News

Youth Topics in Alexandria October 26th Edition| Newsletter | City of Alexandria

Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families, Department of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria. It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services.

Subscribe here. Make inquiries here. Youth Topics is posted online here.

In the October 26 Edition:

Events
National Youth Justice Awareness Month (October)
Domestic Violence Awareness Month (October)
Bullying Prevention Awareness Month (October)
Mayor’s Campaign to End Bullying Stakeholders’ Meeting (October 27)
Youth Service Day at Alexandria Food Center (October 31)
ACAP Youth 360 Training (November 4)
Text, Talk, Act (November 10)
Health Fair (November 14)
How Research Evidence Informs Foster Youth Medication Policies (November 20)
National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health (November 20-22)
Family Volunteer Day (November 21)
Achieving Collective Impact: How Partnerships Change Community Outcomes (December 1-3)
National Reading Recovery& K-6 Literacy Conference (February 6-9)

Careers/Volunteerism
Holiday Sharing
Ribbon Week Poster Contest
IvenTeam Initiative to Cultivate High School Student Creativity
The Reach Initiative and U.S. Department of Education Launch Mobile App $225K Competition to Help Students Prepare for Their Future
Invest in Kids Campaign Toolkit
Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards
Arts Scholarship Program
Young Jazz Composer Awards
U.S.-Japan Foundation Pre-College Education Program
U.S.-Japan Foundation Leadership Program
Student Mental Health Award
Scholarships for LGBTQ Students
American Association on Health and Disability Scholarships
Sigma Xi Student Science and Engineering Research Grants
Lerner-Gray Fund for Marine Research Grants
Steven A. Stahl Research Grant
Mathematics Graduate Course Work Scholarships
Secondary Teacher Course Work Scholarships
Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching
Regie Routman Teacher Recognition Grant
UNESCO King Hamad Bin Isa Al-Khalifa Prize for the Use of ICTs in Education
Technology and Literacy Award
Congressional Fellowship Program
National Academy of Education Research Fellowships
Ransom Center Research Fellowships
Open Society Fellowships
AAUW American Fellowships
AAUW Career Development Grants
Physician-Scientist Training Award

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities

Research & Resources
Report Shows Decrease in High Risk Behaviors Amongst ACPS Students
Alexandria Library to Debut Book and App Recommendation Service for Children
New International Academy Opens at Francis C. Hammond Middle School
First Redistricting Community Meeting Sees Large Turnout

Education
Is Your State Making the Grade? 2015 National Report Card
How the States Got Their Rates
Gates Reaffirms K-12 Priorities Amid Shifting Political Landscape
Measuring Up: Educational Improvement and Opportunity in 50 Cities
Student Assessments in Public School Not Strategic, Often Redundant
Studies Probe How Schools Widen Achievement Gaps
Program for Parents Helps Sustain Learning Gains in Kids from Head Start to Kindergarten
College Readiness? What About High School Readiness?
Ensuring College Readiness and Academic System Alignment for All Students
Aligning K-12 and Postsecondary Career Pathways with Workforce Needs
Kids Experiment with STEM for National Youth Science Day
Teen Clockmaker’s White House Visit Shines Spotlight on School Discipline
STEM Education Act of 2015
MacArthur Foundation Launches Nonprofit to Scale Up Digital Learning
San Francisco School Delays Election Over Lack of Diversity
Seattle Parent Donates $70,000 to Save Teacher’s Job
Former Chicago Schools CEO Indicted in Alleged Bribery, Kickback Scheme
Microsoft’s Commitment to Data Privacy Questioned
Schools, Government Agencies Move to Share Student Data
A Framework for More and Better Learning through Community Schools Partnerships
White House, Ed Dept. Partner to Address Needs of Black English-Language Learners
Unaccompanied Child Migrants in U.S. Communities, Immigration Court, and Schools
Supporting Undocumented Youth

Youth Well-Being
Two Fields Come Together in New Center for Afterschool and Summer Enrichment
Are Parents Ruining Youth Sports? Fewer Kids Play Amid Pressure
After the School Day in Finland, Play and More Play
Sports, Out-of-School Volunteering May Ease Transition to Middle Grades
Child Poverty in the Aftermath of the Great Recession
Global Employment Trends for Youth 2015
Generation Study Abroad

National Center of Excellence for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
Teach Your Baby How To Use the Word “Help”
Beyond‘Turn it Off’: How To Advise Families on Media Use
Childhood is Not a Mental Disorder
Child Forensic Interviewing: Best Practices
Has Child Protective Services Gone Too Far?
How to Talk to a Child About a Suicide Attempt in Your Family
New Campaign Focuses on Bullying of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

NIH Launches Landmark Study on Substance Use and Adolescent Brain Development
Young People’s Voices Called Critical in Addiction Movement
Truant Youth Who Underreport Marijuana Use Tend to Underreport Their Use of Alcohol but Not Risky Sexual Behaviors
Teen Foster Care Program Reduces Drug Use in Early Adulthood
What Works/LINKS Database
Effective Program Practices for At-Risk Youth
Creating Sexual Health Classrooms Inclusive of Teen Parents
Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Youth
The Sexual-Abuse-to-Prison Pipeline
FBI: 150+ Arrests, 149 Children Saved in Sex Trafficking Sting

Place Matters!
Health Care Issues for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care and Kinship Care
Health and Social Service Needs of US-Citizen Children with Detained or Deported Immigrant Parents

Juvenile Justice
Juvenile Court Statistics 2013
Journal of Juvenile Justice
Gender Injustice: System-Level Juvenile Justice Reforms for Girls
Locked In: Interactions with the Criminal Justice and Child Welfare Systems for LGBTQ Youth, YMSM, and YWSW Who Engage in Survival Sex

Workshops & Webinars
Partnership Between WIOA and TANF to Serve Youth (October 28)
Beyond Revenge: Practical Strategies for Prosecuting Image Exploitation (October 30)
Deconstructing Social Emotional Learning Practice (November 3)
Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series (Third Thursday of the Month)
Embedding Youth Development in Schools: A Thought Leader Conversation (On Demand)

Events

National Youth Justice Awareness Month
President Obama issued a proclamation recognizing October as National Youth Justice Awareness Month. There are more than 1 million arrests of youth younger than 18 each year, and the vast majority are for nonviolent crimes. Nearly 55,000 individuals younger than 21 are being held in juvenile justice facilities nationwide, including a disproportionate number of whom are young people of color, including tribal youth. The proportion of detained and incarcerated girls and young women, who are often victims of abuse, has also increased. A month-long observance is dedicated to preventing youth from entering the juvenile and criminal justice systems, and encourages communities to participate in activities and programs that help youth fulfill their potential.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month
According to the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, one in four women will become a victim of domestic violence. Millions of children each year witness domestic violence, which can have long-lasting negative effects on children’s emotional well-being, and social and academic functioning. In recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is offering resources to help educate parents and families, educa­tors, professionals, and policymakers about domestic violence.

Bullying Prevention Awareness Month
Bullying (verbal, physical, or via the Internet) can severely affect the victim’s self-image, social interactions, and school performance – often leading to insecurity, poor self-esteem, and depression in adulthood. School dropout rates and absences among victims of bullying are much higher than among other students. In support of Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is providing resourcesfor families, teens, educators, clinicians, mental health professionals, and law enforcement personnel on how to recognize, deal with, and prevent bullying.

Mayor’s Campaign to End Bullying Stakeholders’ Meeting (October 27)
Thecampaignwill host a Stakeholder’s Meeting from 4-5:30 p.m. in the Rotunda Room at T.C. Williams. Contact Mike Mackey(703.746.4496) to RSVP or obtain additional information.

Youth Service Day at Alexandria Food Center (October 31, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m.)
Volunteer Alexandria is teaming up with ALIVE! to host a youth service day at Alexandria’s newly renovated food center. The opportunityis geared towards youth ages 13-18, and volunteers will decorate canvas bags that will be used to distribute holiday food to seniors living on their own in the community. Youth are asked to bring items to donate to the Alexandria food center; snacks will be provided.

ACAP Youth 360 Training (November 4, 5:30 – 8 p.m.)
How and where youth live, learn and play matters –social determinants of health influence health inequities and disparities. To impact health outcomes, the full range of factors (such as access to quality education and health services, socioeconomic status, or having life goals and aspirations that shape our long-term physical, mental, emotional, and social health and well-being) must be considered. The free training by the Alexandria Campaign on Adolescent Pregnancy (ACAP) will take place in the Rotunda at T. C. Williams (3330 King Street). Please register by November 1.

Text, Talk, Act (November 10)
Young people are having a nationwide conversation about mental health and how to help a friend in need. Through text messaging, small groups receive discussion questions to lead them through a conversation about mental health. The November 10 conversation is in collaboration with the National Association of School Psychologists’ School Psychology Awareness Week.

Health Fair (November 14)
The free health fair at Francis Hammond Middle School (4646 Seminary Road) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. will feature fitness and health workshops; information on the Affordable Care Act and free help with the application; information and help with other health coverage options like Medicaid and GAP; and help applying for SNAP food assistance benefits. Any uninsured person living in the City of Alexandria is welcome to attend, especially residents who are 18-64 years old, have no access to a doctor, and are in poor health or have not been feeling well. For information, call 703.746.4357 or email. Flyers are available in EnglishSpanish, and Amharic.

How Research Evidence Informs Foster Youth Medication Policies (November 20)
The focus of the forum will be how mid-level policymakers in state child welfare agencies acquire, interpret, and use research evidence to develop policies regarding the use of medications for youth in foster care with the goal of improving their life and health outcomes. Responding to the dramatic increase in the use of these medications in recent years, the federal government mandated that all child welfare agencies develop plans to review and manage behavioral health services for youth. The event will take place from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. on Capitol Hill.

National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health (November 20-22)
The National Federation’s Annual Conference is the premier event for children and youth with mental health challenges and their families. Bringing together family members, young adults, and professionals in a safe setting, free from stigma and one that celebrates skills and successes, it generates a large amount of discussion on the current issues and trends pertaining to children’s mental health from the perspective of a family-driven and youth-guided approach. The conference will take place at the Omni Shoreham in Washington, D.C.

Family Volunteer Day (November 21, 9:30– 11:30 a.m.)
Families with children ages 6-12 are invited to join Volunteer Alexandria in a day of service. There will be six different stations to create items that will then be donated to nonprofits serving in Alexandria. The first twenty youth volunteers to sign up with their families will receive a free Family Volunteer Day t-shirt!

Achieving Collective Impact: How Partnerships Change Community Outcomes (December 1-3)
The Forum for Youth Investment is partnering with FSG to help communities effectively carry out collective impact strategies. A three-day institute in downtown Washington, D.C. teaches how to create the five conditions for successful collective impact approaches through clear, sequenced steps.

National Reading Recovery & K-6 Literacy Conference (February 6-9)
The conference sponsored by the Reading Recovery Council of North America will be held in Columbus, Ohio.

Careers/Volunteerism

Holiday Sharing
Now is the time to sign up to sponsor families, foster children, and senior/disabled citizens, to volunteer, or to support the Coat Drive.

Ribbon Week Poster Contest
Thecompetition asks elementary, middle and high school students to express their feelings about drug prevention through art. Entries must include a message promoting a drug-free environment, and can be freehand (using crayons and markers) or computer generated/assisted. All posters must be turned in or postmarked by November 13 to: The Family and Community Engagement (FACE) Center, 1340 Braddock Place, 7th Floor, Alexandria, VA 22314.

IvenTeam Initiative to Cultivate High School Student Creativity
Created by the Lemelson-MIT Program, the InvenTeam initiative provides opportunities for high school students to cultivate their creativity, curiosity, and problem-solving abilities and apply lessons from science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) subjects to invent technological solutions to real-world problems. InvenTeams of high school students, teachers, and mentors will receive grants of up to $10,000 to invent a technological solution to a problem of their choice. Projects can range from an assistive device to an environmental technology and to a consumer good. Applicants are encouraged to consider the needs of the world’s poorest people — those earning $2 or less a day — when brainstorming ideas, as well as the potential for community partnerships and other types of collaboration. Initial applications are due March 7, 2016. Upon review, selected applications will be invited to submit full proposals by September 6, 2016.

The Reach Initiative and U.S. Department of Education Launch Mobile App $225K Competition to Help Students Prepare for Their Future
In effort to inspire students to pursue an education beyond high school, First Lady Michelle Obama’s Reach Higher Initiative and the U.S. Department of Education (ED) formally launched amobile app competition to promote the development of mobile app solutions that will help students navigate education and career pathways, including career and technical education (CTE). Apps should include integrated tools to assess student skills and interests, and offer information on occupations, education options, credentials, and career-seeking skills. Mobile app developers, educators, and data mavens are encouraged to participate in the Challenge. Five finalists will receive $25,000 each. Submissions are due December 6.

Invest in Kids Campaign Toolkit
The Children’s Leadership Council has created a toolkit of resources to inspire action to make Congress aware of the importance of investing in the children.

Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards
Theawardsrecognize teens who have demonstrated remarkable leadership and are actively engaged in projects that embody the values of tikkun olam, or “repair of the world”. Teen projects may benefit the Jewish community or the general community. Up to fifteen teens (five from California and ten from other communities across the country) between the ages of 13 and 19 will be acknowledged for their efforts with an award of $36,000 that is to be used to further their philanthropic work or education. Nominations must be submitted by December 13.

Arts Scholarship Program
Through its scholarship program, the Anthony Quinn Foundation supports high school students in the extracurricular study of the visual arts and design, performing arts, media arts, and the literary arts. Scholarships may be used for a recognized pre-college, summer, or afterschool arts education program, but may not be used for either secondary school or college tuition. Full applications must be returned no later than January 3, 2016.

Young Jazz Composer Awards
The ASCAP Foundation in partnership with the Herb Alpert Foundation awards monetary prizes to encourage talented young jazz composers. Applicants must be under 30 and submit an original score of a composition accompanied by a CD. Submissionsare due December 1.

U.S.-Japan Foundation Pre-College Education Program
Thefoundationsupports programs that take advantage of new technology to bring Japanese and American teachers and students together; build human networks among teachers on both sides of the Pacific with a mutual interest in teaching and learning about Japan, the U.S., and U.S.-Japan relations, particularly in the fields of social studies and Japanese language instruction; and increase exposure to and resources for learning about the other country. Letters of Inquiry must be received no later than December 15; selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals by January 31, 2016.

U.S.-Japan Foundation Leadership Program
The program is devoted to developing a network of next-generation leaders in the two countries. Over the course of two summers, forty young leaders are brought together to explore and discuss important topics of mutual interest. Candidates must hold U.S. or Japan citizenship, be between the ages of 28 and 42 as of July 16, 2016, and have demonstrated leadership, achievement, or the potential for leadership in their respective fields. The deadline to apply is January 7, 2016.

Student Mental Health Award
A single grant of up to $2,500 will be awarded to support a student’s efforts to promote and improve the quality of mental health care available to college students. The award will support programs that can demonstrate measurable success in retaining as students those whose mental health problems. Applicants must be a full-time undergraduate or graduate student enrolled at an ACHA member institution. Preference will be given to graduate students engaged in mental health professional training programs.

Scholarships for LGBTQ Students
The Point Foundation will provide financial assistance and programmatic support to undergraduate and graduate LGBTQ students. Scholarship support can be used to address any number of challenges students face, including college tuition and fees. The online application portal will open November 1. Applicants must submit Part 1 of the application no later than January 19, 2016.

American Association on Health and Disability Scholarships
Thescholarshipsupports students with disabilities who are pursuing higher education. Preference is given to students who plan to pursue undergraduate/graduate studies in the fields of public health, health promotion, and disability studies. The maximum award is $1,000. The deadline to apply is November 15.

Sigma Xi Student Science and Engineering Research Grants
The society awards grants of up to $1,000 to students from all areas of the sciences and engineering. Designated funds from the National Academy of Sciences allow for grants of up to $5,000 for astronomy research and $2,500 for vision-related research. Applications are due March 15, 2016.

Lerner-Gray Fund for Marine Research Grants
The program of the Richard Gilder Graduate School of the American History Museum provides seed grants of up to $2,500 for research projects related to systematics, evolution, ecology, and field-oriented behavioral studies of marine animals. The deadline to apply is March 15, 2016.

Steven A. Stahl Research Grant
Thegrant by the International Literacy Association (ILA) is awarded annually to a recipient with at least three years teaching experience who is conducting classroom research (including action research) focused on improving reading instruction and children’s reading achievement. Applicants must be ILA members; applications are due January 15, 2016.

Mathematics Graduate Course Work Scholarships
The grants by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) provide financial support for improving teachers’ understanding of mathematics by completing graduate course work in mathematics. A maximum of $2,000 each will be awarded to teachers of grades PreK-56-8, and 9-12. The deadline to apply is November 6.

Secondary Teacher Course Work Scholarships
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) will award one scholarshipof up to $10,000 to a person currently completing their sophomore year of college, scheduling for full-time study at a four or five-year college or university in the next academic year, and pursuing a career goal of becoming a certified teacher of secondary mathematics. The deadline to apply is May 6, 2016.

Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching
The Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching recognizes five K-12 educators from across the United States who employ research-based practices to reduce prejudice, improve intergroup relations, and create an equitable school environment.

Regie Routman Teacher Recognition Grant
The $2,500 annual grant by the International Literacy Association (ILA) honors an outstanding mainstream, elementary classroom teacher dedicated to improving the teaching and learning of reading and writing across the curriculum in real world context in grades K-6. Applicationsmust be received by January 15, 2016.

UNESCO King Hamad Bin Isa Al-Khalifa Prize for the Use of ICTs in Education
The UNESCO King Hamad Bin Isa Al-Khalifa Prize for the Use of ICTs in Education, funded by the Kingdom of Bahrain, recognizesorganizations and individuals that are embracing information and communications technology (ICT) as a pedagogical ally and, in turn, make learning more effective. Nominations are due November 10.

Technology and Literacy Award
The International Literacy Association (ILA) award honors educators in grades K-12 who are making an outstanding and innovative contribution to the use of technology in reading education. One overall winner and up to seven regional winners will be honored. The deadline is January 15.

Congressional Fellowship Program
Through the annual program of the American Psychological Association, fellowsspend a year working for a member of Congress or a congressional committee. Activities may involve drafting legislation, conducting oversight work, assisting with congressional hearings and events, and/or preparing briefs and speeches. Fellowship stipends will range from $75,000 to $90,000, depending on years of postdoctoral experience. Applications are due January 8, 2016.

National Academy of Education Research Fellowships
The National Academy of Education/Spenser Postdoctoral Fellowship Program supports early career scholars working in critical areas of education research. Fellows receive $70,000 for one academic year of research, or $35,000 for each of two contiguous years, working half-time, and will be included in professional development retreats with other fellows. Applications are due November 5.

Ransom Center Research Fellowships
The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin will be awarding approximately seventy fellowshipsfor projects that require substantial on-site use of its collections. The 1-3 month fellowships support research in all areas of the humanities, including literature, photography, film, art, the performing arts, music, and cultural history. The deadline to apply is January 15, 2016.

Open Society Fellowships
Theprogram of the Open Society Foundations supports individuals pursuing innovative and unconventional approaches to fundamental open society challenges. A fellowship project might identify a problem that has not previously been recognized, develop a new policy idea to address a familiar problem, or offer a new advocacy strategy. The program accepts proposals from anywhere in the world. Full-time fellows based in the United States will receive a stipend of $80,000 – $100,000. Letters of Inquiry must be submitted by January 4, 2016.

AAUW American Fellowships
The annual program of the American Association of University Women supports women scholars who are completing a dissertation, planning a research leave from an accredited institution, or preparing research for publication. Applications are due November 15.

AAUW Career Development Grants
The program of the American Association of University Women assists women who, through additional education, technical training, or participation in a professional development institute, are making career changes, seeking to advance in their current careers, or re-entering the workforce. Grants of up to $12,000 will be awarded in support of coursework toward a degree program other than a doctorate or for specialized training in a technical or professional field. Primary consideration will be given to women of color, women pursuing credentials in a non-traditional field, and women who do not currently hold an advanced degree. Applications are due December 15.

Physician-Scientist Training Award
The annual program provides physicians who wish to pursue a career in cancer research with the opportunity for a protected research training experience under the mentorship of a highly qualified and gifted mentor after they have completed their clinical training. The award will provide up to $460,000 in financial support over four years. In addition, the foundation will retire up to $100,000 of any outstanding medical school debt owed by a grant recipient. The deadline is December 1.

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on October 5October 9, and October 16.

Research & Resources

Report Shows Decrease in High Risk Behaviors Amongst ACPS Students
Results of the newly released Youth Risk Behavior Survey show that risk behaviors of Alexandria City Public Schools students, including substance use, sexual behavior and aggressive and violent behaviors, have decreased in the past three years. Data collected through surveying eighth-, tenth-, and twelfth-grade students show that these risk behaviors have decreased amongst ACPS students when compared to 2011 results. In addition, ACPS students reported lower levels of risk behaviors when compared to national averages in these critical areas. Mental health and recreational screen time were areas of concern that showed increases over the last three years. More students reported internalizing mental health concerns, including sad or hopeless feelings and the consideration of suicide as a possible solution.

Alexandria Library to Debut Book and App Recommendation Service for Children
Alexandria Library is launching Beanstack, an innovative new way to connect children and their families with books, educational programs and apps that match each child’s specific age, interests, reading level and background. The online portal offers free personalized recommendations for books, apps, events and more. Residents of Alexandria can sign up and use Beanstack from their home computer, mobile device, or at their local Alexandria Library branch. Every week a book in the library’s collection, along with a relevant program or event at their preferred branch, will be suggested specifically for their child. Recommendations are sent with a learning tip by email and are also available via an online profile that families can access anytime. In addition to helping families discover great books, the web application includes a reading log and fun badges. Residents do not need a library card to get started.

New International Academy Opens at Francis C. Hammond Middle School
Alexandria City Public Schools and Francis C. Hammond Middle School opened an International Academy: a school-within-a-school model of services designed to make it easier for students coming from other countries to settle in and be successful in their schoolwork. The International Academy at Hammond is the first middle school of its kind in the D.C. metro area and the first middle school to be set up by the Internationals Network for Public Schools (INPS).

First Redistricting Community Meeting Sees Large Turnout
The Alexandria City School Board approved the selection of 35 people for the Redistricting Review Committee who will be the voices of their communities in the process of creating better school attendance boundaries for Alexandria City Public Schools. There were 120 in attendance at the first Community Meeting for the redistricting process. Community meetings, in addition to Redistricting Review Committee and Steering Group Meetings, will be held at regular intervals.

Education
Is Your State Making the Grade? 2015 National Report Card
In its second study of financial literacy education requirements across the states, Champlain College’s Center for Financial Literacy gave five states an A grade. Utah topped the list with an A+, followed by Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, and Missouri. The study looked at states’ graduation requirements, academic standards, and regulations regarding how personal-finance courses are delivered in public high schools. For a state to get an A, high school students must be required to take the equivalent of a half-year personal finance course in order to graduate.

How the States Got Their Rates
While graduation rates in the United States have hit historic highs, a new analysis found that the level of coursework needed to earn a high school diploma differs from state to state. According to a report by the nonprofit Achieve, just four states (Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee) and the District of Columbia require students to complete college and career-ready level courses in math and English/language arts to graduate. Achieve, which play a key role in launching the Common Core State Standards initiative, looked at 93 diploma options from across the states and D.C. for the Class of 2014. Of the 26 states with multiple diplomas, just nine publicly report the percentage of students who graduated with the college-and-career-ready coursework.

Gates Reaffirms K-12 Priorities Amid Shifting Political Landscape
In his first major speech on education in seven years, philanthropist Bill Gates made it clear his foundation is not backing away from the twin priorities that have defined its K-12 work since 2008—teacher effectiveness and common academic standards—even as both initiatives have sparked a turbulent transformation in the nation’s schools and become deeply politicized.

Measuring Up: Educational Improvement and Opportunity in 50 Cities
Thereport by the University of Washington’s Center for Reinventing Public Education provides a new resource for understanding the state of urban public schools in the U.S. Geared specifically toward city leaders who want to evaluate how well traditional district and charter schools are serving all their city’s children and how their schools compare to those in other cities, the report measures outcomes for all public schools, based on test scores and non-test indicators, in 50 mid- and large-sized cities – selected based on their size and because they reflect the complexity of urban public education today, where a single school district is often no longer the only education game in town. The analysis revealed some bright spots, but performance in most cities is flat. Poor and minority students face staggering inequities, and the picture is especially bleak for black students. Quoting the authors, “these problems call for big changes, not incremental tweaks, and highlight the need to identify and learn from cities that are showing that things can get better”.

Student Assessments in Public Schools Not Strategic, Often Redundant
studyby the Council of the Great City Schools (which represents the nation’s largest urban school districts) found that students in 66 of its 68 member school districts, spend a lot of time taking tests. Some of those tests are redundant, and others are used for purposes for which they were not designed. Eighth graders spent an average of 25.3 hours—or more than four school days—taking mandatory tests in the 2014-15 school year, the highest number of hours in any of the tested grades, according to the study. The results of mandated tests were often returned to districts months after they had been taken, reducing their usefulness for classroom instruction. Among the findings of the study were students in the 66 districts took 401 unique tests last year and sat for tests more than 6,570 last year. There was, however, no correlation between time spent testing and improved math and reading scores.

Studies Probe How Schools Widen Achievement Gaps
Two separate new studies—one on the National Assessment of Educational Progress in 8th grade math, the other on 15-year-olds’ math performance on the Program for International Student Assessment—both find that achievement gaps within schools account for more of the overall achievement disparities among students of different races or economic backgrounds than do gaps between schools. On NAEP, within-school differences in achievement accounted for 16 score points of the 31-point gap in math scores between nearly 100,000 white and black 8th graders in 2011. By contrast, the study attributed only 5 points of the gap to disparities from school to school, and 10 points to other factors. In the 33-country PISA study, disparities within schools also accounted for a larger portion of the math performance gap between wealthy and impoverished students in English-speaking countries, and in the United States the within-school disparities were worse than the OECD average.

Program for Parents Helps Sustain Learning Gains in Kids from Head Start to Kindergarten
According to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health, an instructional program for parents helps young children retain the literacy skills and positive learning behaviors acquired in Head Start and retain them through to the end of the kindergarten year.

College Readiness? What About High School Readiness?
Educators at the middle school level are working in a variety of waysto make sure that young adolescents are ready to do well in high school.

Ensuring College Readiness and Academic System Alignment for All Students
Aninteractive guidebook includes interviews with community leaders about their partnership engagement practices and results, as well as templates, tools and additional resources to implement the strategies along The Pathway to College.

Aligning K-12 and Postsecondary Career Pathways with Workforce Needs
Thereport examines the policy efforts in 13 states to improve alignment between high school and postsecondary career/technical education (CTE) programs and workforce needs. A chart allows for an easy way to compare and contrast approaches to policymaking activity from the 13 highlighted states.

Kids Experiment with STEM for National Youth Science Day
Students from Patrick Henry Elementary School were among 400 students from Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Washington who filled a ballroom at the Ronald Reagan Building to participate in what organizers called the nation’s largest youth-led science experiment.

Teen Clockmaker’s White House Visit Shines Spotlight on School Discipline
Supporters of the Texas teen clockmaker Ahmed Mohamed say his case demonstratedhow school discipline is often administered unfairly, especially for students of color. Others, including conservative politicians, said the public was too quick to judge those responding to what they saw as a potential safety threat. According to the Advancement Project, a Washington-based racial justice organization, Ahmed is not the first student to be disciplined for a science project. The group organized a media appearance for Kiera Wilmot, a black Florida student who was arrested on two felony charges after her science experiment, a volcano model, malfunctioned. She was later expelled and then allowed to return to school and graduate following a public outcry, the organization said.

STEM Education Act of 2015
Thelegislation, which has reached the desk of President Obama, calls on the National Science Foundation to continue to award competitive merit-reviewed grants that support research into what works best in out-of-school time and informal STEM education.

MacArthur Foundation Launches Nonprofit to Scale Up Digital Learning
The Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation, which over the past decade has poured more than $200 million into digital media and learning, will give $25 million to help a new entity dubbed Collective Shift get off the ground. Collective Shift will initially focus on expanding the work done in recent years in five MacArthur-supported “connected cities”: Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and Washington.

San Francisco School Delays Election Over Lack of Diversity
A student government election at a mostly Hispanic San Francisco middle school turned into a debate about the democratic process when the principal delayed the results because the winners did not reflect the school’s diverse student body. The school of about 500 6th, 7thand 8th graders is 56% Hispanic or Latino, and 9% African-American. The school is in the city’s Mission District, where rents have soared as technology workers move in and gentrify the neighborhood.

Seattle Parent Donates $70,000 to Save Teacher’s Job
A Seattle parent has donated $70,000 to save a teaching job at an elementary school that his own kids do not attend. He says he did it to some degree out of spite: “My broader goal was to shame the [district] administration and the legislature and the mayor, for the fact that a private citizen and parents are putting up money to support children, because they’re doing nothing,” Brian Jones told local news station KIRO7. Jones, who runs a documentary film production company, made his generous donation to Alki Elementary in west Seattle after reading that a parent group there had started a campaign to raise the $90,000 they were told they had to have to keep a jeopardized teaching slot.

Former Chicago Schools CEO Indicted in Alleged Bribery, Kickback Scheme
Former Chicago schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett has been indicted in connection with allegedly using her power to steer more than $23 million in no-bid contracts to her former employers. The 23-count indictment from the U.S. Department of Justice alleges that Byrd-Bennett steered the contracts to The Supes Academy, and Synesi Associates in exchange for an expectation of hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes, kickbacks, and other compensation. Gary Solomon and Tom Vranas, co-owners of the SUPES Academy, were also criminally charged.

Microsoft’s Commitment to Data Privacy Questioned
Privacy experts and media outlets are concerned by what they see as overly aggressive data collectionby Microsoft’s newly unveiled operating system, Windows 10. For example, Windows 10 appears to collect extensive data about the Web addresses that users visit, then sends that information back to the company’s servers for storage. In one test conducted by a computer engineer at the request of Education Week, an individual student’s login and password for a popular online educational service were among the data sent back to Microsoft.

Schools, Government Agencies Move to Share Student Data
K-12 school systems in more than a dozen cities and counties have begun linking children’s educational records with data from other government agencies, covering everything from children’s mental-health status to their history of child-welfare placements and their involvement in the juvenile-justice system. Proponents say that such intergovernmental “integrated data systems” can yield powerful insights that promote a more holistic understanding of children’s experiences. They point to an emerging track record of the information being used to improve policy, service delivery, and program evaluation.

A Framework for More and Better Learning through Community Schools Partnerships
A new report from the Coalition for Community Schools demonstrates how community schools promote better learning by working with community partners that are results-oriented. The report also spotlights four community schools that are setting the success bar high.

White House, Ed Dept. Partner to Address Needs of Black English-Language Learners
The White House and U.S. Department of Education are teaming up to find ways to better serve the nation’s black English-language learners in K-12 schools. A Pew Research Center report released in April indicates that the United States is now home to the largest number of foreign-born black people in its history, and many of the students are now enrolled in the nation’s public schools. A fact sheetfrom the Education Department’s office of English-language acquisition and the White House Initiative on Education Excellence for African Americans shows that Spanish, French Creole, and French are the most common languages spoken at home by the 130,000-plus English-learners. Roughly 40% of black English-learners speak Spanish at home. While the most commonly spoken languages are usually identified with Central American and African countries, Arabic, Vietnamese, Japanese, and German are among the 15 most-common spoken by black ELLs. This fall, the office of English-language acquisition released an ELL toolkitdesigned to help public schools ensure that English-language learners have access to a high-quality education.

Unaccompanied Child Migrants in U.S. Communities, Immigration Court, and Schools
Tens of thousands of unaccompanied school-aged children and youths crossed the U.S.-Mexico border in the spring and summer of 2014. A report by the Migration Policy Institute found the needs of the students are met in some places and rebuffed in others. “Anecdotal reports suggest school districts are reacting in significantly different ways, some creating service programs that address the children’s particular needs, while others have exercised policies that make school enrollment more difficult,” wrote the author of the report. It cites the work of three school districts, including the Montgomery County, Md., Sussex County, Del., and Dalton, Ga., schools for their efforts to address the needs of the unaccompanied minors, including trauma, interrupted formal education, family reunification, and legal issues. While it cites the accommodations provided by Montgomery County, it points to New York’s Nassau County schools and several districts in North Carolina that have pushed back against the arrival of unaccompanied minors.  
Supporting Undocumented Youth
The U.S. Department of Education has released the first in a set of resource guides designed to help school officials support undocumented immigrant students. The 63-page guide aims to clarify the legal rights of undocumented high school and college students, share resources about federal and private financial aid available to them, and discuss how to support youth applying for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) consideration or renewal. The DACA program allows students who came to the United States as children to apply for relief from deportation. An Education Department release indicates that “nearly 1.5 million undocumented youth in the United States are eligible for DACA, and another 400,000 will become eligible in coming years.” The Department plans to release a resource guide for preschool and elementary school settings in the coming month.

Youth Well-Being
Two Fields Come Together in New Center for Afterschool and Summer Enrichment
The federal Office of Child Care has created the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment and funded it with a $10 million, five year grant.

Are Parents Ruining Youth Sports? Fewer Kids Play Amid Pressure
The number of children playing team sports is falling, with experts blaming a parent-driven focus on elite travel clubs, specialization in one sport, and pursuit of scholarships for hurting the country’s youth sports leagues.

After the School Day in Finland, Play and More Play
Students in Finland have consistently posted top scores on international tests. It began retooling its schools in the 1970s, focusing on equality in education. Finland took a direction opposite that of the United States in restructuring education. It has found great success with shorter school days, less homework, much higher teacher autonomy, greater teacher training and almost no standardized tests. In addition, they do not use afterschool hours to enhance student academics. Finland simply lets children play.

Sports, Out-of-School Volunteering May Ease Transition to Middle Grades
Of the 1,400 low-income urban adolescents who were followed in the ongoing Adolescent Pathways Project, more than a third of 5th graders and 40% of middle school students said they participated in no activities in or out of school, or that they participated once a month or less. Students who participated in one or two sports or community activities outside of school a few times a month had higher grade point averages, particularly if they became more involved in those activities during their 6th grade year. Interestingly, Schwartz found no academic benefit for students participating in school-based activities, such as pep squad, drama or student government. Researchers found religious activities, such as participating in church youth groups or retreats, were actually associated with lower GPAs, particularly if a student increased his participation from 5th to 6th grade.

Child Poverty in the Aftermath of the Great Recession
Data recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau demonstratethat poverty rates among families with children not only increased during the Great Recession but have declined only slightly five years after it ended.

Global Employment Trends for Youth 2015
The Global Employment Trends for Youth 2015 provides an update on key youth labor market indicators and trends, focusing both on the continuing labor market instability and on structural issues in youth labor markets. The report offers valuable lessons learned on “what works” for youth employment and on emerging practices in policy responses. Ideally, these will shape future investments in youth employment, as countries continue to prioritize youth in their national policy agendas.

Generation Study Abroad
campaign begun last year by the Institute for International Education seeks to dramatically increase the number of American college students who study abroad. The short-term goal is to double the number of students who study abroad by the year 2020 from 300,000 undergraduates per year (or less than 1 in 10 of all undergraduates) to 600,000. There will be more focus on connecting with students in high school because those are the students who will be in college soon enough to help reach the end-of-the-decade goal. But the longer-term strategy will involve virtual hookups with elementary and middle schools.

National Center of Excellence for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and Administration for Children and Families (ACF) announced that they have joined together to establish a new National Center of Excellence for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (Center of Excellence). The Education Development Center, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts will receive $6 million over the course of the next four years to manage the Center of Excellence, which advances infant and early childhood mental health intervention that promotes the social, emotional, and behavioral health and development of young children. It has been shown to improve young children’s social skills, reduce challenging behaviors, enrich adult-child relationships, improve classroom quality, and reduce teacher stress and turnover.

Teach Your Baby How To Use the Word“Help”
Thevideo is one of a series on the GoToMom website.

Beyond ‘Turn it Off’: How To Advise Families on Media Use
In 2011 the American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirmed a recommendation that parents discourage television viewing in children under 2. In 2013, it followed that guideline with a further recommendation that children over 2 should have only one to two hours of “entertainment screen time” per day. On October. 1, the group released a paper called “Beyond ‘Turn it Off’: How to Advise Families on Media Use.” The AAP guidelines noted above remain in place, but the paper said that the physicians’ group is preparing new recommendations that will take into account the technological shifts that have occurred over just the past few years. In May, the AAP convened a symposium, “Growing Up Digital,” which focused on the wide variety of digital media currently in use, and how it fits in with youth development.. Experts who attended the event said that parents need to be aware of what activities may be displaced by media use, model appropriate “digital etiquette,” and create tech-free zones. Symposium speakers also said that gaming can be a powerful learning tool, families should engage in using digital media together, and online interactions help teens build community and creativity.

Childhood is Not a Mental Disorder
Avideoprovides an important reminder that at the end of the day, kids are just kids.

Child Forensic Interviewing: Best Practices
OJJDP has released “Child Forensic Interviewing: Best Practices.” The bulletin highlights best practices for interviewing children in cases of alleged abuse. The authors discuss the purpose of the child forensic interview, provide historical context, review overall considerations, and outline each stage of the interview.

Has Child Protective Services Gone Too Far?
A debate sparked by the free-range parenting movement has drawn attentionto the threats and intrusions poor, minority families have long endured.

How to Talk to a Child About a Suicide Attempt in Your Family
Anonline resourcefrom the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs provides age-specific information for talking with children and adolescents about a family member’s suicide attempt. Learn why talking about a suicide attempt is important, when to talk about an attempt, how much information to share, ways to support children and adolescents, and examples on what to say and how to say it.

New Campaign Focuses on Bullying of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders
The White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders has announced a cooperative campaign aimed at preventing and addressing bullying among Asian-American and Pacific-Islander youths. The “Act to Change” initiative, created in partnership with the Sikh Coalition and the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment and announced on Thursday, will include a public awareness campaign and a challenge to young people to share their stories with their peers.

NIH Launches Landmark Study on Substance Use and Adolescent Brain Development
NIH awarded thirteen grants to research institutions around the country as part of a landmark studyof the effects of adolescent substance use on the developing brain. The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study will follow approximately 10,000 children beginning at age nine to ten (before they initiate drug use) through the period of highest risk for substance use and other mental health disorders. Scientists will track exposure to substances (including nicotine, alcohol, and marijuana), academic achievement, cognitive skills, mental health, and brain structure and function using advanced research methods.

Young People’s Voices Called Critical in Addiction Movement
Leaders of addiction and recovery organization say the voices of young people are essential in an emerging effort to change how the country views drug and alcohol addiction, and long-term recovery.

Truant Youth Who Underreport Marijuana Use Tend to Underreport Their Use of Alcohol but Not Risky Sexual Behaviors
A follow-up study of youths participating in a brief intervention for drug involved truants examined whether persons who tested positive for marijuana but did not report marijuana use were also less likely to report alcohol use or risky sexual activities. The study found that underreporting of marijuana use was associated with self-denial of alcohol use, but was not associated with self-reported engagement in risky sexual behaviors.

Teen Foster Care Program Reduces Drug Use in Early Adulthood
Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care has demonstrated advantages over group residential placement for teen girls who are mandated to out-of-home care by the juvenile justice system. New findings from a follow-up to a trial supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse indicate that those benefits extend to a reduction in illegal drug use in young adulthood.

What Works/LINKS Database
Child Trends’ What Works/LINKS database (LINKS stands for Lifecourse Interventions to Nurture Kids Successfully) is a searchable register of over 700 programs that have had at least one randomized, intent-to-treat evaluation to assess child or youth outcomes related to education, life skills, and social/emotional, mental, physical, behavioral, or reproductive health. Program eligibility was not dependent on whether significant program impacts were found.

Effective Program Practices for At-Risk Youth
Why do some youth programs succeed in generating funding and followers while others fizzle out for lack of support? This question is addressed in a book that presents effective keys to designing and running successful youth programs.

Creating Sexual Health Classrooms Inclusive of Teen Parents
Negative statements about teen parenthood can isolate young people with personal connections to young moms and dads. Three tips are provided for creating a sexual health program that fosters an inclusive environment for teen parents and those who care about them.

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Youth
A five-page policy briefdiscusses a study comparing the types of trauma exposure, trauma-related symptomatology, functional impairments, and problem behaviors of a clinical CSEC cohort (defined as youth in the CDC who reported involvement in prostitution) with a clinical group of youth who had no reported involvement in prostitution, but had a history of sexual abuse/assault.

The Sexual-Abuse-to-Prison Pipeline
The Ms. Foundation for Women, the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, and the Human Rights Project for Girls released a report, “The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story,” with groundbreaking new data on the funneling of victims of abuse into incarceration. Among the study’s many findings are data confirming that sexual abuse is a “primary predictor” for involvement with the juvenile-justice system, and that girls of color—particularly African-Americans, Native Americans, and Latinas—are disproportionately affected.

FBI: 150+ Arrests, 149 Children Saved in Sex Trafficking Sting
The Alexandria Police Department joined forces with the FBI for the operation.

Place Matters!
PLACE MATTERS is a national initiative designed to build the capacity of leaders and communities to identify and address social, economic, and environmental conditions that shape health and life opportunities. Begun in 2006, 19 PLACE MATTERS teams now work in 27 jurisdictions around the country to raise awareness of the fact that the spaces and places where people live, work, study, and play directly and indirectly affect health, and to improve these conditions through policy and systems change. In particular, because of persistent segregation in schools, neighborhoods, and workplaces, the spaces occupied by people of color tend to host a higher concentration of health risks relative to wealthier and whiter communities, while lacking geographic and financial access to health-enhancing resources.

Health Care Issues for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care and Kinship Care
Apolicy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics notes children and adolescents who enter foster care often do so with complicated and serious medical, mental health, developmental, oral health, and psychosocial problems rooted in their history of childhood trauma. Ideally, health care for this population is provided in a pediatric medical home by physicians who are familiar with the sequelae of childhood trauma and adversity. As youth with special health care needs, children and adolescents in foster care require more frequent monitoring of their health status, and pediatricians have a critical role in ensuring the well-being of children in out-of-home care through the provision of high-quality pediatric health services, health care coordination, and advocacy on their behalves. A technical report supports the policy statement.

Health and Social Service Needs of US-Citizen Children with Detained or Deported Immigrant Parents
Astudy by the Urban Institute and Migration Policy Institute found children with deported or detained immigrant parents face difficulty accessing early education, health care, and social services. The report lays out social-emotional, health-related, and financial hardships and obstacles that children face following a parent’s detention or deportation.

Juvenile Justice
Juvenile Court Statistics 2013
Areport released by the National Center for Juvenile Justice describes delinquency cases and petitioned status offense cases processed by courts with juvenile jurisdiction in 2013. The report also presents trends in delinquency cases since 1985 and in status offense cases since 1995. Data include case counts and rates, detailed by juvenile demographics and offenses charged. In 2013, courts handled nearly 1.1 million delinquency cases (down 44% from the peak in 1997). Twenty-eight percent of these cases involved females, 53% involved youth younger than 16, and 62% involved white youth.

Journal of Juvenile Justice
TheFall 2015 issuefeatures articles on substance use treatment programs for system-involved and at-risk youth, parenting stressors and family management techniques, stress-reduction training for juvenile justice officers, and truancy prevention. Other articles examine best practices for educating juvenile detainees about sexually transmitted diseases and employers’ perceptions of juvenile records.

Gender Injustice: System-Level Juvenile Justice Reforms for Girls
The National Crittenton Foundation, in partnership with the National Women’s Law Center, has released “Gender Injustice: System-Level Juvenile Justice Reforms for Girls.” The report presents research and data showing that, in the last two decades, girls’ presence in the juvenile justice system has increased at all stages of the process. Despite overall declining juvenile arrest rates, arrests for girls have increased by 45%. Court caseloads for girls have increased 40%. The number of girls in detention has increased 40%. Post-adjudication probation increased 44%, and post-adjudication placement increased 42%.

Locked In: Interactions with the Criminal Justice and Child Welfare Systems for LGBTQ Youth, YMSM, and YWSW Who Engage in Survival Sex
The Urban Institute has released a report that documents the cycle of involvement in the juvenile justice, criminal justice, and child welfare systems affecting youth who engaged in survival sex and are self-identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ); young men who have sex with men (YMSM); and young women who have sex with women (YWSW).

Workshops & Webinars

Partnership Between WIOA and TANF to Serve Youth (October 28, 2-3:30 p.m.)
In partnership with the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, the Division of Youth Services is hosting a webinar on ways in which WIOA and TANF programs can work together to create pathways for low-income youth in the workforce system.

Beyond Revenge: Practical Strategies for Prosecuting Image Exploitation (October 30, 3 – 4 p.m.)
Thewebinar presenter will explore strategies for prosecuting image exploitation cases involving the nonconsensual creation, possession, or distribution of an image or images depicting victims engaged in consensual sexual activity or being sexually assaulted.

Deconstructing Social Emotional Learning Practice (November 3, 2-3 p.m.)
The roundtable will focus on the value of creating a research-practice partnership with eight mature youth-serving organizations whose formal curricula prepare young people for everything from boat building to board membership and share very concrete definitions, frames and improvement data that emerged from the project.

Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series (Third Thursday of the Month, 1-2:15 p.m.)
MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership (MENTOR) is proud to facilitate the Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series, supported by The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and in partnership with the following Mentoring PartnershipsIndiana Mentoring Partnership, Kansas Mentors, the Mentoring Center of Central Ohio, the Institute for Youth Success (formerly Oregon Mentors), and the Mentoring Partnership of Southwestern Pennsylvania. Through ongoing planning and evaluation of the latest developments in the field, this team delivers a webinar each month focused on strengthening mentoring practice, sharing new resources, and helping the field put research into practice.

Embedding Youth Development in Schools: A Thought Leader Conversation (On Demand)
Karen Pittman and Michele Cahill, friends and fellow trailblazers in the field of youth work, sat down for an audio “roundtable” on how integrating youth development practices and design thinking can transform schools and learning. Karen and Michele co-founded the Center for Youth Development and Policy Research in 1990 and have been working to get systems ready for students ever since.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply