alliance are hosting the live Parent Toolkit Twitter chat to discuss the importance of attendance for student success, and how to engage parents in reducing absenteeism. Join the 7 p.m. chat by using hashtag #ToolkitTalk.

Dismantling the School to Prison Pipeline Through Trauma Informed Approaches (August 20)
The “school to prison pipeline” describes a widespread pattern of children being pushed out of school and into the criminal justice system. A community forum at the David A. Clarke School of Law (Room 518, 4340 Connecticut Avenue N.W.) from 6-8 p.m. will profile efforts now underway in the District of Columbia to dismantle the school to prison pipeline by using trauma-informed and resilience-building approaches. The event is free and open to the public; RSVP online.

Extra Fun Weeks (August 17-21, August 24-28)
The Out of School Time Program of the Department of Recreation, Parks & Cultural Activities is hosting an additional two weeks of summer fun for youth entering grades 1-8 in Fall 2015 at the following locations: Charles Barrett (1115 Martha Custis Drive, 703.746.5551); Charles Houston (901 Wythe Street, 703.746.5552); Cora Kelly (25 W. Reed Avenue, 703.746.5554); Mount Vernon (2701 Commonwealth Avenue, 703.746.5556); Patrick Henry (4643 Taney Avenue, 703.746.5557); and William Ramsay (5650 Sanger Avenue, 703.746.5558). The fee is $75 per week and an additional $39 per week for Before Care (7 – 9 a.m.). Financial assistance is available with appropriate documentation. Registration packets are available at each recreation center, at the Lee Center (1108 Jefferson Street) or online.

Alexandria Multicultural Fest (September 12)
The event will celebrate the many historic and cultural treasures of the region’s past while embracing the new opportunities for the future. There will be live entertainment, local performers, children’s interactive games and crafts, food, face painting and various vendors. Festivities are from 12 – 4 p.m. at Conservatory Center at Four Mile Run Park (4109 Mt. Vernon Avenue). For additional information, contact Cisco Fabian (703.746.5465) or Elsie Akinbobola (703.746.5475).

Partnership for a Healthier Alexandria Community Meeting (September 29)
Play a role in improving the health of the Alexandria community by participating in a discussion regarding the implementation of the Community Health Improvement Plan. The meeting will take place from 8:15 – 11 a.m. at 2525 Mount Vernon Avenue. Contact the Partnership for a Healthier Alexandria for additional information.

Save the Date: Toast to Hope (November 7)
Celebrate SCAN’s impact and raise funds for the year ahead at its annual event from 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. at UUCA (4444 Arlington Blvd, Arlington).

Careers/Volunteerism

Teen Travel Writing Scholarships
The Family Travel Forum and the Society of American Travel Writers are accepting applications for a scholarship program designed to encourage teens between the ages of 13 and 18 to share their travel experiences in words and images. To be considered, applicants must submit a travel blog of no more than six hundred words. All entries must also contain at least one photo, a piece of digital artwork, or a video. The first place winner will receive a $1,000 cash grant while second and third place winners will receive cash prizes of $500 and $250, respectively. In addition, the work of twenty honorable mention nominees will be rewarded with travel gifts and all the top blog posts will be posted on the website of Family Travel Forum. Submissions must be received by September 14.

Scholarships with September 2015 Deadlines
Alistproduced by JLV College Counseling features 44 college scholarships and contests with September 2015 deadlines.

Psychological Distress in Youth & How to Help 
Nearly one in five teens suffers from a mental disorder such as depression or anxiety, and suicide remains the third leading cause of death in this age group. The 45-60 minute online training is designed to prepare adults to recognize when a young person is exhibiting signs of psychological distress and includes role-play conversations for building skills to talk with students. There is an additional training that helps adults best support LGBTQ youth. The opportunity ends September 30. Access is provided to all three training modules once an account/login is created.

Parent Leadership Training Institute
The goal of the Parent Leadership Training Institute (PTLI) is to expand the capacity of parents to be change agents, facilitate systems change, and increase the utilization of parents in policy and process decisions. The free training, includes a retreat to develop group communication, ten weeks of classes on leadership and public speaking, and ten weeks learning about public policy and budgets. PTLI is currently recruiting 25 parents for the class that begins in the fall. Apply onlineor contact Adrienne Fikes, Director (703.739.0233).

Barry & Marie Lipman Family Prize
Theaward recognizes and amplifies the work of organizations devoted to positive social impact and creating sustainable solutions to significant social and economic challenges. The ultimate goal is to spread the global lessons found in local success. The winning organization will receive a $250,000 unrestricted cash prize while the other two finalists will each receive $25,000. The deadline is August 31.

Career Development Grants for Women
Theprogram of the American Association of University Women provides funding to women who hold a bachelor’s degree and are preparing to advance or change careers or re-enter the workforce. Grants of up to $12,000 will be awarded to provide support for course work beyond a bachelor’s degree, including a master’s degree, second bachelor’s degree, certification program, or specialized training in technical or professional fields. The deadline for applying is December 15.

Amelia Earhart Fellowship
Zonta (a global service organization of executives in business and the professions working to advance the status of women) is inviting applications from women of any nationality pursuing a Ph.D. for its Amelia Earhart Fellowship. The $10,000 fellowship is awarded to thirty-five women each year and aims to help talented women pursuing advanced studies in the typically male-dominated fields of aerospace-related sciences and engineering achieve their educational goals. The fellowship enables these women to invest in state-of-the-art computers to conduct their research, purchase expensive books and resource materials, and participate in specialized studies around the globe. Women of any nationality pursuing a Ph.D./doctoral degree who demonstrate a superior academic record in the field of aerospace-related sciences or aerospace-related engineering are eligible to apply. Applicants must be registered in a full-time Ph.D./doctoral program when funds are received in September and must not graduate before April.

Pre- and Postdoctoral Training Awards
The Autism Science Foundation is inviting applications from graduate students, medical students, and postdoctoral fellows interested in pursuing careers in basic and clinical research relevant to autism spectrum disorders. The proposed training must be scientifically linked to autism and may be broadened to include training in a closely related area of scientific research. The one-yearawardsinclude $25,000 for pre-doctoral and medical students and $35,000 for postdoctoral students. Applications must be received by November 13.

Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program
The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University is accepting applications for the 2016-17 Fellowship Program. One-year fellowship grants of up to $75,000 ($37,500 for one semester) will be awarded to individuals working in the creative arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, or mathematics to pursue projects within their respective field. Fellows receive office or studio space and access to libraries and other resources of Harvard University Visual, film, and video artists may apply for either one or two semesters. The deadline for individual applications in the creative arts, humanities, and social sciences is September 24, 2015. For applications in the natural sciences and mathematics, the deadline is October 15, 2015.

Frank Prize for Research in Public Interest Communications
The University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications will be awarding a single $10,000 prize and two $1,500 prizes for research that informs and drives better practice in the field of public interest communications Research may come from any discipline and will be judged by its relevance to using communications to drive social change. All research should have been completed within the past two years and must be submitted by November 6.

Mid-Career Fellowship in Preservation/Architecture
The James Marston Fitch Charitable Foundation is accepting applications for three fellowships. The James Marston Fitch Mid-Career Fellowship will award grants of up to $15,000 to one or two mid-career professionals who have an academic background, professional experience, and an established identity in one or more of the following: historic preservation, architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, environmental planning, architectural history, and/or the decorative arts. The Samuel H. Kress Mid-Career Fellow awards research grants of up to $15,000 to one mid-career professional whose research project, in the context of historic preservation in the United States, relates to the appreciation, interpretation, preservation, study, and teaching of European art, architecture, and related disciplines, from antiquity to the early 19thcentury. The Richard L. Blinder Award provides for up to $15,000 to an architect holding a professional degree or a valid license to practice architecture for a proposal exploring the preservation of an existing structure, complex of buildings, or genre of building type through addition, renovation, or other means. The deadline for applications is October 15.

Support for Early Career Scholars in China Studies
Aprogram of the Henry Luce Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies, the Luce Foundation/ ACLS Program in China Studies seeks to maintain the vitality of China studies in the United States through fellowships and grants, primarily for scholars early in their career. The program offers three competitions: Pre-dissertation Summer Travel Grants for Research in China (provides doctoral candidates with $5,000 for costs associated with three to four months in China gaining familiarity with work under way in archives and field sites in China); Postdoctoral Fellowships (provide up to $50,000 to scholars preparing their Ph.D. dissertation research for publication or in embarking on new research projects); and Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants (up to $15,000 to provide opportunities for scholars of different disciplines to share in-depth investigation of texts that are an essential point of entry to Chinese periods, traditions, communities, or events in contemporary or historical times). Applications must be submitted by November 4. 

Collaborative Scholarly Research Fellowships
The aim of the program of the American Council of Learned Societies is to offer small teams of two or more scholars the opportunity to collaborate intensively on a single, substantive project. The fellowships are for a total period of up to 24 months and provide up to $60,000 in salary replacement for each collaborator as well as up to $20,000 in collaboration funds (which may be used for travel, materials, or research assistance). To be eligible, a project must involve at least two scholars who are each seeking salary-replacement stipends for 6-12 months continuous months of supported research leave to pursue full-time collaborative research. Applications must be received by September 23.

Luce Foundation Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
Thefellowshipsprovide graduate students at any stage of Ph.D. dissertation research or writing with a stipend of $25,000, plus up to $2,000 as a travel allowance, for a non-renewable, one-year term beginning between June and September 2016 for the 2016-17 academic year. The fellowships may be carried out in residence at the fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for the research. Ten fellowships will be awarded through the program.

United Way Community Leaders Panel Survey Results: Volunteering
Greater impact could be achieved if volunteering were more strategic and if it could be more aligned with the prioritized goals of a community. But are communities volunteering opportunities currently guided more by personal preference or by community priorities? United Way CEOs were surveyed and 94% see volunteering occurring around individual preferences; only 58% view it as taking place around community priorities. According to the survey, the action that two-thirds of CEOs say could help those already volunteering have an even greater impact would be creating and promoting more volunteer opportunities aligned with community priorities.

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on August 3 and August 14.

Research & Resources

Arlington, Alexandria Residents to Consider Sharing a Pool, Fitness Center
Arlington County and the City of Alexandria are considering jointly building a long-delayed aquatics fitness center at Arlington’s Long Bridge Park. If Alexandria goes along with the idea, its $20 million plan to expand Chinquapin would be set aside. As part of a regularly scheduled survey about civic issues in Alexandria, a random sampling of residents will be asked whether they are interested in the idea. Arlington residents will be asked a similar question this fall as part of an update to the county’s public-spaces master plan.

ACPS Sees Significant Growth in SOL Test Scores
Alexandria City Public Schools (ACPS) realized significant growth in Standards of Learning (SOL) pass rates across the four core disciplines in all of its schools. ACPS SOL scores increased across English, math, history and science, with the largest increases in English and math, which were targeted focus areas during the past year. The pass rates for all schools in English and math increased or remained stable compared to last year’s results. Fourteen out of 16 schools saw increases in English and math, respectively. Nine schools saw increases in history.

He Mentored Youths and Won a College Scholarship. Then He Joined a Gang
The son of a drug-addicted mother and absent father graduated from T.C. Williams and won a college scholarship. But he dropped out, joined a gang and became part of a robbery crew. He has been sentenced to thirty years in prison.

Parent Connection Resource Guide
TheFall editionof the only region-wide listing of parenting programs and workshops throughout Northern Virginia, published by Stop Child Abuse Now (SCAN), is now available.

Parenting Classes by SCAN
In a series of classes offered by Stop Child Abuse Now (SCAN), participants learn about: child development, how to communicate physical and emotional needs, establishing routines for regular family activities, effective discipline methods, handling stress, and building family cohesion. Classes are offered free of cost in both English and Spanish and there are no eligibility or residency requirements. Classes meet from 6:00 – 8:30 PM one night a week for 8 weeks. SCAN staff and volunteers facilitate the class and provide a light dinner and childcare for all participating families. Interested parents must contact the Parent Education Coordinator (703.820.9001) to register and schedule an intake interview. Registration generally starts one month prior to class start date.

SCAN Fee-For-Service Workshops
SCAN has a long list of workshops that are available for presentation to community groups, schools, and churches.

Education
New Orleans Reforms Boost Student Performance
The education overhaul following Hurricane Katrina boostedstudent performance by eight to fifteen percentage points in the last decade. That range takes into account a variety of factors that could skew the number either way: the effects of trauma, population changes, test-based accountability, and students spending a spell in better-performing out-of-state schools after evacuating from New Orleans. “We are not aware of any other districts that have made such large improvements in such a short time,” writes economist and Education Research Alliance Director Douglas Harris in his article for Education Next.

Missouri Legislator Requests Justice Department Investigation of Administration of Education in St. Louis
In a letter to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal stated lower-income students disproportionately suffered from a lack of quality schools and education. In a letter to Republicans, she referred to a “well-organized effort to enslave children in substandard school buildings”.

Washington State Fined $100,000 Per Day for Education Funding Failure
Declaring that state lawmakers have failed to fix the state’s unconstitutional system for funding public schools, the Washington State Supreme Court imposed a daily $100,000 penalty on the legislature until it makes firmer commitments to increasing teacher salaries and reducing class sizes. The order stems from McCleary et al. v. State of Washington, filed by two families against the state in 2007.

International Baccalaureate Saw Rapid Growth in High-Poverty Schools
According to a new study, 60% of public schools in the United States offering International Baccalaureate diplomas in the 2012-13 school year received federal Title I money to support education for students in poverty. While 46% of IB-participating schools were considered “schoolwide” Title I programs serving 40% or more low-income students, study authors found only a third of students in Title I schools who actually took the exams to quality for the IB diploma were from low-income families.

The Next MacGyver
“The Next MacGyver” is a crowd-sourcing contestsponsored by the National Academy of Engineering to create a television pilot to popularize science among young people, particularly girls.

Gender Gaps at the Math Olympiad: Where Are the Girls?
The U.S. team won the International Math Olympiad for the first time in 21 years. But the six-person winning U.S. team had no girls.

‘Code: Debugging the Gender Gap’
Thedocumentary asks whether girls are as good as boys at computers and the 78-minute film proves they are. But women are underrepresented in the college study of computer science in the United States. They earn 57% of all college degrees, but only 18% of computer science degrees. The film devotes some time to Grace Hopper, a rear admiral in the Navy, who was a computer programming pioneer credited with the term “debugging” for fixing computer glitches, based on an actual moth that she found in an early machine.

These Girls are the Coders of the Future, and They’re Already Solving Problems
The seven-week Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program is a campthat aims to combat stereotypes about computer coders and encourage high school girls to pursue computer science education. During July and August, about 60 students attended the camp, sponsored by BSA (the Software Alliance), Lockheed Martin and the university. Girls Who Code, a nonprofit group, seeks to increase the number of women in technology.

Music Class May Help Students’ Language Skills
Newresearch by the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University concluded that instruction in music can improve performance in English/language arts.

Storytelling Skills in Black Children Tied to Early Literacy
According to new researchfrom the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute in North Carolina, the ability of African-American preschoolers to tell vivid, complex stories predicts their literacy skills when they are in kindergarten. It was surprising this link between “oral narrative” skills and early literacy was not seen in Latino, Asian, or white children. Oral narrative skills may be important for children of other races as well, but the importance may show up in areas other than kindergarten literacy. To measure the child’s storytelling skills, researchers told the children a story using pictures, then asked the children to retell the story, with the pictures serving as prompts. Children scored higher if they could retell the story coherently, using details and strong vocabulary. “Having a repertoire of different styles suggests that African-American children are flexible in their narratives, varying the narratives according to context. This flexibility may benefit African-American children as they transition from using oral language to the decoding and comprehension of written text.”

Hawaii to Expand Preschool Offerings Through Charters
Several charter schools in Hawaii are opening tuition-free preschool programs with the help of federal money. The U.S. Department of Education gave Hawaii a $14.8 million preschool development grant to pay for pre-K programs for low-income children. At the beginning of this school year, four charter preschools will open on the Big Island with enough money for another sixteen additional programs.

Save the Children Crusades to Make Preschool a Top-Tier Campaign Issue
Save the Children, the century-old child-welfare organization, has spun off a new political arm that is crusading to make early-childhood education a top-tier issue in the 2016 presidential campaign. Save the Children Action Network (SCAN) is running a multi-pronged strategy in the early-voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina designed to convince candidates from both parties that preschool is a winning issue among swing voters. Mark Shriver, SCAN’s president, formed the 501c(4) organization last year to “turn up the heat” on legislators and policymakers.

The Hidden Cost of Suspension – A Story Map
The National Center for Education Statistics has produced story maps that tell the story of out-of-school suspensions in school districts throughout the United States.

Kentucky Restraint Lawsuit 
The school-based sheriff’s deputy who cuffed the arms of a 3rd grader taught for four years in the 4,000 student Covington, Kentucky district before becoming a law enforcement officer. S.R v. Kenton County Sheriff’s Office was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, as well as the Children’s Law Center in Covington, and Dinsmore & Shohl, a Cincinnati law firm. The executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers said the officer involved in the incident did not go through his organization’s 40-hour, week-long training for school resource officers.

Rethinking Discipline Online Discussion
The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services hosted an online discussion between national experts about out-of-school suspensions, their impact on students, and effective alternatives.

Advancing School Discipline Reform
A guide released by the National Association of State Boards of Education provides suggestionsfor states to get involved in the growing discussion around reducing the use of suspensions and expulsions, and ensuring that children of all races, ethnicities, and sexual orientations are treated equitably under school policies.

National HIV Strategy Includes Call for Effective Sex Education in Schools
Because one in five new HIV diagnoses in 2013 were among 13- to 24-year-olds, and rates of infection continue to increase among young gay and bisexual men, the White House’s updated strategy to address HIV/AIDS includes a goal of reducing the number of new diagnoses by at least 25% by 2020, in part through effective education programs in schools and communities. It is “without question” the role of parents “to instill values and to provide the moral and ethical foundation for their children,” the report says, but officials must acknowledge a broad range of family structures, including single-parent and foster families, to ensure that all children have access to the information they need.

High School Graduation and Coursework: Class of 2013
Alongitudinal study of 20,000 9th graders is the latest in a series of cohort studies of the long-term educational and employment experiences of high school students. In its second follow-up of the 2009 class of ninth graders, the U.S. National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) found that 89% graduated on time in 2013, and another 3% acquired a high school equivalency certificate. Some 4% had dropped out, and an identical percentage remained in high school, presumably due to repeating a grade.

‘First and 17’
Thedocumentary produced by The Washington Post captures all the drama, joy, heartbreak, and tragedy that comes with a high school football season. The film is about Da’Shawn Hand, a star defensive lineman at Woodbridge High School who had received 94 college scholarship offers by the beginning of his senior year. He has narrowed his choices to three finalists: the universities of Alabama, Florida, and Michigan. The real gem of the film is first-year coach Karibi DeDe, who guides his team through a tragedy to success on the field.

Former TV Anchor Campbell Brown to Launch Education News Site
The new online news organization will cover efforts to improve the education system. The site is called The Seventy Four, referring to the 74 million U.S. school children.

School Librarians Want More Tech – And Bandwidth
According to School Library Journal’s 2015 Technology Survey, school librarians utilizing technology tools more heavily than in previous years, but they remain challenged by budget shortfalls and limited school web connectivity.

Youth Well-Being
State of the World’s Mothers 2015: The Urban Disadvantage
The 16th annual reportby Save the Children evaluates the devastating health disparities between the rich and poor living in some of the major cities around the world as well as assesses the well-being of mothers and children in 179 countries. The United States continues its descent in the global rankings of best and worst places for mothers, slipping two places to 33rd out of 179 surveyed countries. The 2015 report found that women in the United States face a shocking one in 1,800 lifetime risk of maternal death – the worst performance of any developed country in the world. This means that an American woman is, on average, more than 10 times as likely to die in pregnancy and childbirth as a Polish, Austrian, or Belarusian woman; and an American child under five is just as likely to die as a child in Serbia or Slovakia.

State of America’s Babies: 2015
According to data gathered by Zero to Three, 51% of American children age 3 and younger live in poverty. The percentage of children living in poverty has not changed drastically from 2012. Among the findingswere 62% of infants’ moms work and the average cost of center-based infant care exceeds 23% of the median income for single parents, most of whom are women. In the District of Columbia, the cost of infant care is 84% of the median income for single mothers. Fifty-one percent of children age 3 and younger are white and 34% of them are in low-income families. Thirteen percent of children age 3 and younger are black, 70% of them living in poverty. Virginia ranked ninethin state rankings of the well-being of children 0-18.

2015’s Best and Worst States for Underprivileged Children
WalletHub compared the welfare of young people within the 50 states and the District of Columbia to underscore the social issues plaguing one of the most vulnerable groups of Americans. The comparisonwas based on a set of 15 key metrics, ranging from infant death rates to child food-insecurity rates to the percentage of maltreated children.

The Surprising Number of Parents Scaling Back at Work to Care for Kids
According to a new Washington Post poll, more than three-quarters of mothers and half of fathers in the United States say they have passed up work opportunities, switched jobs or quit to tend to their kids. Over the past 30 years, average weekly child-care expenses for families with working mothers who paid for the service surged more than 70% — from $87 to $148. And some areas are significantly more expensive than others. The annual cost for infant care, for instance, is about $5,600 in Louisiana, compared with about $22,000 in the District, according to Child Care Aware of America, a national organization focused on the quality of child care.

When Can Parents Let Children Be Alone?
A new report by the Family Defense Center, a nonprofit legal advocacy organization in Chicago, comes amid a growing national conversation about parenting choices and how far the government should go in enforcing laws designed to protect children. The report asserts the child welfare system “too often oversteps its authority and intervenes inappropriately in families’ lives, with devastating consequences”.

New Child Welfare Bill Focuses on Keeping Families Together
According to the Children’s Bureau of Health and Human Services, more than 400,000 children were in foster care in the United States in 2013. Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, the top Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, has introduced legislationthat would give states more flexibility in how they use child welfare funding. The Family Stability and Kinship Care Act would change how states can use money provided under Title IV-E of the Social Security Act. States would be able to pay for services such as family skills training or counseling, or concrete good and services such as a washer or dryer that could help a child stay at home, return home, or live with relatives. The bill would also increase funding for community-based prevention and intervention services by $470 million per year through the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program. The bill would provide $1 billion in mandatory funding through the program.

Teens, Technology and Friendships
The goal of a new in-depth study from the Pew Research Center is to understand how online interactions are shaping the social lives and identities of American teens. The majority do not consider meeting strangers online a taboo, with six in ten saying they have met at least one new friend on the Web. Teens are also texting and communicating through online games and social networks more frequently than they are spending time together in person. Of those who meet people online, one-third also followed up with an in-person meeting. Broadly speaking, the research found that the line between virtual and real worlds has almost completely blurred – and that kids say they have deep and meaningful relationships with people online and in person.

Trends in Television Food Advertising to Young People: 2014 Update
Astudyby the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut found that in 2014, children viewed on average 12.8 ads per day for foods, beverages, and restaurants, and adolescents viewed 15.2 ads per day –declines of 2% and 7%, respectively, versus 2013. However, children viewed 5% more food-related ads in 2014 than they had in 2007, and adolescents viewed 16% more. Categories with more advertising to youth in 2014 versus 2007 included candy, carbonated beverages, fast-food and other restaurants, and crackers and savory snacks, as well as yogurt and other dairy. Advertisements for bottled water and fruits and vegetables also increased, but these categories each represented less than 2% of food advertisements seen by youth.

Since Michael Brown, Police Shot and Killed 53 Teenagers. Who Were They?
According to data analyzed from two crowdsourced police watchdog projects, Fatal Encounters and KilledBy Police.net, 53 other teens have also been shot dead by police in the time since Michael Brown was shot.

Game Changers Reaches Middle School Boys With Message About Violence Against Women
GameChangers, a new after-school program for boys ages 11 to 14 developed by YWCA Knoxville (Tenn.). that began this summer,, teaches boys how to recognize dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking — and it gives them the skills to speak out when they witness it.

Mindfulness Study to Track Effect of Meditation on 7,000 Teenagers
Psychologists and neuroscientists from Oxford University and University College London have announcedplans to recruit children aged 11 to 16 from 76 secondary schools as part of a seven-year study. It would be the largest trial of its kind ever conducted and it would test some of the increasingly ambitious claims about the power of mindfulness meditation to tackle illnesses such as depression and anxiety.

Cutting To Cope
Cutting, which generally affects teens and young adults 12 to 24 years old, entails making small cuts on body parts such as wrists, arms, legs, stomach, chest, and even genital areas. Kids Health states that cutting is not a suicide attempt. Many teens say they cut to feel more alive and that it is only a temporary escape, similar to how people use drugs or alcohol.

Say It Out Loud
One in five teens lives with a mental health condition, yet less than half of them get help. Say it Out Loud,a project of the National Alliance of Mental Illness, consists of a toolkit that provides everything needed to engage teens in a conversation about mental health. It includes a short film with ten common warning signs and three youth sharing their stories, a guide on how to conduct a successful discussion with teens, and fact sheets to share with participants.

Foundations of Behavioral Health: Partnering to Serve the Mental Health Needs of Children in Child Welfare
The new learning model by the California Institute of Behavioral Health Solutions provides an overview of California’s public children’s mental health system.

Using Brain Science to Boost Social and Emotional Skills
Thesecond issue brief in the series by the University of Minnesota Extension explores the relevance of brain science to social and emotional learning, with a particular emphasis on how youth workers can apply this learning to youth development programs.

The Relationship between Cross-Age Teaching and Social & Emotional Learning
This is the first in a series of youth development issue briefs by University of Minnesota Extension designed to help people understand, connect and champion social and emotional learning in a variety of settings and from a variety of perspectives.

Latino Children a Focus of USA Swimming Foundation’s 2015 Campaign
While the abnormally high drowning rate for African-American children has been documented and reported on, less attention has been directed at Hispanic youth. According to a 2010 studycommissioned by the USA Swimming Foundation, 60% of Hispanic youth cannot swim. Under its Make a Splash campaign (which uses partnerships with more than 725 swim-lesson providers and advocacy organizations to increase access to swim programs), the foundation has set a goal of teaching 800,000 children to swim. Specific measures have been taken to ensure access to the Latino community, including the addition of Spanish-speaking representatives on its Make a Splash tour, which recently hit its 40th city since the campaign’s debut in 2009. As of May, nearly 300,000 had received lessons.

Changes to Federal After-school, Summer Meals Programs Sought
Possible updates to federal child nutrition laws could make it easier for the organizers of summer and afterschool programs to serve nutritious snacks and meals. Advocates are pushing for changes that would expand the number of communities eligible for federal summer or after-school programs and streamline their administration.

Juvenile Justice
Illinois Reforming Juvenile Justice System
Governor Bruce Rauner signed legislationthat would end automatic transfers to adult court for 15 year-olds and limit the transfer of 16 and 17 year-olds charged with first-degree murder, aggravated criminal sexual assault or aggravated battery with a firearm. The Evanston-based nonprofit advocacy group Juvenile Justice Initiative found that 99% of the 257 juvenile offenders who were automatically placed in adult court between 2010 and 2012 were nonwhite.

Studying Deterrence Among High-Risk Adolescents
OJJDP has released “Studying Deterrence Among High-Risk Adolescents,” the latest bulletin in the Pathways to Desistance series. This bulletin examines the link between perceptions of the threat of sanctions and deterrence from crime among high-risk adolescents. The authors’ findings show that severe punishment—such as correctional placement or a longer stay in correctional placement—does not meaningfully reduce juvenile offending or arrests among these youth.

Model Programs Guide
OJJDP’sModel Programs Guide (MPG), an online resource of evidence-based juvenile justice and youth prevention, intervention, and reentry programs, has added three new literature reviews: Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Treatment/TherapyImplementation Science, and Status Offenders. In addition to literature reviews, MPG offers program profiles, information on program implementation, and resource links.

Workshops & Webinars

English Language Learning During the Out-of-School Time (August 19, 1 – 1:30 p.m.)
The focus of the webinar, the first in the new Youth Today Lunch-Time webinar series, is using research-based strategies to support English language learners in a low-stakes and low-stress learning environment. The cost is $35.

College Access Mentoring: Preparing Your Students for Graduation and Beyond (August 20, 1 – 2:15 p.m.)
Presenters will sharepractical tips and emerging tools for mentoring programs to help students achieve college and career outcomes. This webinar is part of the Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series, which is supported by the National Mentoring Resource Center, a new online resource developed by OJJDP and MENTOR.

Strategies for Building Meaningful Relationships with Youth (August 26, 2 – 3:30 p.m.)
Thewebinar will highlight how professionals working in juvenile corrections settings can build healthy, meaningful relationships with youth that will maintain the safety and security of youth and staff in facilities. Presenters will discuss how meaningful relationships can improve youth outcomes—both while they are in facilities and afterwards.

Police, Youth, and Community Relations: Improving Outcomes and Restoring Trust through Youth Voice (August 26, 3 – 415 p.m.)
Thewebinar will highlight the new report on police-youth relations by the Center for Court Innovation’s Youth Justice Board and its recommendations to improve public safety and restore trust in communities. Presenters will discuss how police and youth can work together to improve policing, police-youth contact, and diversion programming.

Integrating Employability Skills into Everyday Instruction (September 2)
The webinar will showcase a new, interactive learning module, Integrating Employability Skills: A Framework for All Educators. Building off of the Employability Skills Framework, the module prepares all educators to integrate employability skills into their everyday instruction. Presenters will discuss the value and uses of the employability skills framework and complimentary module including its development, pilot efforts, and potential uses.

Webinar Series on Human Trafficking (On Demand)
Two webinar seriesfrom the Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime’s training and technical assistance center are targeted to better serving victims of human trafficking – “Human Trafficking, Domestic Violence, and Sexual Assault: Strategies to Strengthen Community Collaboration to Respond to Survivors’ Needs”,and “Capacity Building Webinars for Human Trafficking Service Providers”.

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