Dispatched

Alexandria Youth Topics November 9, 2015 Edition | Newsletter | Alexandria Center for Children and Families

Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families, Department of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria.  It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services.

Subscribe here. Make inquiries here. Youth Topics is posted online here.

In the November 9 Edition:

Events
November Events for Families (November)
National Homeless Youth Awareness Month (November)
Month of the Military Family (November)
Youth Mental Health First Aid (November 10 & 12)
Second Thursday Art Night (November 12)
Volunteers are the Heart of Alexandria (November 12)
Cider Press (November 12)
Health Fair (November 14)
ALIVE’s Empty Bowls Event (November 14)
Animal Camouflage w/Naturalist Jane Yeingst (November 14)
US National Road Race 12K (November 15)
Teen Time: Youth Voices Video Project (November 16)
Adult Mental Health First Aid (November 16 & 18; February 22 & 23; May 10 & 12)
Speak Up for Children (November 17)
STEMtivity: Make a Musical Instrument (November 17)
Explore the Natural World (November 18)
Women & Wine (November 18)
Wii Gaming (November 20)
Family Volunteer Day (November 21)
Carpenter’s Shelter Run for Shelter (November 22)
Paint, Draw, Color (November 28)
Alexandria Holiday Invitational Cheerleading Competition (December 5)
Second Chance Act and Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program National Conferences (December 14-18)
Holiday Sharing Community Toy Drive (December 18, 19)

Careers/Volunteerism
Super School Challenge
Access for Athletes
Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training Program
Live Your Dream Awards
Celebrating Solutions Awards
Terri Lynne Lokoff/Children’s TYLENOL National Child Care Teacher Awards
Gardner Leadership Award
Collaboration Grants for Mathematicians
Writing Fellowships
Research on Contemporary Issues
Practitioner Case Report Contest
Young Physicians Patient Safety Award
Volunteer Times

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities

Research & Resources
Governor Visits Patrick Henry to Announce Accreditation Results in Person
ACPS Sees Growth Along Predicted Trend Lines for 2015-16
Learn More About the Goals of ACPS 2020
Video: Learn About the Six New Goals of ACPS
Noah Lyles Names 2015 Track and Field Athlete of the Year

Education
Math NAEP Scores Drop for 4th and 8th Grades
Cyber Charters Have ‘Overwhelming Negative Impact’, CREDO Study Finds
Students Pitch Apps, Games in D.C. as Part of Hispanic Heritage Initiative
Prior Education Determines How Refugee ELLs Adjust to U.S. Schools
Resource Guide: Supporting Undocumented Youth
Classroom Biases Hinder Students’ Learning
Oak Foundation Aims to Aid Those With ‘Learning Differences’
Schools Seek to Diversify Gifted, Honors Classes
Still No African-Americans Taking the AP Computer Science Exam in Nine States
‘Maker Movement’ Brings New Energy to Out-of-School Science and Art
Schools, Youth Development Programs Seek to Engage Students in Career and Technical Education
USDA Sees 20 Percent Increase in Schools Offering Free Meals to Students
Every Student, Every Day: Obama Administration Launches First-ever National, Cross-Sector Initiative to Eliminate Chronic Absenteeism in Our Nation’s Schools
Study Measures Which Teaching Traits Boost Student Agency, Mindsets
Understanding and Addressing the Early Childhood Origins of “Mean” Behavior and Bullying: Resources for Practitioners
For Reading, Knowledge Matters More than Strategies, Some Experts Say
Program to Improve Teacher Diversity Will Offer Full College Scholarships
Parent-Teacher Conferences Get a Makeover
Why K-12 Data-Privacy Training Needs to Improve
Educators Hope Congress Provides Clarity, Support on Privacy Issues
Corruption Probe Muddies Efforts to Fix Detroit’s Schools
San Francisco Scrambles to Make Housing More Affordable for Teachers
Majority of Nevadans Seeking School Vouchers Live in Upscale Suburbs
In L.A., Tensions Rise Over Teacher-Misconduct Investigations
FBI, Justice Department Investigating S.C. Police Officer Who Threw Student Across Classroom
In Wake of Spring Valley, Teachers Share Ideas on De-Escalating Conflicts
District Defends Privacy Curtains for Transgender Girl
Vicki Phillips, Outgoing K-12 Director at Gates, Reflects on Her Tenure, Priorities

Youth Well-Being
The Adolescent Brain Subject of Long-Term Federal Study
Implementing Parenting Interventions in Early Care and Education Settings: A Guidebook for Implementation
High Quality Child Care is Out of Reach for Working Families
Do Afterschool STEM Programs Lead to Science Careers? Should They?
Uniting Sports and Therapy on One Field
New Toolkit Issued to Help Providers Measure Trauma with ACES Survey
Learning Community Supports Interagency Planning for Youth with Co-occurring Intellectual/Developmental Disorders and Mental Health Disorders
Diagnosis Lost: Differences Between Children Who Had and Who Currently Have an Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis
Journalism Resource Guide on Behavioral Health
Video: A Lesson in Humanity From Children’s Holocaust Diaries
Foster Care System Feels Shock Waves from Heroin Addiction
For Former Foster Kids, Moving Out of State Can Mean Losing Medicaid
2015 National Poll Finds More Than Four in Ten U.S. Adults Report Ever Trying Marijuana
Creating a Pipeline to Employment for Young Adults
ApprenticeshipUSA Toolkit
How About Implementing Positive Youth Development with Emerging Adults and Adults?
5 Resources to Support and Empower Teen Parents
Family-Based Approaches to Preventing Teen Dating Violence
Sex Trafficking Prevention: A Trauma-Informed Approach for Parents and Professionals
Ending Conversion Therapy: Supporting and Affirming LGBTQ Youth
Becoming a ‘Real Boy”: Filmmaker Follows Teen’s Trans Journey

Juvenile Justice
Parents Behind Bars: What Happens to Their Children?
Children with a Parent in Prison: The Forgotten Casualties
What Happens When Moms Go to Prison
Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents Training Video
Delinquency Cases in Juvenile Court, 2013

Workshops & Webinars
Every Student, Every Day: A Virtual Summit on Addressing and Eliminating Chronic Absence (November 12)
Best Practices for Engaging Opportunity Youth in Your Community (November 12)
Human Trafficking: Responses at the State and Local Level (November 17)
Managing Risk and Mental Health for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth (November 18)
No Safe Haven: Keeping Immigrants and Refugees Safe from Human Rights Violators (November 18)
Cross-Age Teaching in Out-of-School: An Approach to Social and Emotional Development (November 24)
Getting Beyond Negative Perceptions about Parents: Key Insights About Engaging Parents in Ending Chronic Absence (On Demand)

Events

November Events for Families
The Family and Community Engagement Center (FACE) of ACPS is offering a number of events for families during the month of November.

National Homeless Youth Awareness Month (November)
As many as 2.5 million youth per year experience homelessness. Along with losing their home, community, friends and routines, many homeless youth are victims of trauma as well as vulnerable to countless dangers while trying to survive on the street. In support of National Homeless Youth Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network has provided resources to help communities, families, educators, mental health and child welfare professionals, and policy makers and advocates better understand and deal with homeless youth.

Month of the Military Family
November is the Month of the Military Family. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has made available a number of resources, webinars, and links to partner organizations to support the well-being of the nation’s military families, including those with a service member currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces or those who have retired or separated.

Youth Mental Health First Aid (November 10 & 12)
Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) is being offered for adults responding to a youth in crisis. The training demonstrates the initial help given to a person showing signs of mental illness or a mental health crisis. The eight-hour course teaches risk factors, warning signs and symptoms of mental health and substance use disorders; the effects of the illnesses and an overview of treatments; and a five-step action plan for helping someone with symptoms. Classes are held at 4480 King Street, Room 514.

Second Thursday Art Night (November 12)
During the monthly event at the Torpedo Factory Art Center (6-9 p.m.), visitors can meet emerging artists during after-hours gallery openings and be among the first to see what archaeologists are digging up on Duke and Union.

Volunteers are the Heart of Alexandria (November 12)
The annual celebration by Volunteer Alexandria will be held at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (600 Dulany Street).

Cider Press (November 12)
The annual cider celebration in benefit of SCAN (Stop Child Abuse Now) is scheduled for 7 p.m. at Blackwall Hitch (5 Cameron Street). Featured will be craft hard ciders, appetizers, apple “games”, and a 50/50 raffle to benefit the charity.

Health Fair (November 14)
A free health fair will take place at Francis Hammond Middle School (4646 Seminary Road) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. In addition to free fitness and health workshops throughout the day, flu shots, glucose tests for diabetes, blood pressure tests, information on the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid and GAP, and help with applying for SNAP food assistance benefits will be available. Flyers are available in EnglishSpanish, and Amharic.

ALIVE’s Empty Bowls Event (November 14)
Empty Bowls is an international grassroots program that encourages local artists and organizations to work together to raise hunger awareness and help feed the hungry in their communities. Attendees will enjoy a simple, delicious meal together and receive a one-of-a-kind bowl handmade by students of the Arts Department of Northern Virginia Community College. The event is scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Durant Arts Center (1605 Cameron St.).

Animal Camouflage w/Naturalist Jane Yeingst (November 14)
Ages 3 and up with an adult can learn how animals disguise themselves to hunt and avoid detection. The event is from 3 – 4 p.m. at the Burke Branch Library (4701 Seminary Road).

US National Road Race 12K (November 15)
Open to runners of all abilities, the 12K race will feature specially designed medals for all finishers in all three races as well as age-group awards.

Teen Time: Youth Voices Video Project (November 16)
Ages 11-14 will create a one-minute video using the Adobe Voice app from 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. at the Burke Branch Library (4701 Seminary Road).

Adult Mental Health First Aid (November 16 & 18; February 22 & 23; May 10 & 12)
The training demonstrates the initial help given to a person showing signs of mental illness or a mental health crisis. The eight-hour course teaches risk factors, warning signs and symptoms of mental health and substance use disorders; the effects of the illnesses and an overview of treatments; and a five-step action plan for helping someone with symptoms.

Speak Up for Children (November 17)
SCAN will partner with Prevent Child Abuse in Virginia to host a training event that will help participants better understand the legislative process and learn how to be an effective advocate. The event is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. at the Fairfax South County Government Building (6350 Richmond Highway, Alexandria).

STEMtivity: Make a Musical Instrument (November 17)
Get creative with fun hands-on activities that explore science, technology, engineering, arts and math from 7 – 8 p.m. at the Beatley Branch Library (5005 Duke Street). Youth ages 8 and older will learn about sound and making musical instruments. Arrive early as space is limited to 20 participants.

Explore the Natural World (November 18)
A naturalist from the Buddie Ford Nature Center (who is frequently accompanied by live animals) will talk about the natural world from 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. at the Duncan Branch Library (2501 Commonwealth Avenue). The event is for grades K-5.

Women & Wine (November 18)
Proceeds of the event at the historic Lloyd House (220 North Washington Street) will benefit Space of Her Own. The event from 6 – 8:30 p.m. is for women 21 years and older who enjoy wine and are interested in getting to know other women in Alexandria. Tickets are $25.

Wii Gaming (November 20)
Ages 6-12 can participate in multi-player video games from 4 – 5 p.m. at the Beatley Branch Library (5005 Duke Street).

Family Volunteer Day (November 21)
Volunteer Alexandria is hosting a Family Volunteer Day from 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Families with youth ages 6-12 are invited to participate in the day of service. A variety of arts and crafts projects will be offered that will benefit children, seniors, and animals. Six different stations will be available to create items that will then be donated to nonprofits serving in Alexandria.

Carpenter’s Shelter Run for Shelter (November 22)
The Run for Shelter is dedicated to ending homelessness in the Northern Virginia area. The 10K is scheduled for 8 a.m. at the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (600 Dulany Street) followed shortly by starts for the 5K and 1 mile events.

Paint, Draw, Color (November 28)
At a drop-in event for all ages at the Duncan Branch Library from 11 a.m. to Noon, participants bring their imagination to create something with the art supplies provided.

Alexandria Holiday Invitational Cheerleading Competition (December 5)
The public is invited to attend the Alexandria Holiday Invitational Cheerleading Competition, scheduled for 11 a.m. at T.C. Williams High School (3330 King Street). The competition features youth cheerleading teams from Alexandria neighborhood recreation centers and other teams from the metropolitan area. Tickets are available for purchase at the door the day of the event: $10 for ages 13 and older and $5 for ages 5 – 12; ages 4 and under are admitted free. For information on the competition, additional recreation programs and activities, or to volunteer as a coach, call the Recreation Services Division Office at 703.746.5402.

Second Chance Act and Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program National Conferences (December 14-18)
The conference in Washington, D.C. will offer sessions that address evidence-based practices for reducing recidivism and improving outcomes for people with behavioral health needs who are involved with the criminal justice system.

Holiday Sharing Community Toy Drive (December 18, 19)
The community toy drive will take place at the Mt. Vernon Recreation Center (2701 Commonwealth Avenue). Volunteers are needed Friday evening, December 18 and Saturday morning, December 19 to unload, sort, and inventory toys. Volunteers will be needed Saturday afternoon, December 19, to assist parents in selecting toys for their children. Spanish speakers are encouraged.

Careers/Volunteerism

Super School Challenge
The Super School Challenge is an open call to reimagine and design the next American high school. In a time where technology is developing at unprecedented speeds, public schools have remained stagnant. The XQ challenge allows teams to unite and take on the important work of rethinking and building schools that prepare our students for the rigorous challenges of college, careers and life. Winning team concepts will be provided with expert support and a fund of $50 million to support at least five schools over the next five years to turn their ideas into real Super Schools.

Access for Athletes
The program of the Challenged Athletes Foundation is designed to reduce the financial impediments to participation in sports by physically challenged athletes. Grants of up to $5,000 will be awarded for the purchase of equipment such as sports wheelchairs, handcycles, mono skis, and sports prosthetics as well as resources for training and competition expenses. Applications must be received by December 4.

Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training Program
A two-year postdoctoral research fellowship program in psychiatric rehabilitation and vocational recovery from serious mental illnesses will begin April 1st, 2016 at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University. One of these fellowships will be focused on career development and employment success among transition-age youth and young adults (ages 14-30) with serious mental health conditions. Didactic seminars provided by the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University, an extensive research practicum and an annual stipend of $40,000 are included in the fellowship. Applications are due December 1. Contact Dr. Zlatka Russinova (617.353.3549) for additional information. Orientation phone discussions are recommended before submitting applications.

Live Your Dream Awards
Soroptimist International of the Americas is a global volunteer organization working to improve the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment. The organization’s Live Your Dream Award assist women who provide the primary source of financial support for their families by giving them the resources they need to improve their education, skills, and employment prospects. Recipients may use the cash awards to offset any costs associated with their efforts to attain higher education, such as books, childcare, tuition, and transportation. Local-level award recipients become eligible for regional awards of either $3,000 or $5,000. Regional award recipients are eligible to receive one of three international-level awards of $10,000. Applications are due November 15.

Celebrating Solutions Awards
The Mary Byron Project cultivates and supports efforts that extend beyond crisis management to attack the root causes of the domestic violence epidemic. The Project’s Celebrating Solutions Awards recognize organizations that demonstrate promise in breaking the cycle of intimate partner violence. Four awards of $10,000 are presented each year. An additional Roth Award of $10,000 recognizes one program that specifically addresses the needs of underserved populations. Programs that have been in operation for a minimum of three years are eligible for the awards. Nominations for Celebrating Solutions Awards must be postmarked by December 31; nominations for the Roth Award must be postmarked by January 31, 2016.

Terri Lynne Lokoff/Children’s TYLENOL National Child Care Teacher Awards
The Terri Lynne Lokoff/Children’s TYLENOL National Child Care Teacher Awards acknowledge the critical role of child care teachers in providing quality early care and education. Child care teachers from all 50 states and the District of Columbia and on U.S. military bases and installations around the world are eligible to apply for these awards. Applicants must be full-time child care teachers employed in a home, group, or center-based program for a minimum of three years and meet other eligibility guidelines. As part of the application process, teachers are asked to design an enhancement project for the children in their classroom or home, illustrating the educational, social, and emotional benefits from the project. Fifty selected teachers will each receive a $1,000 grant; $500 to create the project and $500 for the teacher’s personal use. Of the top ten recipients, one is selected to receive the Helene Marks Award, which includes an additional $1,000 grant. Applications must be postmarked by January 4, 2016.

Gardner Leadership Award
The award by Independent Sector recognizes a living American whose leadership in the nonprofit community has been transformative. Award recipients are individuals whose leadership has had national or international impact or, if at the regional level, has attracted wide recognition and imitation. Nominations are due February 1, 2016.

Collaboration Grants for Mathematicians
The goal of the program of the Simons Foundation is to support the “mathematical marketplace” by substantially increasing collaborative contacts between mathematicians. Each collaboration grant provides $7,000 a year for five years. An individual must have a Ph.D. and a tenure-track or tenured position, or be a professor emeritus at a U.S. institution of higher education. The deadline to apply is January 28, 2016.

Writing Fellowships
The Fine Arts Work Center in the historic art colony of Provincetown, Massachusetts awards seven-month writing fellowships to five poets and five fiction writers each year. Fellows are provided with a private furnished apartment and a monthly stipend of $750. Applicants must be emerging fiction writers or emerging poets. The deadline to apply is December 1.

Research on Contemporary Issues
The Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy was established in 1997 to support the advancement of research and understanding in the major fields of the social sciences,  including psychology, anthropology, sociology, economics, urban affairs, area studies, and political science. Preference is given to projects that address contemporary issues in the social sciences as well as issues of policy relevance. Grants are limited to aspiring Ph.D. students at the dissertation level whose project has received approval from their appropriate department head/university. Applicants may propose new projects or solicit support for research in progress. Applicants are not required to be citizens or residents of the United States. The deadline to apply is February 1, 2016.

Practitioner Case Report Contest
The Massage Therapy Foundation is inviting submissions for its 2014 Practitioner Case Report Contest, an annual opportunity for massage therapists and bodyworkers to develop research skills and enhance their ability to provide knowledge-based massage services to the public. The contest is open to students age 18 or older at the time of entry and enrolled in a minimum five-hundred-hour massage therapy program in the United States or abroad. Cash prizes of up to $2,500 each will be awarded for the best reports, along with stipends of up to $1,000 for the student winner and case report advisor to attend the 2017 American Massage Therapy Association to present the report’s findings. Entries must be submitted by June 1, 2016.

Young Physicians Patient Safety Award
The Doctors Company Foundation, in partnership with the Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation is accepting entries for an annual program that recognizes young physicians for their personal insight into the importance of applying the principles of patient safety to reduce the incidence of medical error. Individuals are invited to submit a 500 – 1,000 word essay about a transformative patient safety event they experienced personally during their clinical rotations. The essay should have an emotional impact on the reader and provide a lesson that is transferable to other medical students and medical professionals. Applicants must be a third- or fourth-year student in an American medical school. Six winners will each receive a $5,000 award. The deadline to apply is January 25, 2016.

Volunteer Times
Twenty-seven nonprofit organizations supporting and serving children, youth and adults came out to meet the residents of Potomac Yards. Read about the event in the November edition of Volunteer Times, the newsletter of Volunteer Alexandria.

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on October 28 and November 6.

Research & Resources

Governor Visits Patrick Henry to Announce Accreditation Results in Person
Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe visited staff and students at Patrick Henry Elementary School to personally congratulate them on their high performance this year. Fifteen out of sixteen schools within Alexandria City Public Schools earned state accreditation when this year’s results were announced. Patrick Henry earned full accreditation status by showing large gains in student achievement each of the past two years. T.C. Williams High School earned full accreditation after previously being accredited with warning for a single year in mathematics.   

ACPS Sees Growth Along Predicted Trend Lines for 2015-16
Alexandria City Public Schools (ACPS) is serving 503 more students in the 2016-17 school year (an increase of 3.6% over the previous school year), according to the ACPS fall enrollment report. The total of students enrolled with ACPS this school year is 14,670 students compared to 14,167 students last school year.   

Learn More About the Goals of ACPS 2020
ACPS 2020 is the Strategic Plan that will guide the direction of Alexandria City Public Schools over the next five years. Its focus is achieving six goals: academic excellence and educational equity; family and community engagement; exemplary staff; facilities and the learning environment; health and wellness; and effective and efficient operations.  

Video: Learn About the Six New Goals of ACPS
Information about each of the six goals of ACPS 2020 is featured in videos.  

Noah Lyles Names 2015 Track and Field Athlete of the Year
T.C. Williams senior Noah Lyles has been named 2015 Track and Field Athlete of the Year by the National Scholastic Athletics Foundation.   

Education
Math NAEP Scores Drop for 4th and 8th Grades
New data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress revealed U.S. 4th and 8th grade students are performing worse in math and somewhat worse in reading. The average score for 4th grade math declined by one point and the average score for 8th grade math went down two points. Fourth grade reading scores remained unchanged statistically from 2013 and 8th grade reading scores went down two points.

Cyber Charters Have ‘Overwhelming Negative Impact’, CREDO Study Finds
According to a new series of reports released by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes, students who take classes over the Internet through online charter schools make dramatically less academic progress than their counterparts in traditional schools.

Students Pitch Apps, Games in D.C. as Part of Hispanic Heritage Initiative
The Hispanic Heritage Foundation partnered with industry leaders to invite a group of 20 promising programming fellows from all over the country to the nation’s capital. Twenty young people ages between 15 to 25 won an annual competition conducted by the Hispanic Heritage Foundation’s Latinos On Fast Track program and the Entertainment Software Association (a trade association for the video game industry which also operates the prominent E3 tech convention). The fellows were required to submit an original video game or app that addressed social issues affecting their communities. The program is intended to inspire minorities, especially Hispanics, to enter and build networks in the burgeoning tech world.

Prior Education Determines How Refugee ELLs Adjust to U.S. Schools
According to an analysis by the Migration Policy Institute, the prior educational experiences of refugee children and not their academic aptitude may be the most significant indicator of how they will perform in U.S. schools.

Resource Guide: Supporting Undocumented Youth
A resource guide by the U.S. Department of Education outlines ways educators and others can help undocumented secondary and college students, from making them feel welcome in their communities to applying for financial aid.

Classroom Biases Hinder Students’ Learning
Classroom interactions that teachers intend to be inclusive can instead make students feel vulnerable if they are singled out based on race, disability, or income level. In a 2010 study, Georgia Southern University researcher Mary Anne Meeks tracked microaggressions (incidences of everyday discrimination that students encounter that may contribute to lower performance and disengagement) experienced by 342 students in a large, diverse high school over four years. Students reported they had experienced a majority of 21 types of microaggressions at least once during their high school careers, such as teachers assuming a black student was poor without asking, or acting surprised or giving outsize praise for being articulate.

Oak Foundation Aims to Aid Those With ‘Learning Differences’
The Geneva-based Oak Foundation, which has a U.S. Office in Chapel Hill, N.C., has invested more than $28 million over the past six years through its program to support children, youth, and adults with what it calls “learning differences”.

Schools Seek to Diversify Gifted, Honors Classes
Gifted and honors classes are often whiter and wealthier than their schools as a whole. In Elk Grove, a suburb of Sacramento, Calif., the school district has invested more than $860,000 in overhauling the gifted- and advanced-course procedures that unintentionally discriminate against poor and minority students. In the process, teachers and administrators are learning how to see students’ potential in new ways.

Still No African-Americans Taking the AP Computer Science Exam in Nine States
According to data from the College Board, the number of students taking the AP computer science exam increased by about 24% from last year – up to 46,000 U.S. students. Maryland was the state with the most test-takers overall by population. The number of female test-takers in computer science went up slightly over the year—but the group is still severely underrepresented at just 22%. The percentage of test-takers who were members of underrepresented minorities (that is, students who are not white or Asian) went up just half a percentage point, to 13%.

‘Maker Movement’ Brings New Energy to Out-of-School Science and Art
Maker Faire is a combination street festival and science fair where “makers’ of all ages and kinds show their stuff. The concept began in the San Francisco Bay area in 2006 and has spread around the country and overseas. According to the business technology magazine Fact Company, Maker Faires are expected to draw a total of 1 million people this year.

Schools, Youth Development Programs Seek to Engage Students in Career and Technical Education
Youth development programs such as SkillsUSA, which partners with thousands of schools across the country to prepare students for careers in technical, skilled and services fields, are working to engage students in CTE. Participants said SkillsUSA activities such as competitions, career fairs, and job shadowing exposed them to employers more often than other CTE students.

USDA Sees 20 Percent Increase in Schools Offering Free Meals to Students
The number of schools offering free meals to all students through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s community eligibility provision jumped 20% this year, the second year the option has been available nationwide. Under community eligibility, qualifying schools offer universal free meals without requiring any students to qualify through family-income verification. Districts have said that paperwork can be a hurdle that keeps otherwise eligible students from eating free or reduced-price meals. As a result, some students go hungry.

Every Student, Every Day: Obama Administration Launches First-ever National, Cross-Sector Initiative to Eliminate Chronic Absenteeism in Our Nation’s        Schools
The Administration announced new steps to combat chronic absenteeism, calling on states and local communities across the country to join in taking immediate action to address and eliminate chronic absenteeism by at least 10% each year, beginning in the current school year (2015-16). The initiatives is focused on the estimated 5 to 7.5 million students who are chronically absent each year.

Study Measures Which Teaching Traits Boost Student Agency, Mindsets
study released by the Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard University found the teaching skills required to ensure students are hopeful, engaged, and willing to endure through challenges differ from those skills required to boost gains in academic achievement. Teaching traits most linked to increased college aspirations in students are care and captivate, researchers found. A previous study by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation explored the same seven teaching traits as the Harvard study and found that totally different traits, challenge and classroom management, are linked to annual gains in academics.

Understanding and Addressing the Early Childhood Origins of “Mean” Behavior and Bullying: Resources for Practitioners
According to a report by Child Trends, the warning signs for bullying can begin to emerge even before the first day of school. The report looks at what the risk factors in early childhood are that might lead to bullying behaviors. One of the most unexpected findings was that exposure to television was related to later aggression and bullying, regardless of whether the nature of that content was inherently violent. Report findings are discussed in an interview with one of the authors.

For Reading, Knowledge Matters More Than Strategies, Some Experts Say
Improving reading comprehension is not about giving students good strategies, but increasing their knowledge about the world.

Program to Improve Teacher Diversity Will Offer Full College Scholarships
Howard County schools officials announced a new effort to improve workforce diversity, forging a partnership with McDaniel College that will provide full scholarships to low-income students who commit to three years of employment in the Maryland school system after graduation. Described by those involved as the first program of its kind, the initiative comes amid efforts by a number of school systems to improve the diversity of their teacher corps. Nationally, the percentage of minority students is far larger than that of minority teachers.

Parent-Teacher Conferences Get a Makeover
Academic parent-teacher teams (APTT) are one way educators are starting to reimagine the parent-teacher conference. The APTT model has spread to 250 schools in 16 states in the past five years. Georgia and four other states—Arizona, Florida, Montana, and Wisconsin—have launched grants for schools to train school staff members to create the teams. In Ruth Hill and other APTT schools, the first school meeting is long—75 to 90 minutes—and all parents meet together rather than individually. The teacher discusses the learning concepts that students must master by the end of the academic year and shows a chart of every child’s status on a key foundational skill, like subtraction or reading comprehension. The chart is anonymous, but each parent receives a packet that includes the identification code for his or her child to help them understand how their child performs in relation to peers. Parents then each set a 60-day goal for their child. The teacher models home activities to improve the skill, and parents work through them during the meeting. They also receive materials required for the activities to take home.

Why K-12 Data-Privacy Training Needs to Improve
Though efforts to safeguard the privacy of student data are expanding across the country, education experts are lamenting the lack of training opportunities for educators who need it for true protection. The push to restrict the growing $8.38 billion education technology industry from using personal information collected through educational sites, apps, and cloud services resulted in the introduction of 182 data-privacy bills in 46 states in 2015 alone. Fifteen of those states passed 28 laws.

Educators Hope Congress Provides Clarity, Support on Privacy Issues
The odds of a comprehensive federal law on student-data privacy being enacted anytime soon appear slim. Eight federal bills, amendments, or provisions related to student-data privacy have been introduced in 2015.

Corruption Probe Muddies Efforts to Fix Detroit’s Schools
A wide-ranging investigation of an alleged vendor kickback scheme could lead to federal indictments for an undetermined number of current and former officials of the Education Achievement Authority (a state-run district that operates the worst of the states’ lowest-performing schools) as well as employees in Detroit public schools.

San Francisco Scrambles to Make Housing More Affordable for Teachers
San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and school district leaders announced an affordable housing plan to improve teacher retention in the city. Mayor Lee’s plan seeks to provide opportunities for stable housing for educators through a variety of options. Besides financing a 100-unit housing complex for district educators, officials are developing a rental-assistance program. Other strategies to help keep teachers in the community include renewing Teacher Next Door (a federal loan-assistance program) and investing in Housing Navigators, a counseling program that connects teachers with eviction prevention services and other resources. “An investment in a teacher is an investment in the success of our City and the success of our young people,” Mayor Lee said in a press release.

Majority of Nevadans Seeking School Vouchers Live in Upscale Suburbs
Nevada passed a sweeping private school choice law last summer that basically allows any public school family to use their child’s per-pupil allotment from the state to attend a private school or home school instead. The state recently released data on the applications it has received for the program thus far, and a Las Vegas Sun analysis found that the majority of applicants are from Las Vegas’ wealthier suburbs while very few come from the inner city. Clark County Schools, which includes Las Vegas, is the state’s largest district and has the most private schools within its boundaries.

In L.A., Tensions Rise Over Teacher-Misconduct Investigations
A high-profile lawsuit filed this month charges that the Los Angeles school district has unfairly targeted veteran teachers on trumped-up claims of misconduct. It is being brought by nationally prominent teacher Rafe Esquith, who was recently fired by the school board after a district investigation leveled charges of personal misconduct. The exact charges have not been released, but the investigation had reportedly looked at, among other alleged improprieties, whether Esquith exchanged inappropriate emails with students and kept sexually explicit images on his school computer. He has repeatedly denied the accusations.

FBI, Justice Department Investigating S.C. Police Officer Who Threw Student Across Classroom
Federal authorities opened a civil rights investigation into a South Carolina incident depicted in videos showing a police officer throwing a high school student across a classroom.

In Wake of Spring Valley, Teachers Share Ideas on De-Escalating Conflicts
The incident that occurred at Spring Valley High School in South Carolina between a female student and a school resource officer raised tough questions on how teachers should handle uncooperative students in the classroom. In response, educators and experts across the nation have been sharing their input on how they would have handled this and similar situations.

District Defends Privacy Curtains for Transgender Girl
The superintendent of a suburban Chicago school district said installing curtains in the locker room for the student – who was born male and identifies as female – balances the privacy rights of other girls with the student’s wishes to be treated equally.

Vicki Phillips, Outgoing K-12 Director at Gates, Reflects on Her Tenure, Priorities
The head of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s K-12 grantmaking team announced she will step down at the end of 2015.


Youth Well-Being
The Adolescent Brain Subject of Long-Term Federal Study
The National Institutes of Health will dedicate $300 million over the next decade to launch the largest, most comprehensive study to date of how children’s brains develop during adolescence. The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study, or ABCD, will bring together researchers from nearly two dozen institutions across the country to track the development of 10,000 children ages 9 and 10 over the next decade.

Implementing Parenting Interventions in Early Care and Education Settings: A Guidebook for Implementation
guidebook provides program, state, and child care network leaders with an easy-to-use tool for selecting and implementing a parenting intervention. It can be used in different community-based settings and with the Compendium of Parenting Interventions recently developed by the Interagency Forum on Parenting and the Head Start National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement.

High Quality Child Care is Out of Reach for Working Families
paper by The Economic Policy Institute uses a number of benchmarks to gauge the affordability of child care across the country. One of the findings was the child care is particularly unaffordable for minimum-wage workers.

Do Afterschool STEM Programs Lead to Science Careers? Should They?
The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago has received a four-year, nearly $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to track youth who have taken part in two museum programs, Science Minors and Science Achievers.

Uniting Sports and Therapy on One Field
Doc Wayne, named after pediatric surgeon and sports enthusiast Dr. Eli Wayne, is a Boston area nonprofit that fuses sport and therapy to heal and strengthen youth through three programs: Chalk Talk sport-based group therapy, Global Life Empowerment youth leadership program and Therapeutic Sports Program, a competitive therapeutic league.

New Toolkit Issued to Help Providers Measure Trauma with ACES Survey
A new toolkit seeks to help services providers conduct a survey about traumatic childhood experiences that are linked to negative effects on health and well-being. The toolkit was developed by The National Crittenton Foundation and offers recommendations about the Adverse Childhood Experiences survey, including how to talk to children and parents about the survey, track results, and use the data for public education and policy advocacy.

Learning Community Supports Interagency Planning for Youth with Co-occurring Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities and Mental Health Disorders
Public systems confront obstacles when providing for children with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) who also have mental health or behavioral disorders. Because their needs are often not adequately addressed, these children and youth are at high risk for expensive and preventable out-of-home placements in foster care, juvenile detention and psychiatric institutions, and developmental disabilities centers. A report describes lessons gleaned from a Learning Community developed by Georgetown University’s National Technical Assistance for Children’s Mental Health to assist cross-agency teams and families in three states to improve care for this population.

Diagnosis Lost: Differences Between Children Who Had and Who Currently Have an Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis
According to findings published in the journal Autism, some children who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder go on to lose that diagnosis, but that change is not because of treatment or the child’s maturity. Instead, most of the parents of children who shed the autism label reported that health professionals made a different diagnosis—often attention deficit hyperactivity disorder—based on more information on the child’s behavior. The study found children who lost the autism diagnosis generally had fewer social or behavioral problems than children who retained the label. Their parents were also less likely to have had early concerns with their child’s verbal skills, or with their child making unusual or repetitive gestures, one hallmark of autism.

Journalism Resource Guide on Behavioral Health
Journalists will find a new resource, developed in part with funding and subject matter expertise from SAMHSA, a helpful tool when reporting stories that include individuals with behavioral health concerns. The Carter Center published the guide, which aims to increase accurate reporting of behavioral health issues, decrease stereotypes, and help reporters better understand mental health and substance use issues.

Video: A Lesson in Humanity From Children’s Holocaust Diaries
In the early 1990s, while working as a young researcher at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, Alexandra Zapruder came across children’s diary entries written during the Holocaust. Ten years later she would publish a collection of those entries titled Salvaged Pages: Young Writers’ Diaries of the Holocaust (Yale University Press). Education Week sat down with Zapruder to discuss how these children’s accounts of genocide resonate today as a powerful counterweight to dehumanizing stereotypes.

Foster Care System Feels Shock Waves from Heroin Addiction
According to the federal Administration for Children and Families, the number of children in foster care in the United States rose from 397,774 in 2012 to 415,129 in 2014, , reversing a seven-year downward trend. Heroin use in the United States has also increased dramatically. In the past 10 years it has more than doubled among young people ages 18 to 25. “The number of parents who are using heroin has skyrocketed,” said Judge Paula Sherlock, chief judge of the Jefferson Circuit Court in Louisville, Kentucky. Sherlock presides over family court, hearing two to four cases of child neglect or abuse each day. “This is my 11th year on the bench,” she said. In the first eight years, Sherlock barely heard the word “heroin” when she presided over child welfare cases.

For Former Foster Kids, Moving Out of State Can Mean Losing Medicaid
For former foster care youth, moving out of state can have serious consequences regarding their health care. Under the health law, young adults who age of out of the foster care system are eligible for free Medicaid coverage until they turn 26. The provision was an attempt to give them the same opportunity as other young people who can stay on their parents’ insurance until their 26th birthday. But these young adults are encountering a major barrier: They are only guaranteed coverage in the state where they were in foster care. States have the option of extending the benefit to all former foster youths, but only about a dozen have done so.

2015 National Poll Finds More Than Four in Ten U.S. Adults Report Ever Trying Marijuana
According to a telephone poll conducted in July 2015, 44% of U.S. adults have ever tried marijuana. When the question was first asked in 1969, only 4% of U.S. adults reported ever trying marijuana.

Creating a Pipeline to Employment for Young Adults
South Carolina’s Project HOPE (Health Occupations Preparation for Employment) is a career pathways program that helps low-income young people find and retain high-demand health care jobs.

ApprenticeshipUSA Toolkit
The resource provides tools on how to use apprenticeship in traditional fields such as construction or non-traditional industries such as IT or healthcare.

How About Implementing Positive Youth Development with Emerging Adults and Adults?
A growing number of evaluations suggest that positive youth development can improve youth outcomes. Positive youth development is defined by eight key elements: physical and psychological safety; supportive relationships; opportunities to belong; support for efficacy and mattering; positive social norms; opportunities for skill-building; appropriate structure, and integration of family, school, and community efforts. Because of the success of these approaches for youth, they could be effective for young adults and adults.

5 Resources to Support and Empower Teen Parents
A slideshow highlights five campaigns and organizations that emphasize the strengths and needs of young parents.

Family-Based Approaches to Preventing Teen Dating Violence
Researchers at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill created Families for Safe Dates to help parents and caregivers discuss dating abuse with their teens. Program participants receive six booklets of information and activities to walk through with their teens at home. Each booklet addresses a range of topics tied to healthy relationships, including how to recognize signs of dating abuse, handle conflict, and prevent unwanted sexual activity.

Sex Trafficking Prevention: A Trauma-Informed Approach for Parents and Professionals
A trafficking survivor shares personal and professional insights, and walks readers through the basics of trafficking and the role of trauma before, during, and after a young person is sexually exploited.

Ending Conversion Therapy: Supporting and Affirming LGBTQ Youth
The purpose of the SAMHSA report is to provide mental health professionals and families with accurate information about effective and ineffective therapeutic practices related to children’s and adolescent’s sexual orientation and gender identity. Specifically, this report addresses the issue of conversion therapy for minors. The conclusions are based on professional consensus statements arrived at by experts in the field. Specifically, conversion therapy—efforts to change an individual’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression—is a practice that is not supported by credible evidence and has been disavowed by behavioral health experts and associations. Conversion therapy perpetuates outdated views of gender roles and identities as well as the negative stereotype that being a sexual or gender minority or identifying as LGBTQ is an abnormal aspect of human development. Most importantly, it may put young people at risk of serious harm.

Becoming a ‘Real Boy”: Filmmaker Follows Teen’s Trans Journey
An upcoming documentary follows a transgender teen finding his way in a new world while trying to preserve the family ties his transition has strained.

Juvenile Justice
Parents Behind Bars: What Happens to Their Children?
An analysis by Child Trends concluded more than five million U.S. children have had a parent in prison. After accounting for effects associated with demographic variables such as race and income, parental incarceration was found to be associated with a higher number of other major, potentially traumatic life events—stressors that are most damaging when they are cumulative; more emotional difficulties, low school engagement, and more problems in school, among children ages 6 to 11; and a greater likelihood of problems in school among older youth (12 to 17).

Children with a Parent in Prison: The Forgotten Casualties
Those who are poor, black and/or live in rural areas are more likely to see a parent imprisoned. Children with an incarcerated parent may need extra support, and schools can make efforts to identify such children and monitor their progress.

What Happens When Moms Go to Prison
While men make up 99% of the U.S. prison population, the number of women and mothers involved in the criminal justice system has grown significantly over the last 20 years.

Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents Training Video
The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) have released a new training video providing an introduction to law enforcement agencies on safeguarding children of arrested parents. The video outlines strategies to help law enforcement agencies implement a trauma-informed approach to safeguard children before, during, and after the arrest of a parent. The video aligns with the IACP/BJA Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents Model Policy, which identifies policies and procedures that law enforcement can develop to minimize trauma to children during a parental arrest.

Delinquency Cases in Juvenile Court, 2013
fact sheet released by OJJDP presents statistics on delinquency cases handled in U.S. juvenile courts between 1985 and 2013. Estimates are based on data from more than 2,400 juvenile courts with jurisdiction over 84% of the U.S. juvenile population. In 2013, juvenile courts handled nearly 1.1 million delinquency cases involving juveniles charged with criminal law violations. Data on public order, person, and property offenses and drug law violations by age, gender, and race are included, as well as rates of dismissal, detention, waivers to criminal court, and adjudication and disposition.

Workshops & Webinars

Every Student, Every Day: A Virtual Summit on Addressing and Eliminating Chronic Absence (November 12, 2 – 3:30 p.m.)
The online session will provide communities and school districts with solutions and strategies towards eliminating the achievement gap, increasing attendance and ending absenteeism, particularly among at-risk youth.

Best Practices for Engaging Opportunity Youth in Your Community (November 12, 3-4 p.m.)
Opportunity youth – also referred to as disconnected youth – are the 5.6 million 16-24 year olds who are not in school and not employed. Research shows young men of color are disproportionally likely to be disconnected from school and work. A webinar sponsored by My Brother’s Keeper and Opportunity Youth will present powerful new data on the racial composition of disconnected youth and how many live in each city, the economic and social cost of inaction, and effective strategies for helping disconnected youth navigate a path to productive adulthood.

Human Trafficking: Responses at the State and Local Level (November 17, 3-4 p.m.)
More than half of all states have enacted safe harbor laws to ensure that children are not prosecuted for actions their traffickers forced them to take. The webinar will focus on safe harbor laws as they relate to youth who have run away from home. Presenters will highlight how communities such as Denver are collaborating with anti-trafficking groups to provide support for survivors who have run away from home.

Managing Risk and Mental Health for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth (November 18, 1-2 p.m.)
Research indicates that the old adage of “doing the time for the crime” does not have an appreciable impact on re-offending. This is particularly the case for young offenders. Justice agencies will have more success if they base their intervention decisions on some essential characteristics of the offender; namely, the level of risk for re-offending and specific criminogenic needs (risk factors that can change over time). The webinar will begin with an overview of the characteristics of risk assessment instruments and Risk-Needs-Responsivity (RNR). Also reviewed will be the results from a multi-site quasi-experimental study of the impact implementing risk assessment in six juvenile probation offices on case management decisions and re-offending.

No Safe Haven: Keeping Immigrants and Refugees Safe from Human Rights Violators (November 18, 2 – 3 p.m.)
The webinar will explore law enforcement’s role in keeping immigrants and refugees safe from human rights violators who persecuted them overseas and are now living in the United States.

Getting Beyond Negative Perceptions About Parents: Key Insights About Engaging Parents in Ending Chronic Absence (On Demand)
California Attorney General Kamala Harris recently commissioned a study to better understand parents’ perceptions on the issue of attendance; determine the barriers and obstacles that parents face in getting their children to school; and learn how we might engage rather than ignore or alienate parents. Ben Chida and Jill Habig from Attorney General Harris’ Office will join us to share findings of this study, conducted through focus groups of parents across the state. The Q&A session is also available.

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