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Youth Topics (January 6 Edition) | Newsletter | Center for Children and Families

 

YT Banner Crop LeftDepartment of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria. It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services.

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In the January 6 Edition:

Events
January Events for Families
Art Uniting People Exhibition (through March 9)
FAFSA 101 For Seniors and Parents (January 9)
Culinary Arts Program Information Session (January 11 or January 13)
SCAN Volunteer Orientation (January 12)
Adolescent Health and Well-Being Workshop: How Do You Measure Success (January 14)
2ndThursday Art Night at the Torpedo Art Center (January 14)
National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (January 25-31)
How to Keep My Volunteers (January 27)
Kindergarten Open Houses (January 27 – April 27)
Service to Justice Conference (January 29-30)
U Street, The Musical (January 29, 30; February 5, 6)
Coalition for Juvenile Justice Annual Conference (April 20-23)
National Reduce Tobacco Use Conference (April 25-26)

Careers/Volunteerism
Youth Philanthropy Projects
International Young Eco-Hero Award Program
Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
Columbia Medical Center Summer Program for Underrepresented Students
Hearst Fellowship for Minority Students
Elaine Chapin Fund Scholarship Program
Call for Abstracts for Teen Pregnancy Prevention Conference
Farmer Veteran Fellowship Fund
Mission Continues Post-9/11 Veteran Nonprofit Fellowships
Emergency Financial Assistance for Veterans
National Missing Children’s Day Poster Contest
Family and Youth Services Bureau Mural Contest
Grit Fund for Baltimore Artists
Ucross Foundation Artists Residencies
University at Buffalo Residency Programs for Artists and Performers
Houston Center for Contemporary Craft Residencies
Indian Arts Research Center Invites Applications for Residency Fellowships
Summer Residency Fellowships in Giverny, France
Support for Women Artists
Music Therapy Association Scholarship
Education Conference Grants
Macy Foundation Faculty Scholars Program
Medical Scholars Program
David E. Rogers Award
Hispanic Children & Families Research Fellowship
Yale LGBT Studies Research Fellowship
Pilot Psychiatry Research Awards
Patient Care Research Projects
Bioscience Research Projects
Teacher-Scholar Awards in Chemical Sciences
Award for Early Career College Faculty
Research on Generosity/Philanthropy
Mary Byron Project Roth Award
Red Ribbon Award
Wilbur Awards
Volunteer Times
SAPCA November Newsletter

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities

Research & Resources
Maury Sets World Record for Cup Stacking
“Remember the Titans”Coaches to Be Honored alongside Five Alexandria Athletes in Hall of Fame Ceremony
Alexandria Schools: Bursting at the Seams
School Board Approves CIP Budget that Conveys Urgency of Capacity Issues
ACPS Set to Modernize Parker-Gray Stadium
Patrick Henry Community Advisory Group Introduced
A Reminder How to Stay Connected During an Emergency

Education
Education at a Glance 2015: OECD Indicators
Most States Have Cut School Funding, and Some Continue Cutting
Public School Teacher Autonomy in the Classroom Across School Years 2003-04, 2007-08, and 2011-12
America’s Best (and Worst) Cities for School Choice
Newark Launching Community Schools with Facebook Money
Education Department Approves Teacher-Equity Plans for Eight States, Puerto Rico
Investing in Educator Capacity: An Analysis of State Race to the Top Spending
Head Start, Child Care See Boosts Under Congressional Budget Deal
President Signs ESEA Rewrite, Giving States, Districts Bigger Say on Policy
Will ESSA Trigger Significant Layoffs at the Education Department?
Why the ESEA Bill Seeks a Pardon for Heavyweight Black Boxer Jack Johnson
How Woodrow Wilson Denied African-Americans an Academic Education

Arne Duncan Calls for Addressing Gun Violence in Final Speech as Education Secretary
Five Factors Leaders Consider Before Closing Schools to Respond to Threats
NYC Mayor Signs Bill to Pay for Security at Private Schools
Safe2Tell
News Clip Shows Students Disarming Shooters. Do Schools Teach That?
Three Years After Newtown, Schools Broaden Their Definition of Safety
Family Sues After Police Question 3rd Grader for Hours
Town Denies it Detained 3rdGrader Over False Accusation
Five 5th Grade Students Suspended After Plotting Attack
Mother of Sikh Student Asks Bomb Threat Charges Be Dropped
Irving Teen Ahmed Mohamed Seeks $15 Million in Damages for Clock Incident

Positive Mindset May Prime Students’ Brains for Math
STEM Funding Streams Expanded in NCLB Rewrite
Social Media Campaigns Push Students to Consider Becoming Engineers
Tell Young Women to Be the Nerd, Not Date the Nerd, Says Facebook CEO
Unlocking the Code
Genealogy Camp Draws Kids Into STEM Experiential Learning, Thanks to Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Arizona District Teaches Coding to K-8 Students
Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education
Digital Rights Group Alleges Google Invades Student Privacy

California Suspension Rates Continue to Drop as State Changes Policy on Defiance
Why Some LAUSD Teachers are Balking at a New Approach to Discipline Problems
The Impact of Teacher Demographic Representation on Student Attendance and Suspensions
Nearly 9 in 10 Music Teacher Candidates Are White, Research Shows
In Denver, Charters and District Team Up on Special Education
Chicago Teachers Authorize Strike But Any Walkout Months Off
School Facilities Fuel State-Local Tensions in West Virginia District
Austin Board Hires Marketing Firm to Fend Off Charter Competition
Cities Look at Subsidized Housing to Stem Teacher Shortages

ESEA Rewrite Could Serve as ‘Huge Civil Rights’ Bill for ELLs, Some Advocates Say
“East of Salinas”
For Some Immigrant Students, Culture Bears on College Choice
Giving English Language Learners the Time They Need To Succeed
How Many Superintendents are Former English-Language Learners?

Kaplan Test Prep Survey: Majority of Students May Be Taking the SAT® Instead of the ACT® for the Wrong Reasons
College Scout Mines Below-the-Radar Schools for Diverse Talent
Using Dual Enrollment to Improve the Educational Outcomes of High School Students
National Graduation Rate Increases to All-Time High of 82%
Sealing the Cracks: Using Graduation Data, Policy, and Practice to Keep All Kids on Track
DC Public School Students Now Have City Library Cards
Tennessee’s State-Run District Runs Into Political Trouble
Tennessee Free-Tuition Program Moves Focus to College Retention
Academic Ladder is Extending for More Young Adults

Youth Well-Being
The Raising of America
Exposure to Toxic Stress in Childhood Linked to Risky Behavior and Adult Disease
PIONEER Study (Caregiver Prioritizing Outcomes, Needs, Expectations and Recovery)
The Arts in Early Childhood: Social and Emotional Benefits of Arts Participation
The Earlier the Better: Developmental Screening for Connecticut’s Young Children
Resources for Assessing Kindergartners
Dyslexia Signs Can Show Up Before Early Reading
Parent-Driven Group Wields Influence on Dyslexia Concerns

Opportunity, Responsibility, and Security: A Consensus Plan for Reducing Poverty and Restoring the American Dream
Single Parents Raising More than a Third of U.S. Kids
Young Children with Active-Duty Parents
Unaccompanied Children Crossing Southern Border in Greater Numbers Again, Raising Fears of New Migrant Crisis
Low-Income Latino Families Are More Financially Stable and Less Likely to Participate in Government Assistance Programs

How Much Do Toddlers Know About Logic?
Can 2-Year-Olds Understand What Other People Want?
Infants and Toddlers in the District of Columbia: A Statistical Look at Needs and Disparities
Use of Child Care Subsidies in Maryland
Cleveland Preschool Quality-Improvement Effort Reports Early Gains
Many Turned Away from State’s Preschool Program
Website Spotlights Programs Using Technology to Support Early Literacy
Toddlers Gain Touch-Screen Skills Early, Study Finds
Is a Digital Device in Your Child’s Future This Holiday Season?

Artistic Collaboration: Transforming Youth and Youth Justice by Integrating Arts
Ferguson Puts Chess in Schools to Help Students
Cultivating Young Chess Masters in Some of St. Louis’ Poorest Schools
How Afterschool Programs Can Impact Kids’ Screen Time
Ready for Work? How Afterschool Programs Can Support Employability Through Social and Emotional Learning
Muslim Youth Treated as Outsiders, Face Hostility: Youth Programs Respond
‘Teenager’s Handbook’Advises: Reach Across the Divide, Get Informed about Islam
Make Schools Welcoming for Muslims, Refugee Students, Ed. Dept. Urges
It’s Time to Talk: How to Start Conversations about Racial Inequities
The Path Forward: Improving Opportunities for African American Students
Accelerating Pathways
Revisiting Youth Apprenticeships
Keeping Young Adults Connected and Supported
Bill Would Give Former Foster Youth Early Access to Tax Credit
Helping First-Generation College Students Succeed

A Snapshot of Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Programs for Youth
Mindfulness: Helping Youth Learn to Feel Emotions and Choose Their Behavior
Database Helps Youth Workers Find Activities for Support Groups
Payoffs for California College Students and Taxpayers from Investing in Student Mental Health
If Tennessee Expanded Medicaid, Mental Health Department Could Save $40M
Investing to Improve the Well-Being of Vulnerable Youth and Young Adults
California High School Health Clinic Asks Students about Childhood Trauma to Improve Their Health
Teach Mental Health in Primary Schools, Advisory Group Says

Great Starts with Breakfast Survey Report
Mayo Clinic Finds Link Between Youth Contact Sports and Brain Disease
Parents for Healthy Schools Website
Portal de Informacion de Salud de NIH
Resources to Put Youth and Doctors More At-Ease Talking About Sexual Health
The Role of Research in Promoting Social Change: Teen Pregnancy Prevention as a Case Study
Sex Education Programs Fall Short of CDC Recommendations in Many States
Reducing Teen Substance Misuse: What Really Works
Smoking Most Prevalent Mode of Lifetime Marijuana Use Among Adults; 30% Report Consuming in Edibles and 10% Report Vaporizing
E-Cigarette Advertising Reaches 70 Percent of Middle and High Schoolers, CDC Says
Unspoken Truths: Young People in Recovery

Head of LA’s New Office of Child Protection Sees Big Challenge With No Specific Authority
Social Service Programs that Foster Multiple Positive Outcomes
What Makes Youth in Foster Care More Likely to Run Away?
Finding Creative Ways to Engage Homeless Youth
Youth Homelessness Has Dropped, Feds Report (But It’s Complicated)
6 Questions to Identify Youth at Highest Risk of Long-Term Homelessness
Family Finding Helps Homeless Young People Connect to Caring Adults
Does the Home Free Program Affect Family Dynamics, Communication?
HHS Could Do More to Support States’ Efforts to Keep Children in Family-Based Care

Juvenile Justice
Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit
The Amber Advocate
In Many States, Prospects are Grim for Incarcerated Youths
Zero Tolerance: How States Comply with PREA’s Youthful Inmate Standard
Justice Department Issues Guidance on Identifying and Preventing Gender Bias in Law Enforcement Response to Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence

Workshops & Webinars
Cultural Neuroscience: Closing the Gap in Population Mental Health Disparities (January 8)
Utilizing a Flipped Classroom to Train Teen Teachers (January 13)
An Overview of Current Research and Implementation Best Practices in Wraparound (January 19)
Parental Arrest Policies and Protecting Children: Training Your Department (January 20)
Increasing College & Career Readiness through Afterschool & Competency-Based Learning (On Demand)

Events

January Events for Families
The FACE Center of ACPS is offering a number parent engagement and support activities during the month of January.

Art Uniting People Exhibition (through March 9)
Theart exhibitionfeatures the work of artists and community members whose lives have been directly or indirectly affected by mental illness, addiction, or developmental and intellectual disorders. Art will be on display until March 9 at the Durant Arts Center (1605 Cameron Street).

FAFSA 101 For Seniors and Parents (January 9)
ACPS seniors and their parents/guardians are invited to join the Scholarship Fund for tips on how to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); access grant monies as well as interpret and evaluate available grants/loans; differentiate between the various types of loan repayment options, and review actual financial aid award packages received by graduates of T.C. Williams. The workshopis scheduled for 8:30 – 11 a.m. at T.C. Williams (3330 King Street).

Culinary Arts Program Information Session (January 11 or January 13)
The Culinary Arts Program of the City of Alexandria Workforce Development Center is hosting information sessions at 1900 N. Beauregard Street, Suite 300. Both sessions begin at 10 a.m.

SCAN Volunteer Orientation (January 12)
Orientations for those who seek to be a volunteer for SCAN (a non-profit organization whose mission is to promote the well-being of children, improve parent-child relations, and prevent child abuse and neglect) will take place at the new SCAN office – 205 S. Whiting Street, Suite 205. The orientation sessionof January 12 will begin at Noon.

Adolescent Health and Well-Being Workshop: How Do You Measure Success (January 14)
The hands-on workshopwill help participants sharpen their skills in evaluating program effectiveness. The workshop is from 9 – 10:30 a.m. at the Health Department (4480 King Street, 5thFloor Conference Room).

2nd Thursday Art Night at the Torpedo Art Center (January 14)
Theeventfrom 6 – 9 p.m. will feature live music, gallery openings, and the opportunity to experiment with printmaking.

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (January 25-31)
The annual, week-long observance brings together teens and scientific experts to shatter persistent myths about substance use and addiction. New toolkitsprovide event holders with resources to tailor activities to the specific drugs that most affect their communities. A general toolkit in Spanish is also available.

How to Keep My Volunteers (January 27)
The free workshopfrom 8 – 10 p.m. shares ways to engage volunteers to their full capacity. Hosted by Volunteer Alexandria, the workshop will take place at their offices (123 N. Alfred Street).

Kindergarten Open Houses (January 27 –April 27)
ACPS is hosting kindergarten open houses at Mount Vernon, Jefferson-Houston and George Mason Elementary Schools. Registration is required.

Service to Justice Conference (January 29-30)
The theme of the event is “History of Racism and Its Impact on the Social Services Industry”. The conferencewill take place at Luther Place Memorial Church (1226 Vermont Avenue N.W.).

U Street, The Musical (January 29, 30; February 5, 6)
The focus of the production is homelessness in America. It is the fifth in a series of social commentary musicals created by ARHA in partnership with the Recreation Department and ACPS. Showtime is 7 p.m. on Fridays, and 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Saturdays at the Richard Kaufman Auditorium (Lee Center, 1108 Jefferson Street).

Coalition for Juvenile Justice Annual Conference (April 20-23)
Theconferencetheme is “Redefining Leadership: Engaging Youth, Communities, and Policymakers to Achieve Better Juvenile Justice Outcomes.” Sessions will focus on the latest research, developments, and challenges for achieving the best outcomes for youth and families involved in the juvenile justice system. The conference site is the Washington Hotel. Early bird registration ends January 15.

National Reduce Tobacco Use Conference (April 25-26)
Theconference hosted by the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth will showcase the latest in tobacco-use prevention, reduction, and cessation for youth and young adults. The conference site is the Crystal Gateway Marriot.

Careers/Volunteerism

Youth Philanthropy Projects
Start a Snowball, Inc. encourages youth to engage in philanthropic and community service activities. To help kick off their philanthropy efforts, Start a Snowball awards $100 in seed funding for projects taken on by individuals or organizations. To be eligible, projects must be led by youth between the ages of 5 and 18. There is no deadline.

International Young Eco-Hero Award Program
An initiative of Action for Nature, the award recognizes and rewards successful individual environmental initiatives of young people ages 8 to 16 from around the world. Winners receive public recognition, cash prizes, and certificates. Applications must be received by February 28.

Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
Tomorrow’s Black Men is a 501(c)(3) organization that promotes the professional and personal growth of young males by sponsoring initiatives that enhance self-esteem and develop readiness and self-help skills. The Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship was established in 2010 to reward qualifying African-American high school males who have shown leadership academically as well as in the community. Multiple scholarships will be awarded to African-American males graduating in 2016 at three levels: $500, $1,000, and $2,500. Applications must be received by March 15.

Columbia Medical Center Summer Program for Underrepresented Students
The annual internship program is designed to expand the pool of medical and biomedical research applicants from diverse and economically disadvantaged groups whose members have been underrepresented in medicine and biomedical research, including African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders. Each student is matched with a mentor on the Columbia faculty who specializes in his or her field of interest. In addition to specific training in their research area of interest, students receive in-depth training in biomedical research methodology (including design and analysis of experiments); critical reading of scientific literature; presentation of scientific results at laboratory meetings; preparation of posters, abstracts, and manuscripts; and career counseling. Housing accommodations at Columbia’s Morningside Heights campus can be arranged for a fee payable by the program participant. Financial support for housing accommodations is subject to funding availability. No meal plan is provided. A $4,000 stipend is provided for living expenses beyond the cost of housing. Applicants must have a 3.0 grade point average or better, and be interested in an academic career in biomedical research. The deadline is February 5.

Hearst Fellowship for Minority Students
The Aspen Institute Program on Philanthropy and Social Innovation in Washington, D.C., is accepting applications for the summer session of its William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship program. Based on academic excellence and need, the fellowship is open to both undergraduate and graduate students of color. The Hearst Fellow serves as an intern with the Program on Philanthropy and Social Innovation in the Washington, D.C., office of the Aspen Institute. To be eligible, applicants must be a highly motivated, current, non-graduating graduate or undergraduate student from an underrepresented community of color. The summer fellow must be able to work as an intern full-time for twelve to fifteen weeks in Washington, D.C. All travel and housing costs must be covered by the student. A fellowship stipend of approximately $2,000 will be awarded for the summer session. Applications must be received by March 11.

Elaine Chapin Fund Scholarship Program
The program supports the postsecondary education of students affected by multiple sclerosis, either directly or as a family member of someone with MS. A minimum of eight $1,000 scholarships for the fall 2016 semester will be awarded. Applicants must be a U.S. citizen who plans to enroll or is enrolled in an undergraduate course of study at an accredited two or four-year college, university, or vocational/technical school in the U.S. The deadline to apply is April 30.

Call for Abstracts for Teen Pregnancy Prevention Conference
Abstracts are now being accepted for the 2016 HHS Teen Pregnancy Prevention Grantee Conference in Baltimore (July 19-21). With the theme Connecting the Dots: Collaborating to Achieve Lasting Impacts for Youth, the focus will be ways federal grantees can strengthen teen pregnancy prevention and sexual health programs through collaboration. Abstracts must be submitted electronically no later than January 20.

Farmer Veteran Fellowship Fund
Through its Farmer Veteran Fellowship Fund, the Farmer Veteran Coalition provides direct assistance to veterans starting out in farming or ranching. In addition to monetary awards, the fellowship provides support in the form of guidance with respect to production, business planning, and marketing. Awards are also made in the form of scholarships for coursework in agriculture at a college, university, or farm-training program. To be eligible, applicants must have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, currently be on active-duty or serving in the military reserve/National Guard; be members of FVC; and have an honorable discharge (other characters of discharge may be accepted on a case-by-case basis). In addition, applicants must have an agricultural business in operation. The deadline to apply is February 1.

Mission Continues Post-9/11 Veteran Nonprofit Fellowships
The Mission Continues empowers veterans facing the challenge of adjusting to life at home to find new missions. The organization’s fellowship program empowers post-9/11 veterans to volunteer with nonprofit organizations in their communities on a daily basis. The fellowships require twenty hours of service per week for twenty-six weeks at a local nonprofit organization. Fellows are encouraged to choose an organization based on their own personal passions. Applicants must have served in the United States military after September 11, 2001; attained an honorable discharge after a minimum of twenty-four months of military service (unless serious injury was sustained, preventing further service); and have a clean criminal record. Applications must be received by January 11.

Emergency Financial Assistance for Veterans
Veterans of Foreign Wars is accepting applications from active and discharged military service members who have been deployed in the last six years and have run into unexpected financial difficulties as a result of deployment or other military-related activity. The Unmet Needs Program provides financial assistance of up to $5,000 to assist with basic life needs in the form of a grant rather than a loan, so no repayment is required. Eligible expenses include housing and vehicle payments; utility and phone bills; food and incidentals; children’s clothing, food, diapers, school, and childcare; and medical bills, prescriptions, and eyeglasses. The hardship must be the result of deployment, a military pay issue, or military-related illness or injury. The Unmet Needs Disaster Assistance program also provides grants of up to $500 to active service members and veterans who have been forced to vacate their primary residence due to a state-declared natural disaster. Applications are accepted year-round.

National Missing Children’s Day Poster Contest
OJJDP invites fifth graders to participate in the 2016 National Missing Children’s Day poster contest. The annual contest creates an opportunity for schools, law enforcement, and child advocates to discuss the issue of missing and/or exploited children with youth, parents, and guardians and to promote child safety. Submissions are due by March 16.

Family and Youth Services Bureau Mural Contest
Grantees of Runaway and Homeless Youth Program of the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) are asked to engage young people in an opportunity to tell their stories. Winning agencies receive a gift card to buy art supplies to make the mural a reality. Entries will be judged on the role of young people in crafting an agency’s mural sketch and narrative as well as the meaningfulness and creativity of the design. A slideshow of 2015 mural submissions provides inspiration. Request an application (due January 29) by contacting Joelle Ruben.

Grit Fund for Baltimore Artists
The Grit Fund, which is administered by the Contemporary art museum in Baltimore, supports unincorporated and collaborative artist-organized activity that contributes significantly to the city’s arts landscape but seldom qualifies for traditional funding. Funded activities can include but are not limited to exhibitions, publications, public events, public art, film screenings, the ongoing work of an existing arts venue or collective, and the founding of a new arts venue or collective. The fund will provide eight to twelve grants of up to $6,000 in 2016. Online applications are due January 29. A series of information sessions and free workshops will be held on January 12 and January 23.

Ucross Foundation Artists Residencies
The Ucross Foundation provides uninterrupted time, work space, and living accommodations at its campus in Sheridan, Wyoming for approximately eighty-five visual artists, writers, and composers each year. Previous residents have come from every state in the U.S. as well as from many countries, including Germany, France, Scotland, England, Poland, Egypt, the Netherlands, Canada, and Thailand. Residencies vary in length from two to six weeks from late-February to mid-June. At any one time, there are up to nine individuals in residence comprising a mix of visual artists, writers, and composers. In most cases, studios are separate from living quarters. Lunch and dinners are prepared Monday to Friday by a professional chef. Residents are responsible for providing their own working materials and for their travel to Sheridan, Wyoming. There is no charge for a residency. Artists, writers, and composers from around the United States and the world, in all stages of their professional careers, are invited to apply to work on individual or collaborative projects. The deadline is March 1.

University at Buffalo Residency Programs for Artists and Performers
University at Buffalo established the Creative Arts Initiative in order to provide artists and performers with opportunities to take up residencies in Buffalo. Residencies should be used to create new works or complete works in progress. To that end, each artist-in-residence will receive an honorarium, access to workspace, performance and/or gallery space, and an invitation to interact with the community through workshops, classes, exhibitions, performances, lectures, and/or public art projects appropriate to the artist’s particular medium and project. Proposed budgets may range from $3,500 for a short-term project to $60,000 for a project of greater duration and complexity. Companies and collaborating artists are eligible to apply as are emerging and established artists. Proposals are being accepted for residencies as short as a few days to up to four months. Artists in all fields are eligible to participate, including music, film, plastic arts, visual arts, drama, writing, architecture, and so-called emerging disciplines. Applications must be received by March 1.

Houston Center for Contemporary Craft Residencies
Five to ten residencies of three to twelve months each will be awarded by the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft to craft artists working in wood, glass, metal, fiber, clay, and mixed media. Each artist will receive a $500 monthly stipend and a $300 quarterly housing/materials allowance. The residency also provides twenty-four-hour access to two-hundred-square-foot artist studios equipped with sinks, telephones, and wireless Internet access. In addition, fellows are provided with a wide variety of resources and opportunities, including teaching assignments through HCCC and opportunities for collaboration with other residents. The deadline to apply is March 1.

Indian Arts Research Center Invites Applications for Residency Fellowships
The Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research offers artist-in-residence fellowships annually to advance the work of mature and emerging Native artists. The fellowships support a variety of creative disciplines, including sculpture, performance, basketry, painting, printmaking, digital art, mixed media, photography, pottery, writing, and film and video, and are designed to provide time for artists to explore new avenues of creativity, grapple with new ideas with the potential to further advance their work, and strengthen their existing talents. Each fellowship includes a monthly stipend of $3,000, housing, studio space, a supplies allowance, and travel reimbursement to and from SAR. The Ron and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellowship is dedicated to supporting traditional Native artistry. The residency period runs from June 15 to August 15, 2016. The Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellowship for Native Women encourages the creativity and growth of indigenous women artists working in any media. The residency period runs from March 1 to May 31, 2016. The deadline to apply is January 15.

Summer Residency Fellowships in Giverny, France
The Terra Foundation for American Art is accepting nominations for its Terra Summer Residency program, which brings together doctoral scholars of American art and emerging artists worldwide for a nine-week residency program in Giverny, France. The residency runs from June 6 to August 5. In addition to a $5,000 stipend and a travel contribution of up to $1,500, fellows receive on-site lodging, office/studio space, and lunches for the duration of their residency. Nominees must be either a visual artist with a master’s degree or its equivalent at the time of application (preference is given to those who have completed their degree within the past five years) or a doctoral candidate researching American art and visual culture or its role in a context of international artistic exchange prior to 1980. Nominations must be received by January 15.

Support for Women Artists
The Barbara Deming Memorial Fund gives encouragement and grants to individual feminists in the arts, specifically writers and visual artists, in the United States and Canada. Grants of up $1,500 will be awarded to women poets, fiction and nonfiction writers, visual artists, and mixed-genre (illustration and text) artists whose work in some way focuses on women. Priority will be given to projects that have been initiated or are well under way and for which the artist has substantial work to show. The fund does not support theater, play scripts, videos, or work that is or will be self-published. It also does not provide funds for editing services, business projects, or emergency situations for people in need. The deadline for nonfiction and poetry writers is June 30; a processing fee of $25 is required to submit the online application.

Music Therapy Association Scholarship
The program of the American Music Therapy Association supports the efforts of professional music therapists to expand their training and professional interactions through continuing education. Three cash scholarships of $500 each will be awarded annually. Applications must be received by June 24.

Education Conference Grants
The Spencer Foundation is accepting proposals for a program that supports efforts to bring together scholars whose knowledge, theoretical insight, and methodological expertise can be assembled in ways that build on and reach beyond familiar modes of thinking concerning problems in education research, specifically those related to the area of teaching and learning. Conferences should include a broad set of perspectives on topics or problems in education as they relate to the profession and practice of teaching, or how students learn in formal and informal spaces. The program will support conference proposals with budgets of up to $50,000. Applicants must have earned a doctorate in an academic discipline or professional field, or be able to demonstrate appropriate experience in an education research-related profession. In addition, applicants must be affiliated with a college, university, school district, nonprofit research facility, or nonprofit cultural institution willing to serve as fiscal agent. Applications must be received by January 11.

Macy Foundation Faculty Scholars Program
Macy Faculty Scholars is an annual program of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation that identifies and nurtures the careers of promising educational innovators in medicine and nursing. Scholars implement new educational initiatives at their home institutions and participate in career development activities in return for salary support of up to $100,000 per year for two years, and at least 50% protected time for two years to pursue educational projects. Applicants must have been a doctorally-prepared faculty member for more than five years in a United States accredited nursing school, allopathic medical school, or osteopathic medical school. The deadline to apply is February 17.

Medical Scholars Program
The annual program of the Education and Research Foundation of the Infectious Disease Society of America introduces U.S. and Canadian medical students to the subspecialty of infectious disease. Scholarships of $2,000 support mentored clinical preceptorships, clinical research, epidemiology projects, international health studies, laboratory research, and prevention research. The application system closes February 10.

David E. Rogers Award
Sponsored by the Association of American Medical College and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the $10,000 award honors a medical school faculty member who has made major contributions to improving the health and health care of the American people. The award is limited to an individual who has spent the majority of his or her career in academic medicine in the United States. Nominations must be received by May 6.

Hispanic Children & Families Research Fellowship
The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families, housed at Child Trends, is looking for emerging scholars who are focused on studying issues of relevance to low-income and vulnerable Hispanic children and families. The 12-week, full-time, paid research fellowship program is open to advanced graduate students (those currently in their third year or higher of a Ph.D. program). Fellows can begin work in either the spring or fall at Child Trends’ office in Bethesda, Md. Visit the job posting and FAQs to apply and for more information.

Yale LGBT Studies Research Fellowship
The annual fellowship is designed to provide access to Yale resources in LGBT Studies for scholars who live outside the greater New Haven, Connecticut, region. The program supports scholars from any field interested in pursuing research in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer studies at Yale University using faculty resources, manuscript archives, and library collections at Yale. The fellowship provides an award of $4,000, which is intended to pay for travel to and from New Haven and act as a living allowance. Graduate students conducting dissertation research, independent scholars, and all faculty are invited to apply. Scholars residing within one hundred miles of New Haven are ineligible to apply. Applications are due April 15.

Pilot Psychiatry Research Awards
The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is accepting applications for its 2016 Pilot Research Awards. The annual program provides grants of $15,000 to up to nine general psychiatry residents who have an interest in beginning a career in child and adolescent mental health research. Grant recipients also have the opportunity to submit a poster presentation on their research at AACAP’s 64th annual meeting in Washington, D.C., October 23-28, 2017. The award includes the cost of attending the annual meeting for five days. To be eligible, applicants must either be a current or pending AACAP member and be enrolled in a general psychiatry residency program. Letters of intent must be submitted at the same time as the full application, no later than March 30.

Patient Care Research Projects
The Association for Surgical Education Foundation is accepting applications for patient care research projects that aim to develop and test content methods that yield improvements in patient care in surgery; develop and validate new methods of performance assessment across competency domains required for quality patient care; improve surgical education for medical students; enhance professional development, retention, and reward of surgery faculty and residents who teach and mentor students; and/or test new approaches and resources for improving performance and accountability relevant to the administration of surgical education. Research studies may address teaching techniques, performance evaluation methods, instructional and curriculum design, and educational program design. The maximum amount to be awarded for any CESERT grant proposal is $25,000 (regardless of length of study). To be eligible, applicants must be active member of ASE or a member of another national surgical association. The deadline to apply is June 1.

Bioscience Research Projects
The Whitehall Foundation emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest. Research grants of up to $225,000 over three years will be awarded to established scientists of all ages working at accredited institutions in the United States. One-year Grants-in-Aid grants of up to $30,000 will be awarded to researchers at the assistant professor level who experience difficulty in competing for research funds because they have not yet become firmly established. Grants-in-Aid can also be made to senior scientists. Applicants must hold the position of assistant professor or higher; have principal investigator status; and be considered an “independent investigator” with his/her own dedicated lab space or with lab space independent of another investigator. Letters of Intent must be received no later than January 15.

Teacher-Scholar Awards in Chemical Sciences
The annual program of the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences at undergraduate institutions. The award is based on accomplishment in scholarly research with undergraduates as well as a compelling commitment to teaching, and provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000. The program is open to U.S. academic institutions that grant a bachelor’s or master’s degree in the chemical sciences, including biochemistry, materials chemistry, and chemical engineering. The deadline for nominations is May 18.

Award for Early Career College Faculty
The New England Resource Center for Higher Education is inviting nominations for the 2016 Ernest A. Lynton Award for the Scholarship of Engagement for Early Career Faculty. The annual award recognizes a full-time faculty member who is pre-tenure or has a long-term contract and connects his or her teaching, research, and service to community engagement. Only full-time faculty members from public or private nonprofit college or universities in the U.S. are eligible for the award. Nominations are due April 8.

Research on Generosity/Philanthropy
The new Science and Imagination of Living Generosity program of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is designed to attract and capture bold ideas within the study of life-course generosity and to advance multi-disciplinary methods and approaches within the arts, humanities, and social sciences. There are two funding tracks: Original Social Science Research—The Science of Living Generously (research on generosity over individuals’ lives and generosity’s consequences on well-being and satisfaction), and Imaginative Innovations—The Imagination of Living Generously (original innovations developed within the fields of the arts and/or humanities that focus on creating imaginative works that encourage reflection on generosity for individuals at different stages of the life-course). The School will give innovators the space and resources to stretch their imagination encouraging creative work (e.g., writers, filmmakers, video game designers, musicians, historians, theologians, and philosophers) to illuminate the imagination within the science. Eight grants will be awarded funding for up to $40,000. Complete proposals must be emailed no later than February 12.

Mary Byron Project Celebrating Solutions Awards and Roth Award for Underserved Populations
The Celebrating Solutions Awards of the Mary Byron Project honor innovative programs that demonstrate promise in ending the generational cycle of domestic violence. Up to four programs that can serve as models for the nation are recognized with cash awards of $10,000. The Roth Award was created specifically for programs that address the needs of underserved or vulnerable populations and awards $10,000 to an innovative program. The deadline is January 31.

Red Ribbon Award
Theaward honors and celebrates community-based organizations for their outstanding initiatives that show leadership in reducing the spread and impact of AIDS. The Red Ribbon Award 2016 will be given to community groups for outstanding leadership in responding to AIDS in one or more of the following categories: good health and well-being, reduced inequalities, gender equality, global partnership, and just, peaceful, and inclusive societies. Ten community-based organizations will be selected through a community-led process and invited to attend the XXI International AIDS Conference in South Africa. All ten organizations will receive $10,000 each. The nomination deadline is February 14.

Wilbur Awards
The Religion Communicators Council is an interfaith association of more than four hundred religion communicators working in print and electronic communication, advertising, and public relations. Founded in 1929, the council is the oldest public relations professional association in the United States. The council is accepting entries from secular communicators for its annual Wilbur Award, which recognizes outstanding coverage and representation of faith and religion in the media. The prize is designed to honor excellence by secular media journalists in communicating religious issues as well as positive values and themes. For consideration for the 2016 Wilbur Award, entries must have been produced and published in 2015. Applications must fall into one of the following categories: newspaper articles, magazine articles, books, feature films, digital communications (including blogs and social media campaigns), television and cable, or radio and podcasts. There is a $130 application fee.

Volunteer Times
Volunteer as a family on MLK Day and complete such projects as place mats for seniors, literacy games for preschool students, and homemade dog toys. Read about other opportunities to volunteer in the January edition of Volunteer Times.

SAPCA Newsletter
National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (January 25-29) is a national health observance for teens to promote local events that use science to shatter the myths about drugs. SAPCA and the Above the Influence Club will be sharing facts about alcohol and drug abuse with Alexandria youth during that week. SAPCA will organize students during the school day to submit questions and participate in a live online chat with scientists from the National Institute on Drug Abuse on January 26. For information about hosting an event during Drug Facts week, contact Whitney ChaoLearn more about other upcoming events in the latest newsletter of the Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition of Alexandria (SAPCA).

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on December 22.

Research & Resources

Maury Sets World Record for Cup Stacking
Matthew Maury Elementary School has entered the Guinness Book of World Records by setting a new world record for simultaneous cup stacking. A total of 618,394 individuals simultaneously “sport stacked” at multiple locations on the same day.

“Remember the Titans” Coaches to Be Honored alongside Five Alexandria Athletes in Hall of Fame Ceremony
Coaches Herman Boone and Bill Yoast will be honored alongside Coach Glenn Furman, their assistant coach when the Titans won the State Championship in 1971. Five athletes will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame at the event before the T.C. Williams and W.T Woodson High School basketball game on Friday, February 12. Dee Talbert, a T.C. Williams High School graduate and outstanding athlete who was the first Alexandrian to be killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2004, will also be honored.

Alexandria Schools: Bursting at the Seams
Agenda Alexandria hosted an event that explored such questions how proposals to redistrict and reorganize schools can resolve infrastructure and academic issues, and how modernizations and redistricting options can address aging infrastructure and overcrowding with the least cost and disruption for students and families. The speakers were Alexandria Schools Superintendent Dr. Alvin Crawley, who discussed plans for modernization of the school physical; Abby Raphael of the Arlington School Board sharing her thoughts on the Arlington County School Board experience in redistricting, modernization and accreditation; and former Alexandria School Board Member Arthur E. Peabody, who shared contrasting views about student achievement and the ACPS Strategic Plan. A PDF versionof the presentations is available.

School Board Approves CIP Budget that Conveys Urgency of Capacity Issues
The School Board voted to support a modernization program that seeks to add much-needed and long-awaited capacity to school buildings and bring them in line with modern education specifications.

ACPS Set to Modernize Parker-Gray Stadium
The Parker-Gray Memorial Stadium at T. C. Williams High School will be modernizedand brought in line with other modern sporting facilities in Northern Virginia. Upgrades are to include a new press box, a sound system, lighting, track facilities, new field turf and improvements to both home side and visitor’s side bleachers.

Patrick Henry Community Advisory Group Introduced
The role of the Community Advisory Group is to relay information between civic associations and other community groups, and the Design Review Team and Architectural and Engineering Firm tasked with doing the design work. Members were selected so as to assure a balance of views and opinions as well as a diversity of interest, background and focus among those selected.

A Reminder How to Stay Connected During an Emergency
The ACPS Office of Communications and Public Relations uses a variety of ways to reach families in the event of an emergency.

Education
Education at a Glance 2015: OECD Indicators
The report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development is the authoritative source for accurate information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the output of educational institutions; the impact of learning across countries; the financial and human resources invested in education; access, participation and progression in education; and the learning environment and organization of schools.

Most States Have Cut School Funding, and Some Continue Cutting
According to a survey of budget documents by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, most states provide less support per student for elementary and secondary schools – in some cases, much less – than before the Great Recession. Some states are still cutting eight years after the recession took hold.

Public School Teacher Autonomy in the Classroom Across School Years 2003-04, 2007-08, and 2011-12
In everything from instructional and discipline strategies they use each day to how much homework students receive each night, teachers reported in the federal Schools and Staffing Survey that they feel they had less professional autonomy in 2012 than in 2003. The survey included a nationally representative sample of more than 37,000 American public school elementary and secondary teachers.

America’s Best (and Worst) Cities for School Choice
Using nearly fifty markers of “choice friendliness,” a report by The Thomas B. Fordham Institute shows which of thirty American cities are the best and worst for school choice. The report examines three factors: political support, policy environment, and quantity and quality of schools available for students.

Newark Launching Community Schools with Facebook Money
The Foundation for Newark’s Future, which manages Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s $100 million donation for education in Newark, will invest$1.2 million now and up to $12.5 million total in initiatives that include additional support to students living in poverty in the classroom and in afterschool programs.

Education Department Approves Teacher-Equity Plans for Eight States, Puerto Rico
The U.S. Department of Education approved the last remaining state plans (Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Louisiana, Oregon, South Dakota, and Texas as well as Puerto Rico) to ensure that all students, particularly students from low-income backgrounds, have access to high quality teachers.

Investing in Educator Capacity: An Analysis of State Race to the Top Spending
Areport by the Center for American Progress concluded that while many closely link controversial teacher evaluations to federal Race to the Top grants, less than 10% of the grant funding awarded went into those evaluations while just over half the money spent by states directly helped educators.

Head Start, Child Care See Boosts Under Congressional Budget Deal
Head Start, the federally funded preschool program for children from low-income families, would see an increase of $570 million, to $9.2 billion, in a fiscal 2016 budget bill announced by the House appropriations committee. In addition, the Child Care and Development Block Grant, which helps low-income families pay for child care, would see an additional $326 million for a total of $2.8 billion.

President Signs ESEA Rewrite, Giving States, Districts Bigger Say on Policy
The new iteration of the five-decade old Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is the Every Student Succeeds Act. President Obama noted during its signing that while the authors of the No Child Left Behind Act were well-intentioned, “in practice it often fell short” and led to too much time spend on testing, among other problems.

Will ESSA Trigger Significant Layoffs at the Education Department?
According to the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), within 60 days of ESSA’s passage, the department must publish the number of full-time equivalent employees working on programs or projects that have been eliminated or consolidated since ESSA became law. And within a year of ESSA’s enactment, the U.S. Secretary of Education must reduce the number of full-time equivalent employees associated with those eliminated or consolidated programs or projects. In addition, within that same one-year time frame, the secretary must tell Congress how many full-time employees have been let go as well as the average salary of the full-time equivalent employees who have been let go.

Why the ESEA Bill Seeks a Pardon for Heavyweight Black Boxer Jack Johnson
Buried in the 1,060-page Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is a bid for a posthumous pardon for Jack Johnson, the world heavyweight champion boxer in 1908. His relationships with white women, at a time when so-called miscegenation was illegal in much of the nation and considered by many to be morally abhorrent, proved to be his downfall. He was targeted by the government and ultimately, after several twists and turns, found guilty in 1913 of violating the Mann Act, a federal law focusing on prostitution. Today, Johnson’s conviction under the Mann Act is widely seen as a blatant racial injustice. He died in 1946, just one year before Jackie Robinson played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and broke baseball’s color barrier. It has been reported that the portion of ESSA seeking a pardon for Johnson was requested by Senator McCain and adopted unanimously by his Senate colleagues.

How Woodrow Wilson Denied African-Americans an Academic Education
When he was the president of Princeton, Wilson expressed his pride that no African-American students had been admitted during his tenure. When he was the president of the United States, Wilson brought Jim Crow to the federal government’s appointive offices and its civil service. The Wilson administration backed the effort to deny an academic education to blacks. It published a report proposing to train blacks solely to be more efficient hewers of wood and drawers of water.

Arne Duncan Calls for Addressing Gun Violence in Final Speech as Education Secretary
Arne Duncan used his last speech as U.S. Education Secretary to draw attention to violence that claims the lives of thousands of children each year, saying that the “greatest frustration” of his seven-year tenure has been Washington’s failure to pass gun control legislation. Duncan noted 16,000 young people were killed during his first six years in office and drew connections between street violence and high school dropout rates in America’s poorest communities, saying that both are the result of hopelessness that children feel when they grow up believing that they have a better chance of dying young than going to college or getting a job.

Five Factors Leaders Consider Before Closing Schools to Respond to Threats
EdWeekoutlined factorsschool districts must weigh when deciding if schools should be closed.

NYC Mayor Signs Bill to Pay for Security at Private Schools
The Mayor of New York City signed a billto spend up to $20 million on security guards at private and religious schools.

Safe2Tell
A Colorado-based anonymous school violence tip line credited with stopping numerous attacks is seeking to expand its model to other states. Safe2Tell, a tip line developed after the 1999 shootings at Colorado’s Columbine High School, follows best practices for crime reporting systems: reports are anonymous and quickly handled, and law enforcement and operators are trained in how to quickly cooperate to investigate threats.

News Clip Shows Students Disarming Shooters. Do Schools Teach That?
Fox& Friends on Fox News interviewed a Krav Maga instructor who demonstrated how he teaches his teenage students to disarm school shooters. Some public schools are including training on disarming techniques in their regular shooter drills, which many school safety experts say is unrealistic and unproven.

Three Years After Newtown, Schools Broaden Their Definition of Safety
The Sandy Hook Promise—an organization founded by some of the victims’ families—has added school-based prevention programs to its gun-law efforts. Those programs include “Start With Hello,” a curriculum that “teaches children, teens and young adults how to be more socially inclusive and connected to one another,” and “Say Something,”which the organization describes as “training for children and teens on how to recognize signs, especially in social media, of an individual who may be a threat to them self or others and say something to a trusted adult to get them help.” Organizers credit that program with helping several participating schools intervene in threats.

Family Sues After Police Question 3rd Grader for Hours
A third-grader was taken off a school bus and questioned for hours by police because another girl falsely reported the 8-year-old had chemicals in her backpack.

Town Denies it Detained 3rd Grader Over False Accusation
Tiverton, Rhode Island is accused of detaining a third-grader for several hours after another child told adults she had chemicals in her backpack. In its first response to a lawsuit filed by her family, the town denied the allegations. The lawyer representing Tiverton did not explain in his filing what happened during the October 2014 incident or offer an alternate version of events. According to the lawsuit, the school district made automated calls that evening to all elementary school parents falsely stating that two students claimed to have chemicals and threatened to set a school bus on fire.

Five 5th Grade Students Suspended After Plotting Attack
Five 5th-grade students were suspendedfrom a New Jersey school Wednesday after administrators discovered their written plans for an attack on a high school during a field trip there. The students, ages 10 and 11, had a homemade device filled with vinegar and cinnamon. They were detained by police and later released to their parents.

Mother of Sikh Student Asks Bomb Threat Charges Be Dropped
The mother of a Sikh middle school student accused of threatening to detonate a bomb at his Texas school is asking police to drop the charges. A classmate asked Armaan Singh if a battery in his backpack was a bomb and Singh said it was not. The classmate told the teacher it was. Singh admitted to making the threat while police were questioning him without his parents present and he was arrested.

IrvingTeen Ahmed Mohamed Seeks $15 Million in Damages for Clock Incident
Ahmed Mohamed, the Irving teenager who made national news after he was suspended for bringing a clock to school, is seeking $15 million in damages from the city of Irving and the Irving school district. Mohamed’s attorneys sent letters Monday to the city and the school district, claiming Mohamed’s “reputation in the global community is permanently scarred.”

Positive Mindset May Prime Students’ Brains for Math
In an ongoing series of experiments at Stanford University, neuroscientists have found more efficient brain activity during math thinking in students with a positive mindset about math.

STEM Funding Streams Expanded in NCLB Rewrite
The Every Student Succeeds Act, which could soon replace the 14-year-old No Child Left Behind Law, gives states and districts more opportunities to use federal funds for science, technology, and math education.

Social Media Campaigns Push Students to Consider Becoming Engineers
As part of its #BeAnEngineer campaign, ExxonMobil recently released a series of commercialsthat ask viewers to think about what the world would look like without engineers.

Tell Young Women to Be the Nerd, Not Date the Nerd, Says Facebook CEO
Darlene Hackemer Loretto responded to Zuckerberg’s New Year’s status update saying she keeps telling her granddaughters to “date the nerd in school, he may turn out to be a Mark Zuckerberg!” The co-founder and chief executive officer of Facebook wrote back: “Even better would be to encourage them to *be* the nerd in their school so they can be the next successful inventor!”

Unlocking the Code
Leaders at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and in similar programs around the country, are hoping an introduction to coding will show girls new possibilities for their lives. High-profile groups like Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code have launched after-school and summer programs, while other after-school programs are eager to add technology components to their offerings.

Genealogy Camp Draws Kids Into STEM Experiential Learning, Thanks to Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Middle-school kids could become sleuths into their family history — and get drawn into STEM —in a genealogy summer camp planned by Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. It is a creative approach to bring more kids into science, technology, engineering and math — particularly minority kids and girls, who are underrepresented in those fields. Gates and fellow researchers plan to develop two-week camps at Pennsylvania State University and the University of South Carolina this summer, and additionally at the American Museum of Natural History in 2017. Gates is host of the PBS show “Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr.”.

Arizona District Teaches Coding to K-8 Students
For the second year in a row, every kindergarten through 8th grade student in the Avondale Elementary district outside Phoenix is taking computer-programming classes. Avondale (whose 5,600 students are largely Hispanic and from low-income families) is the only primary-grades district in Arizona requiring the subject, and one of the few in the country with such a comprehensive, in-school coding program for young students.

Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education
Newguidelines that lay out a vision for the future of digital learning recommend teacher colleges revamp their training of educators to use technology, open educational resources be expanded, and improvements in classroom-based assessments.

Digital Rights Group Alleges Google Invades Student Privacy
The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital rights group, depicts Google as a two-faced opportunist in a complaintfiled with the Federal Trade Commission. The complaint alleges that Google rigged the “Chromebook” computers in a way that enables the company to collect information about students’ Internet search requests and online video habits. The foundation says Google is dissecting the activities of students in kindergarten through 12th grade so it can improve its digital services.

California Suspension Rates Continue to Drop as State Changes Policy on Defiance
A report by the Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the University of California, Los Angeles found California schools continued a multi-year trend of suspending fewer students in the 2013-14 school year, largely due to a new state law that restricted the ability of schools to suspend students solely for broad infractions like “defiance”.

Why Some LAUSD Teachers are Balking at a New Approach to Discipline Problems
Many teachers in Los Angeles say their classrooms are reeling from unruly students who are escaping consequences for their actions.

The Impact of Teacher Demographic Representation on Student Attendance and Suspensions
In a discussion paper for the German Institute for the Study of Labor, American University researchers Seth Gershenson and Stephen Holt assessed how racial differences between teachers and students may play out in student behavior. They tracked nearly 990,000 elementary school students from 2006 to 2012, and compared students’ absenteeism and suspension rates to both their own classmates in a given year and changes from year to year. Both suspensions and chronic absenteeism (missing 10% or more of the school year) were rare among students. But boys were more likely than girls, and black and Hispanic students were more likely than white or Asian students to miss school or be suspended. On average, having a teacher of a different race slightly increased the average number of days a student was absent or times he or she was suspended. But the increased risk for minority boys was huge. A black boy was 30% more likely to be suspended when taught by a white woman than when taught by a black woman. Having a teacher of a different race accounted for a third of the racial gap in suspensions, and 1/6thof the racial gap in chronic absenteeism.

Nearly 9 in 10 Music Teacher Candidates Are White, Research Shows
Kenneth Elpus, an assistant professor of music education at the University of Maryland, assessed thediversity of music teacher licensure candidates after investigating the demographics of students who had studied music in high school and participated in college ensembles. The first large-scale study of the demographic profiles of prospective music teachers indicates that the overwhelming majority of music teacher licensure candidates are white.

In Denver, Charters and District Team Up on Special Education
Over the last five years, Denver district officials have been opening special centers for students with significant disabilities inside high-performing charters across the city.

Chicago Teachers Authorize Strike But Any Walkout Months Off
Chicago Teachers Union members overwhelmingly voted to authorize their leaders to call a strike, although a final decision on a walkout would be months away. Negotiations must also move through a lengthy so-called “fact-finding” process where a panel including representatives from the union and Chicago Public Schools make final offers on contested issues. A month after that process, the union could strike.

School Facilities Fuel State-Local Tensions in West Virginia District
After losing half their school system’s K-12 students over a period of decades, residents of Fayette County, West Virginia have long been fighting over which schools to close and which would get new facilities. The state superintendent has proposed a plan that would shutter seven of the district’s 18 schools and move most of its high school students into a new, $56 million facility. An engineer deemed many of the schools too hazardous for use, prompting the state to condemn parts of elementary and middle schools, some of which are still heated by coal. But the state superintendent has faced intense pushback from citizens of the county who say the state is attempting to fracture its tight-knit communities, send students on hours-long bus rides to unfamiliar neighborhoods, and saddle its taxpayers, mostly elderly and on fixed incomes, with a 15-year, $11 million loan they did not ask for.

Austin Board Hires Marketing Firm to Fend Off Charter Competition
The school board in Austin, Texas hired a marketing firm to increase student enrollment after traditional public school enrollment dropped by 3,000 students over the last three years. Charter school enrollment in the area has quadrupled since 2007. The $350,000, one-year contract is just one of a number of the district’s efforts to boost enrollment and improve the perception of its public schools.

Cities Look at Subsidized Housing to Stem Teacher Shortages
Inspired by the success of a 70-unit teachers-only apartment complex in Silicon Valley, school districts in high cost-of-living areas and rural communities that struggle to staff classrooms are considering buying or building rent-subsidized apartments as a way to attract and retain teachers. About $35 million of the $310 million to be raised in San Francisco has been earmarked for construction of up to 100 new apartments on surplus land owned by the San Francisco Unified School District. Officials in the Roaring Fork School District in western Colorado (which serves three mountain towns in the valley that houses Aspen’s posh ski resorts) similarly leveraged a $122 million school construction bond to secure $15 million for subsidized teacher rentals. The district hopes to acquire 15 to 20 apartments in each of the three towns, enough to house at least 10% of its 450 teachers. School districts in Oakland, Milwaukee, Odessa, Texas, and Asheville, North Carolina also have apartment projects for teachers in the works. Los Angeles Unified School District opened its first apartment complex on school grounds for district employees last spring and has two more under construction.

ESEA Rewrite Could Serve as ‘Huge Civil Rights’ Bill for ELLs, Some Advocates Say
The most significant change in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act would shift accountability for English-learner students from Title III (the English-language acquisition section of the ESEA) to Title I (where the accountability of everyone is). The legislation would do more to hold all schools, not just those with significant ELL enrollment, accountable for the education of non-native English-speaking students.

“East of Salinas”
The 53-minute documentaryfeatures a Jose, a 3rd grader who is inspired by his teacher Oscar Ramos, whose parents were migrant farm workers. Ramos had dreams of a college education and a career as a teacher. Because of U.S immigration and naturalization policies that differed from those of today, Ramos was able to attain U.S. citizenship.

For Some Immigrant Students, Culture Bears on College Choice
A father who immigrated from Lebanon to New York City fears if his daughter lives on campus, she will be surrounded by drugs, alcohol, and other bad influences that will clash with her Islamic faith and make her drift from her family and her culture. In his village in Lebanon, girls live at home until they have married. Many teenagers find themselves at odds with their parents when they plan for college. But those who are among the first in their families to attend college are especially prone to choose less-selective schools than they can handle, in part because their families pressure them to stay close to home or because they lack information about their options. That reduces their odds of earning degrees, since more-selective schools tend to have higher completion rates. And it poses a challenge for the counselors whose job it is to ensure that students find the best match for their talents in the world beyond high school.

Giving English Language Learners the Time They Need To Succeed
The National Center on Time and Learning studied how three U.S. schools are using expanded school days to support English-language learners. The reportidentified four best practices: extended literacy blocks, with upwards of 2.5 hours per day focused on skills needed for reading and writing; using data to pinpoint areas where individual students struggle; maintaining support and services for fluent-speaking English-learners who need to boost their academic English skills; and ensuring that teachers meet often to align lesson plans, and identify and address student needs.

How Many Superintendents are Former English-Language Learners?
The school chiefs in two of Minnesota’s largest districts are former English-language learners. While there are other superintendents in the country who also began their education in the U.S. as native speakers of other languages, it is still relatively rare for a one-time ELL to end up at the helm of the district.

Kaplan Test Prep Survey: Majority of Students May Be Taking the SAT® Instead of the ACT® for the Wrong Reasons
survey of parents of college applicants by Kaplan Test Prep released in November shows that 43% say their child plans to take both the SAT and ACT—often to see which test results in the higher score. Deciding which exam to take has added a layer of pressure to what some say is an increasingly stressful college search process.

College Scout Mines Below-the-Radar Schools for Diverse Talent
A recruiter from Gettysburg College, a small, highly selective school in Pennsylvania, is looking for top students from nontraditional backgrounds: those who are the first in their families to attend college or those who come from low-income families. Instead of visiting only exclusive private schools or high-flying public schools, he identifies standout schools that are less likely to be known outside their neighborhoods.

Using Dual Enrollment to Improve the Educational Outcomes of High School Students
report by ACT offers key recommendations and analysis on how to effectively increase student participation and success in dual enrollment programs. It is the first in a series of steps ACT will take as part of its multiyear commitment to boost the number of students taking dual enrollment courses across the nation.

National Graduation Rate Increases to All-Time High of 82%
According to datareleased by the U.S. Department of Education, the graduation rate for the nation’s class of 2014 reached a record 82%, an increase of 1 percentage point from the class of 2013’s graduation rate. Graduation rates for several student demographics rose as well, except for American Indian and Alaskan Native students for whom rates remained virtually flat. Significant gaps remain, particularly between white students and their black and Hispanic counterparts (although those gaps have shrunk recently); economically disadvantaged students also continue to lag behind. The graduation rate for low-income students rose by 1.3 percentage points to 75% from 2013 to 2014, and black students also saw a relatively notable increase of 1.8 percentage points, to roughly 73%.

Sealing the Cracks: Using Graduation Data, Policy, and Practice to Keep All Kids on Track
Areport by the Data Quality Campaign concluded state and national leaders helped raise graduation rates by prioritizing quality, comparable data about which students actually graduated, and which ones fell through the cracks.

DC Public School Students Now Have City Library Cards
Middle-and high-school students in the nation’s capital now have better access to the city’s public libraries. Called the ConnectEd Library Challenge, in April President Barack Obama challenged 30 communities to ensure that all students have access to library cards. A library card was added to the student ID card for about 70,000 middle- and high-school students in the District.

Tennessee’s State-Run District Runs Into Political Trouble
Several Democratic state lawmakers said they will propose billsthis upcoming legislative session to either shut down Tennessee’s state-run Achievement School District (which mostly is based in Memphis) or severely limit its authority to take over schools. Citing a recent Vanderbilt University study, the politicians said district-led turnaround efforts in Chattanooga, Memphis, and Nashville have academically outpaced the state’s and that until the state-run district can begin to show academic progress, it should not be allowed to take over more schools.

Tennessee Free-Tuition Program Moves Focus to College Retention
As the state enters the second year of Tennessee Promise, officials are fine-tuning the program—increasing parent involvement, extending mentoring to college freshmen, and requiring structured advising on campus. Community colleges also are hiring more support staff and trying new strategies to retain students.

Academic Ladder is Extending for More Young Adults
Young adults today are more likely to pursue higher education after high school: 41% vs. 37% in 2008, according to data by KIDS COUNT. The percentage of youth seeking post-secondary education varies greatly by state.


Youth Well-Being
The Raising of America
A new documentaryexplores how conditions faced by children and their families during infancy and the early years can literally alter the developing brain and affect a child’s future success—in school and life. Many families are struggling to provide the nurturing environment all young children need to thrive. How does the growing squeeze on parents—for time, for money and resources—impact the future mental and physical wellbeing of their children? What are the consequences for the nation?

Exposure to Toxic Stress in Childhood Linked to Risky Behavior and Adult Disease
How a mother responds to her baby’s cries can make a big difference in the child’s ability to learn, develop, and thrive. While a warm, supportive response can help the baby calm down and feel secure, a distant or angry reaction leaves the child to fend in a scary world. Over time, the lack of nurturing in the face of adversity in childhood can contribute to “toxic stress” — a harmful level of stress that can affect the child’s well-being well into adulthood. Left unchecked, toxic stress in early childhood strains the stress response system and even alters the developing brain. Over time, without intervention, toxic stress will lead to an increase in adverse health outcomes that would last a lifetime for these children.

PIONEER Study (Caregiver Prioritizing Outcomes, Needs, Expectations and Recovery)
A team of researchers at the University of Maryland have been conducting research for over 15 years with caregivers of children who have a mental health condition. Through this work they have come to understand the needs and concerns of caregivers when faced with the decision to use a psychotropic medication for their child. The current study, called the PIONEER Study(Caregiver PrIoritzing Outcomes, Needs, ExpEctations and Recovery), is being conducted in collaboration with family caregivers, who have helped to inform the research questions and to identify the key concerns in managing the care of a child with mental health needs. The research gives families a voice in expressing what matters most to them when it comes to weighing the benefits and risks of the different demands in the care management of their child and when it comes to prioritizing the outcomes that are most important to them and their child.

The Arts in Early Childhood: Social and Emotional Benefits of Arts Participation
Areview of research on arts and early childhood from the National Endowment for the Arts concluded arts programs help children develop social and emotional skills in early childhood. Reviewers also found two studies that indicated autistic children benefit from music and music therapy sessions.

The Earlier the Better: Developmental Screening for Connecticut’s Young Children
The focus of the report is screening and surveillance in early childhood settings. It provides a comprehensive review of the views and experiences of child care providers in Connecticut and the families they serve.

Resources for Assessing Kindergartners
The process of formative assessment provides meaningful information about individual children’s assets and needs at a given point to help teachers individualize instructional strategies. The K-3 Formative Assessment Consortium is a group of ten states in various stages of implementing formative assessment in kindergarten through 3rdgrade. Their newsletter (September and November) is produced by Child Trends.

Dyslexia Signs Can Show Up Before Early Reading
Astudypublished in the Journal of Pediatricsfoundchildren with dyslexia show gaps in both verbal ability and intelligence compared to typically developing children by 1st grade, and the gaps persist into 12th grade.

Parent-Driven Group Wields Influence on Dyslexia Concerns
Aninformal connection among parents has evolved into an influential movement, Decoding Dyslexia.

Opportunity, Responsibility, and Security: A Consensus Plan for Reducing Poverty and Restoring the American Dream
A politically diverse group of experts on poverty have created a detailed planfor reducing poverty and increasing economic mobility.

Single Parents Raising More than a Third of U.S. Kids
According to new data from KIDS COUNT, 25 million youth (35% of the country’s children) live in single-parent households.

Young Children with Active-Duty Parents
More than 700,000 U.S. children under age six have or had an active-duty parent, and some have had two. Young children may be especially affectedby a parent’s deployment because of their emotional dependence on adults and susceptibility to high levels of stress.

Unaccompanied Children Crossing Southern Border in Greater Numbers Again, Raising Fears of New Migrant Crisis
According to U.S. government dataanalyzed by the Migration Policy Institute, more than 10,500 children crossed the U.S.-Mexico border by themselves, the vast majority from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras – an increase of 106% over the same period last year.

Low-Income Latino Families Are More Financially Stable and Less Likely to Participate in Government Assistance Programs
Threebriefs from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families profile economic circumstances in low-income Latino households. Hispanic children are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanics to live in households with income of less than $24,000 annually. Their households have less variation (positive or negative) in their month-to-month households, but they may face difficulties accessing public assistance programs.

How Much Do Toddlers Know About Logic?
Alison Gopnik, a scientist, philosopher and author, discoveredeven very, very young children already have a lot of the same learning abilities that the smartest scientists have.

Can 2-Year-Olds Understand What Other People Want?
According to Alison Gopnik, there is no need to make babies and young children learn. All that is needed is to let them learn.

Infants and Toddlers in the District of Columbia: A Statistical Look at Needs and Disparities
report by Child Trends found infants and toddlers in certain wards in the District of Columbia are more than 100 times more likely to face neglect or other maltreatment and 25 more times likely to die before their first birthday than their peers in more affluent parts of the city.

Use of Child Care Subsidies in Maryland
Maryland’s Child Care Subsidy program helps eligible parents pay for child care while they are working or participating in activities such as education or training. In Maryland, caseworkers may provide families with 12 months of subsidy eligibility before recertifying, but eligibility lengths vary by county. Child Trends found that families’ periods of eligibility (and the length of time their child care vouchers are good for) are often short: in 2012, half of all vouchers were for 13 weeks or fewer. Short eligibility periods may lead to unstable care arrangements, which link to poor developmental outcomes for children. Also tracked was the length of time families participated in subsidized care, and how often they left and returned.

Cleveland Preschool Quality-Improvement Effort Reports Early Gains
Cleveland has released the first report on its new quality improvement program. Unlike some city programs, Pre4Cle works directly with existing preschools and it is not focused on free tuition for every child. The organization’s staff raised money to increase enrollment through tuition assistance for families and business-side investments for partners. Children in the program were assessed by outside consultants using the Bracken School Readiness exam in the fall and spring: 31% of children made meaningful improvement in three areas of the exam over the course of the school year, and 57% showed such progress in two categories; 80% tested in the “average,” “advanced,” or “very advanced,” categories, indicating that they are ready to start kindergarten.

Many Turned Away from State’s Preschool Program
The majority of families who applied for Indiana’s new preschool pilot program for disadvantaged students were turned away. The program, which was signed into law in 2014 by Governor Mike Pence, set aside $10 million a year to send as many as 2,500 children from low-income families to preschool in five counties. But demand has outstripped the amount of money lawmakers made available for the program. As a result, only about 43% of those who applied were accepted.

Website Spotlights Programs Using Technology to Support Early Literacy
A new website, Integrating Technology in Early Literacy, is a joint project of the Washington-based think tank New America and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at the Sesame Workshop

Toddlers Gain Touch-Screen Skills Early, Study Finds
According to a study in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, toddlers are becoming adept at using touchscreen technology associated with smartphones and tablets in ways that could help educators assess early skills.

Is a Digital Device in Your Child’s Future This Holiday Season?
It is estimated 75% of children under age eight have access to devices classified as ”smart” and 78% of teens possess their own cell phones. Many children and teens, however, are not developmentally ready or responsible enough to have the world at their fingertips via Wi-Fi and social media.

Artistic Collaboration: Transforming Youth and Youth Justice by Integrating Arts
The Arts for Incarcerated Youth Network is a collaborativein Los Angeles County that is reframing the arts as a foundation for building wellness, health and resiliency in young people.

Ferguson Puts Chess in Schools to Help Students
The superintendent of the Ferguson, Missouri school district is optimistic that a new afterschool program in the district’s 20 elementary and middle schools can turn things around.

Cultivating Young Chess Masters in Some of St. Louis’Poorest Schools
A partnership between the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis and Ascension, a healthcare company, brought chess to 17 elementary and three middle schools in Ferguson-Florissant.

How Afterschool Programs Can Impact Kids’ Screen Time
According to a survey by Common Sense Media, teenagers spend more than 6.5 hours per day in front of electronic screens. Their total use, including reading print publications for pleasure and listening to music, is about 9 hours. Research published in Pediatrics found that children age 2 spend as much time on mobile devices as on television, and most children have their own device by age 4.

Ready for Work? How Afterschool Programs Can Support Employability Through Social and Emotional Learning
Young people need a variety of important skills to be ready to work, including understanding key work habits and having a strong work ethic. But another aspect of employability has gained attention in recent years—the need for strong social and emotional skills in order to be successful in the workplace. A new resource is designed to help afterschool program staff foster employability skill building in their program.

Muslim Youth Treated as Outsiders, Face Hostility: Youth Programs Respond
A 2014 survey by the Council on Islamic-American Relations in California found more than half of Muslim students ages 11 to 18 reported being bullied because of their religion. The Brain Coyle Center in Minneapolis provides young people, most of whom are Muslim, with a safe youth-friendly space.

‘Teenager’s Handbook’ Advises: Reach Across the Divide, Get Informed about Islam
An instructor at Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, Florida co-authored a book with her two children, The American Muslim Teenager’s Handbook. The book was written “for other Muslim-American teens who we thought might be having a tough time after 9/11”.

Make Schools Welcoming for Muslims, Refugee Students, Ed. Dept. Urges
Guidance issued to educators by the U.S. Department of Education advised that schools and higher education institutions should take extra steps to ensure that “students are “free from discrimination and harassment based on their race, religion, or national origin”.

It’s Time to Talk: How to Start Conversations about Racial Inequities
Race is a clear difference-maker in the well-being of youth. A report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation profiles how KIDS COUNTS state partners in Nebraska, Wisconsin and Washington used thoughtful, data-driven community dialogue to move the needle toward equity and inspire leaders to convene conversation on race in their own jurisdictions.

The Path Forward: Improving Opportunities for African American Students
Areport and interactive site produced by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation offers a portrait of the performance of African-American students in the United States today. How successful have interventions to improve the quality of education been? In what areas are African-American students succeeding? In what areas are they struggling?

Accelerating Pathways
A new research initiativeAccelerating Pathways, is comprised of a Youth Economic Strategy Index, an interactive database tool, and a 2015 Global Youth Survey. The report examines how 35 cities are supporting young people’s economic goals. Commissioned by the Citi Foundation and conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the survey included 5,350 respondents age 18 to 25.

Revisiting Youth Apprenticeships
According to a report by the Century Foundation, the average earning gain associated with a completed apprenticeship was over $14,000 in the sixth year and over $240,000 over the course of a participants’ entire career.

Keeping Young Adults Connected and Supported
A growing body of research on brain development has shown that the boundary between adolescence and adulthood is not a fixed point, but can extend well into an individual’s twenties. And 18 to 24-year-olds—also referred to as young adults — stand out as a distinct developmental group with heightened impulsive behavior, risk taking, and poor decision-making. In light of this emerging research, some states have adjusted policies and practices to be more responsive to young adults’ needs.

Bill Would Give Former Foster Youth Early Access to Tax Credit
The Foster EITC Act (S 2327) would allow certain former foster youth to access the Earned Income Tax Credit at age 18, rather than waiting until age 25. The federal tax credit is for working individuals and families with low and moderate incomes, and is widely seen as a way to encourage work and reduce poverty. The bill’s supporters said young adults often have financial support from their families after they turn 18, but foster care youth usually do not. The tax credit is one way to bridge the gapas foster youth learn how to live on their own.

Helping First-Generation College Students Succeed
A three-part blog series by the American Youth Policy Forum draws on first-generation college student experiences and outlines helpful best practices and innovative strategies to help them thrive and succeed. The topics are the role of traditional counseling, how peers can help, and how technologycan complement traditional/peer college counseling.

A Snapshot of Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Programs for Youth
Healthy marriage and relationship education programs can help youth develop the skills they need to form healthy relationships and avoid bad ones. A fact sheet describes these programs serving youth, characteristics of those served, and the most commonly used curricula, program goals, and expected outcomes.

Mindfulness: Helping Youth Learn to Feel Emotions and Choose Their Behavior
Neuroscience has revealed in recent years that trauma resulting from adverse childhood events can actually change the brain — for the worse — of a developing child. And their thought processes and behaviors can become impaired as a result. They may be less able to control their emotions than youth who have not been traumatized, and they may experience re-injury and disturbing flashbacks. A growing number of experts, including psychologists, social workers and physicians, have found a new tool in their kits for treating young people: mindfulness.

Database Helps Youth Workers Find Activities for Support Groups
UK Youth, a London-based organization that provides young people with innovative learning opportunities, had compiled an online database of activities for support groups organized by topic area. Each activity listing, which can be downloaded for free, includes a simple set of directions, the list of materials needed to complete the exercise, required handouts, and relevant discussion questions.

Payoffs for California College Students and Taxpayers from Investing in Student Mental Health
Areport by the Rand Corporation predicts the increase in California college students receiving mental health treatment will lead to significant tax savings for the state due to increased graduation rates.

If Tennessee Expanded Medicaid, Mental Health Department Could Save $40M
The state agency that oversees mental health is asking for a multi-million dollar budget increase, in part because the legislature turned down Insure Tennessee.

Investing to Improve the Well-Being of Vulnerable Youth and Young Adults
A publication by the Youth Transition Funders Group provides a framework for understanding the well-being of vulnerable youth and highlights the roles families, communities, and public systems can take to promote young people’s well-being. It offers recommendations for youth system leaders, policymakers, and stakeholders to improve policy and practice to support a successful transition to adulthood for vulnerable youth.

California High School Health Clinic Asks Students about Childhood Trauma to Improve Their Health
Research has shown a direct link between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the adult onset of chronic disease, mental illness, violence and being a victim of violence. ACEs create mental and physical health risks that continue to crop up over a person’s lifetime if not adequately addressed. At the Elsie Allen Health Center in Santa Rosa, California, one of the first things students do when they arrive for an appointment is answer questionsabout the trauma they have experienced during their lives.

Teach Mental Health in Primary Schools, Advisory Group Says
An advisory group in the United Kingdom recommended that mental health be placed on the national curriculum for primary school children.

Great Starts with Breakfast Survey Report
In December 2014, the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth and Y Street collected 1,505 surveys in 45 localities and schools across Virginia to learn more about what students thinkabout school breakfast.

Mayo Clinic Finds Link Between Youth Contact Sports and Brain Disease
Astudypublished in the journal Acta Neuropathologica found youth-athletes who participate in contact sports may be at increased risk of developing the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) later in life. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus analyzed the medical records of 1,721 deceased men. Of the 66 who participated in contact sports as youth, 21 had “pathology consistent with CTE” to some degree.

Parents for Healthy Schools Website
CDC in collaboration with federal, professional, and non-profit organizations has developed a set of resources that assists school groups such as parent-teacher associations and school wellness committees engaging parents in the creation of healthy school environments.

Portal de Informacion de Salud de NIH
This new Spanish-language health information websiteoffers free health information on topics ranging from child health to aging. The new site also features a monthly column, designed as an opportunity for readers to learn about Spanish-language resources available from the NIH.

Resources to Put Youth and Doctors More At-Ease Talking About Sexual Health
Talking about sexual and reproductive health can be awkward for young people. For teens who have been abused, or simply have not talked to a doctor about sex or relationships, those conversations can be especially uncomfortable. The National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth has made available resources that can be shared with young people or with local clinics and doctors’ offices.

The Role of Research in Promoting Social Change: Teen Pregnancy Prevention as a Case Study
Awebcast of a lecture by the former CEO of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy discusses how data can be used to shape public and policymaker opinion; the importance of understanding the social context of an intervention; the value of accurate information to a social campaign, and why research, communications, and cultural understanding in tackling social ills should be combined.

Sex Education Programs Fall Short of CDC Recommendations in Many States
More than half of high schools in 44 states surveyed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention teach all 16 topicsrecommended by the agency as “essential components of sexual health education”. Only about a fifth of middle schools in those states teach all 16 topics.

Reducing Teen Substance Misuse: What Really Works
According to a report by Trust for America’s Health, 24 states scored five or lower out of 10 on key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the well-being of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing substance misuse. Four states tied for the lowest score of 3 out of a possible 10 (Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi and Wyoming) while two states achieved 10 out of 10 (Minnesota and New Jersey). The report includes an analysis of the most recent drug overdose death rates among 12- to 25-year-olds, finding that current rates were highest in West Virginia (12.6 per 100,000 youth) –which were more than five times higher than the lowest rates in North Dakota (2.2 per 100,000). Males are 2.5 times as likely to overdose as females (10.4 vs. 4.1 per 100,000). In 1999-2001, no state had a youth drug overdose death rate above 6.1 per 100,000. By 2011-13, 33 states were above 6.1 per 100,000. In the past 12 year,: rates have more than doubled in 18 states (Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina and Tennessee); rates have more than tripled in twelve states (Arkansas, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Oklahoma, Utah and West Virginia); and rates have more than quadrupled in five states (Kansas, Montana, Ohio, Wisconsin and Wyoming).

Smoking Most Prevalent Mode of Lifetime Marijuana Use Among Adults; 30% Report Consuming in Edibles and 10% Report Vaporizing
According to data from a nationally representative consumer panel survey, 35% of adults reported ever using marijuana in 2014. Among those adults, smoking was reported as the most prevalent mode of marijuana use.

E-Cigarette Advertising Reaches 70 Percent of Middle and High Schoolers, CDC Says
CDC’s findingswere drawn from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, which included a representative sample of more than 22,000 middle and high school students. Nearly 70% — an estimated 18.3 million students — reported having seen e-cigarette marketing in at least one setting that year. They were most likely to see e-cig ads in retail stores, followed by the internet, television, movies, newspapers and magazines. Young people reported seeing more ads for conventional cigarettes and other tobacco products in retails stores than for e-cigarettes, but the level of exposure in other venues was comparable.

Unspoken Truths: Young People in Recovery
Youth Today has made available a video produced last summer when the Alcoholic Anonymous convention was in Atlanta that features young people sharing honest and bold voices about addiction and recovery

Head of LA’s New Office of Child Protection Sees Big Challenge With No Specific Authority
California’s massive foster care system is the largest in the nation, with 62,097 in foster care as of 2014. New York, which has the next largest system, has 25,397. The position of Director of Los Angeles County’s new Office of Child Protection was created by the LA County Board of Supervisors at the recommendation of a blue-ribbon commission empaneled by the supervisors in the wake of the horrific killing of 8-year-old Gabriel Fernandez. The boy had been seen multiple times by foster care workers and county sheriff’s deputies before he was essentially tortured to death by his mother and her boyfriend. After its formation, the commission declared the county’s foster care system to be in a state of emergency requiring a fundamental transformation of the current child protection system.

Social Service Programs that Foster Multiple Positive Outcomes
Abrief by Child Trends highlights 14 programs for children and families that research has shown to positively impact more than one outcome.

What Makes Youth in Foster Care More Likely to Run Away?
Youth who have been in foster care are overrepresented among homeless youth. Data from more than 110.000 cases of youth ages 12 to 17 collected in the national Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System was analyzed to identify factors that increase the risk of youth in foster care running away from their current placement. Study authors recommended that child welfare agencies adopt steps to help youth trust personnel and not feel judged by caretakers. Further research was advised to explore the impact of other factors like concentration of poverty of local agencies’ policies and practices.

Finding Creative Ways to Engage Homeless Youth
The Orion Center in Seattle is a drop-in center where homeless youth get food, clothing, supplies, and referrals to other services. What gets many youth to stay and open up are the uniqueactivities, classes and workshops Orion offers.

Youth Homelessness Has Dropped, Feds Report (But It’s Complicated)
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development estimates that there were 127,787 homeless children in the United States in 2015, a 5.8% drop from 2014. But other agencies and youth advocates dispute that figure. In HUD’s 2015 point-in-time homeless count, 23% of all homeless people were childrenunder the age of 18, including 4,667 unaccompanied youths under 18. But HUD called efforts to measure youth homelessness “a work in progress because communities are still learning how to collect this data accurately.

6 Questions to Identify Youth at Highest Risk of Long-Term Homelessness
Developed by Eric Rice, associate professor at the University of Southern California School of Social Work, a tool uses a welcoming, conversational tone to assess for six experiences that Rice and his colleagues have found are strongly linked to long-term homelessness: ever having run away from home, a foster home, or group home; witnessing or experiencing violence at home; serious conflict with caregivers over religion or other beliefs; trying marijuana before age 12; serving time in jail before age 18, and becoming pregnant or having gotten someone else pregnant.

Family Finding Helps Homeless Young People Connect to Caring Adults
Family finding gives agencies a structured approach to help youth identify and forge permanent relationships with relatives, family friends, and other trusted adults. The model can also be adjusted to support unaccompanied homeless youth in need of their own lifelong connections.

Does the Home Free Program Affect Family Dynamics, Communication?
Researchers wanted to explore the ongoing influence of the Home Free Program, a service offered by the National Runaway Safeline and Greyhound Lines to reunite runaway youth with their families. They conducted telephone interviews with 107 parents and guardians whose children (ages 14–20) had run away from home and used the program’s services in 2011. Participants reported significant increases in family expressiveness and decreases in family conflict after the intervention. Indeed, more than 60% of participants said they felt the issues that led to their child running away had been mostly or completely resolved by one month after their return. Nearly 75% said they felt that way by the time of the interview.

HHS Could Do More to Support States’ Efforts to Keep Children in Family-Based Care
The Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently released areport tracking the use of congregate care in eight states. While the featured states have reduced their reliance on group homes and institutions, more can be done, said the agency. Quoting the report: “It is important that HHS continues to progress in its understanding of the national landscape of congregate care so that it can be better positioned to support states through their transitions. Significant changes in child welfare programs require thoughtful leadership, relevant information, and sustained attention.”

Juvenile Justice
Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit
The Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit is a resource for building relationships and trust between police officers and young people through facilitated conversations. The Center for Court Innovation and the US Department of Justice COPS Office developed the toolkit for communities hoping to foster conversations between young people and the police, enabling them to discuss their interactions and find common ground.

The Amber Advocate
Included in the latest issue of the OJJDP newsletteris an article on best practices for law enforcement to help families of homicide victims.

In Many States, Prospects are Grim for Incarcerated Youths
A survey of juvenile corrections agencies by the Council of State Governments Justice Center revealed that even as the number of incarcerated juveniles dropped significantly over the past decade, only 13 states provide students who are behind bars with the same types of educational and vocational services, including GED preparation, credit recovery, and postsecondary courses, that students in schools receive. A report by the council found that many states do not hold schools inside juvenile correctional facilities—which can be run by the states, private companies, or nonprofit organizations—accountable for providing students with curricula aligned with a state’s college- and career-readiness standards. And many do not have rigorous oversight of educational programs at those facilities as they do for regular public schools.

Zero Tolerance: How States Comply with PREA’s Youthful Inmate Standard
The United States’extraordinary use of adult correctional facilities to house youth presents numerous concerns, including serious, long-term costs to the youth offender and to society at large. In light of the decline of youth arrests and youth crime coupled with the requirements of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), the housing status of the 1200 youth under 18 years of age in the adult prison should be investigated. Each state has its own unique prison system. In order to determine the housing status of youth, the Campaign for Youth Justice gathered information on each state’s statutes, policies, and practices for housing the shrinking — and at times — invisible, population of youth in adult prisons across the country.

Justice Department Issues Guidance on Identifying and Preventing Gender Bias in Law Enforcement Response to Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence
The U.S. Attorney General announced new guidance to help law enforcement agencies identify and prevent gender bias in their response to sexual assault and domestic violence. The guidance offers eight principles for law enforcement to incorporate into policies and training to ensure that neither implicit nor explicit gender bias will undermine efforts to keep victims safe and hold assailants accountable. The principles include recognizing and addressing biases and stereotypes regarding victims, treating all victims with respect, and encouraging victims to participate in the investigation.

Workshops & Webinars

Cultural Neuroscience: Closing the Gap in Population Mental Health Disparities (January 8, 2 – 3 p.m.)
Cultural neuroscience is a research field that examines the cultural, environmental, and genetic factors that shape psychological and neural processes underlying behavior. Recent advances in cultural neuroscience demonstrate the relevance of culture in modulating brain and behavior. A NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research talkwill provide an overview of advances in cultural neuroscience, with discussion of the implications of this research for closing the gap in population mental health disparities.

Utilizing a Flipped Classroom to Train Teen Teachers (January 13, 12:30 – 2 p.m.)
The webinarwill explore a pilot model being used to accommodate the need for more flexibility and versatility for training teen teachers. A flipped classroom approach allows youth to watch self-study modules (using their phone, tablet, or computer) prior to attending in-person training.

An Overview of Current Research and Implementation Best Practices in Wraparound (January 19, 2 -3 p.m.)
Thewebinarwill set the context for the importance of Wraparound quality, fidelity, and implementation supports. A review of the latest innovations, data, and research will be presented on such areas as cost, outcomes, workforce supports, and evidence-based clinical practices.

Parental Arrest Policies and Protecting Children: Training Your Department (January 20, 4-5 p.m.)
Thewebinarsponsored by the International Association of Chiefs of Police in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance will provide training guidance and resources to help police departments develop and implement parental arrest policies to safeguard children.

Increasing College & Career Readiness through Afterschool & Competency-Based Learning (On Demand)
The American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) has been exploring the opportunities that exist at the intersection of afterschool and competency-based learning. Presenters featured in the webinar shared promising practices in the realms of badging, internships, work-based learning experiences, and other emerging strategies that bridge afterschool and competency-based learning as well as discussed opprotunities moving forward in policy and practice.

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