Dispatched

Youth Topics in Alexandria 2.19.16 Edition | Newsletter | Center for Children and Families

City of Alexandria, VA City of Alexandria, VA

Community & Human Services

Youth Topics eNewsletter

Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families of the Department of Community and Human Services.

It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services.

Subscribe or make an inquiry

In the February 19 Edition:

Events
Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month 2016 Calendar (February)
Tap, Click, Read: A Conversation with Lisa Guernsey (February 23)
Titan Takeover Teen Night (March 11)
Allies in Prevention Awards Luncheon (April 5)
Dual Status Youth Symposium: Working Together for Our Children (April 5-6)
Probation System Reform Symposium (April 7 – 8)
Samuel Halperin Lecture and Youth Public Service Award (April 15)
National Reduce Tobacco Use Conference (April 24 – 26)

Careers/Volunteerism
Young Scholars Program
Computer, Video, Game Scholarships for Women
Alexandria Workforce Development Center Career Readiness Workshops
STEM Challenge
National Weather Association Essay Contest
Student Submissions for Photography and Multimedia Competition
Cooney Center Fellowships
Youth in Custody Certificate Program
KIND People
Lizette Patterson-Homer Injury Prevention Award
National Philanthropy Day Honors
College Board Award for Excellence in the Arts
Princess Grace Foundation-USA Theater Awards
Guggenheim Fellowships
Korean Arts Foundation of America Award for Visual Arts
Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Fellowships
Dominican Studies Fellowship
Senior Scientist Mentor Program in the Chemical Sciences
Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities

Research & Resources
Summer of Smiles
Summer School and Enrichment Programs Announced
Alexandria City Public Schools Named as Seventh Best School Division
School Board Adjusts Redistricting Process But Holds Firm on Implementation Date
Kids Need Connections
Being Social Media Safe: A Parents-Only Seminar
How to Use Social Media to Impress Colleges and Future Employers
School Board Approves Architect for Patrick Henry Project

Education 
First School in Virginia to Desegregate Marks Anniversary of Integration
Desegregation Since the Coleman Report
Are U.S. Schools Really Resegregating?
In An Age of Resegregation, These Schools Are Trying to Balance Poor and Wealthy Kids
Obama Budget to Seek New Money to Help Schools Integrate, Sources Say
Parents Outraged After Students Shown “White Guilt” Cartoon for Black History Month
Black History Month 2016: It’s Time to Treat Racism as a Target for Intervention
What It Was Like to Walk in the Shoes of America’s Slaves
Compared to their Classmates, Kids of Color More Likely to Be Removed By Schools
For Preservice Teachers, Lessons on Cultural Sensitivity
In Schools, Teacher Quality Matters Most

2016 Building a Grad Nation Data Brief: Overview of 2013-14 High School Graduation Rates
Education in America: The Low-Income Gap (Video)
State Laws That Can Lead to School Arrests Targeted for Change
GOP-Led States Increasingly Taking Control From Local School Boards
The Constitutional Change That Could Make Virginia More Welcoming to Charter Schools
Charter School Amendment Dies in Virginia Senate
Va.’s Governor Wants to Remake High School Education
Christensen Institute Offers Database to Compare School Blended Learning Models
Obama to Officially Nominate John B. King Jr. as Education Secretary

Reversing a Raw Deal
ACLU, Tenth Amendment Center Join Forces on Data Privacy
Google Acknowledges Data Mining Student Users Outside Apps for Education
With Computer Science Ed. Gaining Momentum, Girls Still Well Behind
STEM Teacher Tool: Free Videos on ‘Super Small Science”
Fitbits Now Mandatory for Students at This Oklahoma University
Is More Physical Education at School Linked to Higher Student Math Scores?
Getting a Read on the App Stores: A Market Scan and Analysis of Children’s Literacy Apps
Luminosity, Other Brain-Training Products Get Federal Scrutiny
Can Brain Games Keep Aging Minds Young? There’s An App for That, Says Scientists
Universal Autism Screening Lacks Evidence of Benefit, Medical Panel Finds

Could $1 Billion Make Teaching the Best Job in the World?
National Network Seeks to Get More H.S. Students Interested in Teaching
Colleges Seek Out Future Special Ed. Teachers
New Web Tool Spotlights Mismatches Between Education and Labor Market
Nation’s Prominent Public Universities Are Shifting to Out-of-State Students
For a Slot at a 4-Year University, Some North Carolina Students Could Soon Need a Community College Degree
Amid National Backlash, Mount St. Mary’s President Defends His Tenure in Letter to Parents
Vindictive Principals Destroy Morale

At Success Academy School, a Stumble in Math and a Teacher’s Anger on Video
D.C. Public Schools, Closely Watched for Its Reform Efforts, Is Overhauling Teacher Evaluation and Training
Flint’s Former Manager Resigns as Head of Detroit Schools
Flint Educator: Our Water Crisis is a Crisis of Trust
Flint Superintendent Asks Congress for Aid, Understanding
Repair Bill for Decaying Detroit Schools Could Top $50 Million
Crumbling, Mold-Infested Detroit School Gets Celebrity Attention, $500K Donation
Harford Count Suspends School Trips to Baltimore
All Pennsylvania Schools Will Carry Opioid Overdose Drug
Financial Crisis in Chicago’s Schools Deepens Discord
Maine Governor Paul LePage Blocks Rules Protecting Trans Students
LePage Withdraws Nominee Amid Spat Over Transgender Rules
Schools Across Mississippi Receive Bomb Threats
L.A. Unified Bars Federal Immigration Agents From Its Campuses

Youth Well-Being
Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development Biennial Conference
President Obama Proposes New ‘First Job’ Funding to Connect Young Americans with Jobs and Skills Training to Start Their Careers
Leading After-school Group Disappointed by Obama Budget
Opportunity for All? Technology and Learning in Lower-Income Families
Connecting to Learn: Promoting Digital Equity for America’s Hispanic Families
Study Explores How Black Men Find Success in College

Arne Duncan, Anna Spangler Nelson and Paul Tagliabue to Join Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics
Barry Sanders: Should You Let Your Kids Play Football?
Florida Students Create App to Prevent Football Concussions
Probe: Plano East Athletes Subjected to Racist Comments, ‘Fight Club’

‘Chasing the Dragon” FBI Film Aims to Reach Kids Before Drug Addiction Does
How to Talk to Kids About Drugs – And How Not To
If They Had Asked: Young People in Recovery Reflect on What Could Have Been
White House Seeks Nearly $1.2 Billion for Drug Prevention, Treatment, Overdose Response
Q&A: How Homeless Youth Programs Can Benefit from Drug-Free Communities Funding

A Snapshot of Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Programs for Youth
How Do African American Boys and Young Men View Healthy Dating Relationships?
4 Ways to Prevent Violence by Promoting Healthy Relationships During Childhood
Meeting the Needs of Kids in the U.S. Who Fled Violence in Central America
What Makes Youth More Likely to Be Involved in Both Peer and Dating Violence?
Male Classmate Provided Gun Used in Arizona Murder-Suicide
4 Tips for Leveraging Communities of Faith to Support Victims of Domestic Violence
Q&A: Aaron Steed of Meathead Movers on Offering Free Moving Services to Victims of Domestic Violence

Faces of Human Trafficking
In New Orleans, An Anti-Trafficking Task Force Introduces Best Practices and Partnerships
5 Ways Safe Harbor Laws Support Young Victims of Commercial Sexual Exploitation
The 12 Core Concepts for Understanding Traumatic Stress Responses in Children and Families – Adapted for Youth Who Are Trafficked
What’s Sharing Power Got to Do with Trauma-Informed Practice?
Comprehensive Human Trafficking Assessment Tool
Can an Adapted Group Therapy Model Help Female Victims of Commercial Sexual Exploitation?

National Initiative Uses Lunch to Combat Growing Public Health Threat
Family Meals
How Not To Raise a Workaholic
Parenting Skills Boosted by Video Feedback, Study Finds
How Not To Raise a Workaholic
The Importance of High School Mentors
Senior Citizens as Mentors
Youth Voting
SCAN Legislative Agenda

Juvenile Justice
Why Are LA’s Foster Kids More Likely to Be Charged with Crimes?
ABA Task Force Wants to Help Disrupt School-to-Prison Pipeline
Report: MS-13 Foot Soldiers Use ‘Surge’ to Cross Border, ‘Colonize New Criminal Territory’
Youth Confinement in America Today
President Obama Bans Solitary Confinement for Juveniles in Federal Prisons
Locked In: Interactions with the Criminal Justice and Child Welfare Systems for LGBTQ Youth, YMSM, and YWSW Who Engage in Survival Sex
Services for LGBTQ Youth Having Survival Sex Are Inadequate: New Report
Sexual Victimization Reported by Juvenile Correctional Authorities, 2007-12
Survey of Sexual Violence in Juvenile Correctional Facilities, 2007-12 Statistical Tables

Workshops & Webinars 
How Research Evidence Informs Foster Youth Medication Policies (February 22)
Teen Dating Violence (February 23)
National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS) Monthly Webinar (February 24)
The National Landscape: Public Health Strategies for Effectively Preventing Violence (March 2)
Human Trafficking, Domestic Violence, and Sexual Assault: Strategies to Strengthen Community Collaboration to Respond to Survivors’ Needs (On Demand Webinar Series)
Capacity Building Webinars for Human Trafficking Service Providers (On Demand Webinar Series)
Understanding the Complex Needs of Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (On Demand Webinar Series)
Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series (On Demand)
Career Pathways: From Ideas to Action, Tools for States (On Demand)

Events

Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month 2016 Calendar (February
Partners and grantees of the Family & Youth Services Bureau are sponsoring public awareness campaigns, webinars, social media events, and radio shows that highlight healthy relationships.

Tap, Click, Read: A Conversation with Lisa Guernsey (February 23)
Lisa Guernsey, expert on young children and technology, will talk with Pat Welsh about navigating the complicated world of screens and learning to read in a digital age. Lisa will take questions and share stories from Tap, Click, Read, her recent book written with Michael H. Levine. The event from 7–8:30 pm at Busboys and Poets in Shirlington (4251 Campbell Avenue) will be followed by a book signing; book sale proceeds go to early childhood research.

Titan Takeover Teen Night (March 11)
The Alexandria Campaign on Adolescent Pregnancy’s KeepIt360 Club and the Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition of Alexandria’s Above the Influence Club are hosting a teen night from 7-10 p.m. at the Charles Houston Recreation Center (901 Wythe Street). Text “Titan” to 30644 or email Kim Hurley to attend.

Allies in Prevention Awards Luncheon (April 5)
The annual event by SCAN will honor five remarkable heroes working to protect children, support families, and prevent child abuse and neglect across Northern Virginia.

Dual Status Youth Symposium: Working Together for Our Children (April 5 – 6)
The event in Boston hosted by the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice will provide an opportunity for multi-disciplinary, youth-serving professionals to learn, network, and become part of the nationwide movement to improve outcomes for dual status youth.

Probation System Reform Symposium (April 7 – 8)
The focus of the event in Boston sponsored by the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice will be improving probation system performance and outcomes for youth managed and overseen by juvenile probation departments and court systems.

Samuel Halperin Lecture and Youth Public Service Award (April 15)
The lecture and youth award, hosted by the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) and Institute for Educational Leadership (IEL), serves as an ongoing tribute to Sam Halperin, who dedicated his life and career to improving youth education, workforce, and policy outcomes. This year’s lecture will be presented by Michele Cahill, Distinguished Fellow in Education and Youth Development at the National Center for Civic Innovation. The lecture and award are scheduled for 9 – 10:15 a.m. in the Grand Ballroom at Fairmount Hotel (2401 M Street N.W.)

National Reduce Tobacco Use Conference (April 25 – 26)
The National Reduce Tobacco Use Conference, sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth and Prevention Connections, will showcase the latest in tobacco-use prevention, reduction, and cessation with youth and young adults. The conference will take place at the Crystal Gateway Marriot (1700 Jefferson Davis Highway). Early bird registration ($300) ends February 28.

Careers/Volunteerism

Young Scholars Program
The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation is accepting applications from outstanding 7th grade students with financial need for its annual Young Scholars Program.  From 8th grade through their senior year of high of school, Cooke Young Scholars receive a personal academic and college counselor, funding for academic and enrichment programs in the summer and during the school year, internship and study abroad opportunities, and educational resources including books and technology. In addition, Young Scholars often go on to receive Cooke College Scholarships worth up to $40,000 a year, and many have received Cooke Continuing Graduate Scholarships worth up to $50,000 a year for four years. Up to seventy students will be selected to begin the Young Scholars Program when they start 8th grade in September. To be eligible, applicants must have earned mostly As in school since 6th grade — with no grades of C in English, math, science or social studies — and live and attend high school in the United States or a U.S. territory. Applications are due April 14.

Computer, Video, Game Scholarships for Women
The Entertainment Software Association Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the Entertainment Software Association, is seeking applications for scholarships for women and minority students who are pursuing degrees leading to careers in computer and video game arts. The scholarships support full-time undergraduate study at an accredited four-year college or university in the United States. Up to thirty scholarships of $3,000 each will be awarded annually, fifteen to graduating high school seniors and fifteen to current college students. Applicants must be a woman or minority student pursuing a degree leading to a career in computer and video game arts (high school seniors must already be accepted into a program). The deadline to apply is April 1. 

Alexandria Workforce Development Center Career Readiness Workshops
The Alexandria Workforce Development Center sponsors free Career Readiness Workshops. Register online or at the Workforce Development Center (1900 N. Beauregard Street). Contact Betty Sewell (703.746.5890) for additional information.

STEM Challenge
The National STEM Video Game Challenge aims to motivate interest in STEM learning among America’s youth by tapping into students’ natural passions for playing and making video games. Registration opens on March 15th and all submissions are due by August 15th. The extended submission period allows individuals and teams to enter and design their video games not only during the school year, but during the summer months as well. 

National Weather Association Essay Contest
The National Weather Association is inviting original papers on meteorological satellite applications from undergraduates. Submitted papers may include original research, case studies, or a survey of applications. The recipient of the award will receive a grant of $500, free registration at the NWA annual meeting (where he/she will present their paper), and a stipend of $500 to help cover associated travel and hotel expenses. To be eligible, applicants must be enrolled as an undergraduate at the time the paper is written and be in good academic standing at his or her college or university.  The deadline is June 1.

Student Submissions for Photography and Multimedia Competition
The Alexia Foundation is accepting submissions from students of still photography and multimedia projects that explore cultural understanding in or near their local community. Undergraduate prizes include a first-place award that includes the full cost of tuition for the Syracuse University London Program for the fall 2016 semester, a grant of $1,000 toward production costs of the proposed project, and $500 for the student’s academic department; a second-place award of half tuition for the SU London Program and a $500 cash grant to help produce the proposed project. One or more award(s) of excellence will also provide grants of $1,500 to be used for tuition at the SU London Program and a $500 cash grant to help produce the proposed project. Graduate prizes include a first-place award that includes tuition for three SU London Program classes and program fees up to a maximum of $15,000, a grant of $1,000 to help produce the proposed project, and $500 for the student’s academic department. Applicants must be duly enrolled full time in a degree program at an accredited college or university in the U.S. or abroad in the spring of 2015. The deadline for applications is March 3. 

Cooney Center Fellowships
The Cooney Center Fellows Program encourages research, innovation, and dissemination to promote children’s learning. Fellows participate in a wide range of projects and, in doing so, develop broad exposure to scholarship, policy, and practice in the field of digital media and learning. Fellowship applications are being accepted through April 4.

Youth in Custody Certificate Program
The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held May 9–13, 2016, in Washington, DC. Leaders working in juvenile justice, child welfare, mental health, substance abuse, education, and other related systems that serve youth in the custody of the juvenile justice system are invited to apply. The application deadline is March 18.

KIND People
KIND People is a program that celebrates people in the U.S. and Canada (with the exception of Quebec) who have gone out of their way to help others in need, particularly those who are vulnerable. Awards recognize people who have performed an extraordinary act of kindness or demonstrated a selfless commitment to others. The focus is on individuals who have acted with humanity to impact another person’s life or an entire community – making our world a better place. Five awards of $100,000 each and one award of $500,000 will be provided. The deadline to apply is March 31.

Lizette Patterson-Homer Injury Prevention Award
The annual award program of the American Psychological Association supports research related to the prevention of injuries in children and adolescents through accidents, violence, abuse, or suicide. A single grant of up to $5,000 will be awarded. To be eligible, applicants must be a student or faculty member at an accredited university and demonstrate research competence and commitment in his/her area of specialization. Applications are due October 1.

National Philanthropy Day Honors
The Association of Fundraising Professionals is inviting video nominations for the 2016 National Philanthropy Day Honors, an annual awards program that recognizes extraordinary generosityand commitment from donors, volunteers, foundations, businesses, and young people. Anyone can submit a nomination within six categories — Philanthropist, Volunteer Fundraiser, Corporation, Foundation, and Youth. Nominations must take the form of a short “selfie” video — a person talking to the camera about the impact the nominee has made. Videos must be uploaded to the AFP awards website no later than March 15.

College Board Award for Excellence in the Arts
The annual award recognizes and celebrates the achievements of arts initiatives that promote learning and creativity in exemplary and innovative ways for students in grades 6 to 12. The Arts Integration award recognizes a middle or high school program that uses an innovative approach to cross-curricular study, drawing connections between arts-based learning and the themes, content, and ideas of other subjects, including English language arts, science, social studies, math, and/or other areas of the 6–12 curriculum. The Equity through Arts award is given to a successful middle or high school arts program that uses the arts as a tool for increasing academic engagement among underserved students. The Civic Engagement/Professional Partnerships award recognizes a middle or high school arts program that uses arts experiences as vehicles for community engagement. Within each of these three categories, one award in the amount of $5,000 will be given to the winning schools. Among the three winning schools, one will be named the national winner and will be awarded an additional $2,500. The deadline is April 18.

Princess Grace Foundation-USA Theater Awards
The annual program offers tuition assistance for the last year of professional training at a nonprofit school located in the United States. Grants are based on tuition costs only; no other expenses ( room and board, materials, books, etc.) may be included. Apprenticeships and fellowships are provided for an individual artist nominated by a professional, nonprofit theater company. To be eligible to nominate an individual artist, the professional nonprofit theater company must employ professional artistic and administrative staff; have been in continuous operation as a nonprofit professional theater company for a minimum of three years; and have held a total of twenty weeks of rehearsal and performances for the current and previous three years. In addition, the theater must have demonstrated an ability to raise public and other private funds. The deadline is March 31.

Guggenheim Fellowships
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awards approximately two hundred fellowships a year to advanced professionals in all fields — including the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and creative arts — except the performing arts. The fellowships are intended for individuals who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. Fellowships provide grants to selected individuals over a period ranging between six and twelve months. Since the purpose of the program is to help provide fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible, fellows may spend their grant funds in any manner they deem necessary. The deadline is September 18.

Korean Arts Foundation of America Award for Visual Arts
The purpose of the award of $10,000 is to facilitate the capacity of outstanding Korean-American artists for realizing creative endeavors, nurture their artistic accomplishments, and acknowledge their presence. In addition to the cash prize, the selected recipient’s artwork will be exhibited in the Los Angeles area. Any visual medium is eligible for the award. To be eligible, applicants must be either an American citizen of Korean ancestry, a Korean with permanent residency status in the U.S., or approved by the KAFA board. Applications must be received by March 31.

Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Fellowships
The National Artist Fellowship program supports Native artists in the categories of traditional arts, music, visual arts, literature, and artistic innovation. Grants of $20,000 will be awarded in recognition of the creativity and expression of exceptional Native artists who have had significant impact in their field. Eligible applicants must be a Native artist who is enrolled as a citizen of any federally or state-recognized Native Nation or Alaska Native Corporation, or who possesses documentation of Native Hawaiian ancestry and resides in the United States. The deadline is March 21.

Dominican Studies Fellowship
The National Supermarket Association provides fellowships to doctoral students enrolled at an accredited graduate institution or faculty members in an accredited post-secondary institution who are interested in expanding research in the field of Dominican Studies. The NSA Dominican Studies Fellowship seeks to encourage innovative strides in Dominican Studies and take advantage of the resources of the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute Archives and Library collections. To that end, the institute will award fellowships of $5,000 each to two applicants. Applicants from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. International applicants are also eligible, provided they are authorized to travel to the United States. Applications must be received by March 1.

Senior Scientist Mentor Program in the Chemical Sciences
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation seeks to support emeritus faculty who maintain active research programs with undergraduates in the chemical sciences. Faculty with emeritus status on or before October 2015 who maintain active research programs in the chemical sciences may apply. Successful applicants are expected to be closely engaged in a mentoring relationship with undergraduate students. The program provides a $20,000 award over two years, intended mostly for undergraduate stipends; modest research support is also allowed. Applications are due May 18.

Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program
The Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program was established by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to increase the number of faculty from historically disadvantaged backgrounds who can achieve senior rank in academic medicine and dentistry, and who are interested in encouraging the development of future physicians and dentists from similar backgrounds. The program will award up to ten four-year postdoctoral research grants. Recipients will receive an annual stipend of up to $75,000, complemented by a $30,000 annual grant toward support of their research activities. To be eligible, applicants must be a physician or dentist from a historically disadvantaged background (ethnic, financial or educational); a citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.; and in the process of completing or finished with their formal clinical training. Applications are due March 15.

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on February 5 and February 12.

Research and Resources

Summer of Smiles
Recreation’s 2016 Summer Camps Guide is available online. 

Summer School and Enrichment Programs Announced
ACPS will offer summer enrichment programs for students from kindergarten through high school at a variety of locations. Programs include kindergarten and middle school prep programs, summer band camp, programs for middle school students needing support in math, high school students who need to make up credits or want to get ahead, and a dual language academy. The Summer Enrichment Program launched last year that incorporated a summer camp style with high standards of learning will also be offered. 

Alexandria City Public Schools Named as Seventh Best School Division
Alexandria City Public Schools has been named the seventh best school division in Virginia, according to a rankings website that rates thousands of school systems based on teaching statistics and feedback from students and parents. School divisions are ranked according to state test scores, college readiness, graduation rates, SAT, scores, ACT scores, teacher quality and student and parent reviews.

School Board Adjusts Redistricting Process But Holds Firm on Implementation Date
The Alexandria City School Board voted to extend the redistricting process into the fall of 2016 in order to facilitate the delivery of accurate details around the location of the new West End school; School Board polices that will affect redistricting and finalization of the ACPS, and City budgets before new school boundaries are drawn. Both the location of a new school in the West End and whether the City will be able to fund it will not be known until late May. Decisions around moving pre-K to a new central location will also be finalized around the same time.

Kids Need Connections
The theme of the new campaign by SCAN is when children have strong, healthy relationships with nurturing adults, they are more likely to be safer, stronger and happier children.

Being Social Media Safe: A Parents-Only Seminar
The presentation by West Coast expert Josh Ochs is designed not only to keep students safe, but to show them how social media can be used to impress colleges and future employers. It is also designed to give parents and staff a proactive way to start a dialog with students about how they are viewed online.

How to Use Social Media to Impress Colleges and Future Employers
video of the student session with West Coast expert Josh Ochs can be used to teach youth about responsible social media use.

School Board Approves Architect for Patrick Henry Project
Alexandria City School Board approved the selection of Moseley Architects to design the new Patrick Henry School and Recreation Center. Moseley Architects has the experience of working in Alexandria City and was responsible for the design of T.C. Williams High School, which was completed in 2007. The decision to use Moseley was made jointly by staff of the City of Alexandria and Alexandria City Public Schools. The architect will be tasked with designing both the new school and new recreation center to meet the minimum of LEED Silver standard.

Education

First School in Virginia to Desegregate Marks Anniversary of Integration
It was 57 years ago that three students in Arlington became the first black students to integrate a public school in Virginia, a state where elected officials fought to keep black children from attending schools with whites.

Desegregation Since the Coleman Report
The Coleman Report explored the extensiveness of racial segregation within U.S. schools and the impact of segregation on educational opportunities for black students. Quoting James S. Coleman, “The aim of racial integration in our schools should be recognized as distinct from the aim of providing equal opportunity for educational performance. To confound these two aims impedes the achievement of either”.

Are U.S. Schools Really Resegregating?
Steven Rivkin of the University of Illinois at Chicago identified a key trend masquerading as re-segregation: the decreasing enrollment share of white students due to the increasing ethnic diversity of public schools. He found black students’ likelihood of exposure to white students in 2012 was 27%, compared to 36% in the 1980s when serious desegregation efforts were underway. Although desegregation efforts have certainly waned, Rivkin attributes this more so to the changing demographic composition of schools. While black students’ share of student enrollment has remained virtually constant since 1968 (between 15 and 17%), white students’ enrollment share has declined from 80% in 1968 to 51% 2012. Over this time period, other populations, such as Hispanic and Asian students, have gained enrollment share.

In An Age of Resegregation, These Schools Are Trying to Balance Poor and Wealthy
According to new research released by the Century Foundation, a left-leaning think tank, as U.S. public schools have grown increasingly segregated by race and income, there is a growing number of school districts and charter districts striving for greater balance among their students. Researchers identified 91 school districts and charter school chains serving more than 4 million students — including the District of Columbia and Chicago public school systems — that are using tools such as magnet schools, weighted lotteries and changes in school attendance zones to create more balance between white students, and those of color and between low-income and more affluent children.

Obama Budget to Seek New Money to Help Schools Integrate, Sources Say
The Obama administration’s final budget is expected to ask for $120 million for a new competitive-grant program—called “Stronger Together“—that would help districts (or groups of districts) tackle the sticky issue of making schools more socio-economically integrated. Grantees could either use the money for planning grants, or they could move right into implementing ideas.

Parents Outraged After Students Shown “White Guilt” Cartoon for Black History Month
A Virginia school district has banned the use of an educational video about racial inequality after some parents complained that its messaging is racially divisive. The four-minute, animated video — “Structural Discrimination: The Unequal Opportunity Race” — was shown last week to students at an assembly at Glen Allen High School in Henrico County as a part of the school’s Black History Month program. The video contextualizes historic racial disparity in the United States using the metaphor of a race track in which runners face different obstacles depending upon their racial background. It has been shown hundreds of thousands of times at schools and workshops across the country since it was created more than a decade ago, according to the African American Policy Forum (which produced it).

Black History Month 2016: It’s Time to Treat Racism as a Target for Intervention
Research published in 2014 by the American Psychological Association found people perceive black boys as bigger and older than they actually are. Newly published research from the University of Iowa found seeing the faces of just kindergarten-aged black boys was sufficient to send white study participants into heightened-threat mode. The United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent expressed concern about deeply ingrained racial discrimination in U.S. schools. Black students are likelier to have less access to advanced courses, have more inexperienced teachers, attend schools where overall climate for learning is deficient, and face tougher disciplinary consequences than their white peers. While black boys were suspended or expelled from school three times more often than white boys during the 2011-2012 school year, black girls were suspended from school six times more often than white girls. The median net worth for black households in 2011 was lower than it was in 1984, while white households’ net worth was almost 11% higher. In 2011-12, black children were most likely to live in neighborhoods their parents reported as never or sometimes safe.

What It Was Like to Walk in the Shoes of America’s Slaves
photography project illuminates what it would have been like to walk in the shoes of slaves escaping to the north. For two and a half years, Jeanine Michna-Bales photographed in the dead of night, moving through the woods and outskirts of towns where slaves may have tread. The resulting work shows some of the most beautiful landscapes in America, from the swamps of central Mississippi to the lucid St. Clair River at the edge of Canada — tainted by the underlying fear of encountering a slave catcher at any moment. The business of head hunting was very profitable, since slave owners were inclined to protect the “investment” they had made in a slave, which cost an average of $35,000 in 1850, according to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

Compared to their Classmates, Kids of Color More Likely to Be Removed By Schools
New KIDS COUNT data show that black and American Indian kids are more likely to be suspended — and much more likely to be expelled — from school than their white, Latino or Asian classmates. Kids removed from school can quickly fall behind and struggle to graduate.

For Preservice Teachers, Lessons on Cultural Sensitivity
The “Talking While Black” scenario is one of several that Ph.D. candidate Elizabeth Self has designed at Vanderbilt to give teachers-in-training the ability to recognize how bias can manifest itself in schools.

In Schools, Teacher Quality Matters Most
Of the characteristics that were measured in the Coleman Report, “those that bear the highest relationship to pupil achievement are first, the teacher’s score on the verbal skills test, and then his educational background”.

 

2016 Building a Grad Nation Data Brief: Overview of 2013-14 High School Graduation Rates
publication released by Civic Enterprises and Everyone Graduates Center shows that nationally 74.6% of low-income students graduated on time compared to 89% of non-low-income students – a 14.4 percentage point gap.

Education in America: The Low-Income Gap (Video)
video explores why many low-income students drop out of high school — “because they don’t see hope” — and points out the impact of dropping out: without a high school diploma, youth are twice as likely to hold a minimum-wage job. 

State Laws That Can Lead to School Arrests Targeted for Change
In response to the video that showed a school resource officer throwing a student across the room, state lawmakers are trying to revise South Carolina’s “disrupting a school” statute, which prohibits acting “in an obnoxious manner” in a school and behavior that interferes with or disturbs “in any way or in any place the students or teachers of any school or college”. “We’re criminalizing what is a lot of routine student behavior,” said Sarah Hinger, a staff lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union. “What student disruptions rise to the point of being criminal is very much dependent on how school officials and police officers react and interact with that behavior”. 

GOP-Led States Increasingly Taking Control From Local School Boards
Governors in Michigan, Arkansas, Nevada, Wisconsin, Georgia, Ohio and elsewhere — mostly Republican leaders who otherwise champion local control in their fights with the federal government — say they are intervening in cases of chronic academic or financial failure and sidelining local officials. They say they have a moral obligation to act when it is clear that local efforts have not led to improvement. But the takeovers have sparked angry protests, legal challenges and bitter complaints of racism. All state takeovers to date have occurred in school districts that are impoverished and majority African American and Latino. “These proposals are not really about school reform or improvement,” said Philip Lanoue, the 2015 national Superintendent of the Year. He runs a school district in Georgia, where Gov. Nathan Deal (R) wants to change the state constitution to enable state takeovers. “These takeovers are entangled with money and power and control.”

The Constitutional Change That Could Make Virginia More Welcoming to Charter Schools
Under Virginia law, only local school boards can approve charter schools. Since board members tend to view these public school alternatives as unwelcome competition, only nine charters have been approved in the state since the law was enacted 18 years ago. Now these same monopoly protectors are leading the fight against a modest reform of the law being considered by the General Assembly. An editorial in the Washington Post advised Virginia lawmakers to put the long-term interest of students, particularly children at risk, over the self-interest of the education establishment. 

Charter School Amendment Dies in Virginia Senate
Legislation to amend the state constitution to promote charter schools went down in a surprising defeat in the Virginia Senate. The denial of the measure was a blow to conservatives, who got the Republican-led House and Senate to pass an identical resolution last year. Democrats who led the charge against the bill said it would undermine the authority of local school boards.

Va.’s Governor Wants to Remake High School Education
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe wants to redesign high school in the commonwealth, putting more emphasis on preparing teens for the workforce and creating more opportunities for them to get college credit while in high school. McAuliffe (D) wants to give the Virginia Board of Education the authority to go back to the drawing board to determine what students need to know to be a part of the 21st-century workforce and decide the high school requirements from there. In January, he pushed a bill in the House and Senate to revamp those requirements.

Christensen Institute Offers Database to Compare School Blended Learning Models
In an effort to help schools explore blended learning, a think tank has created an updated online nationwide database of schools using the strategy, in the hope that educators will communicate and learn from one another. The Clayton Christensen Institute’s education program recently revamped and expanded the site, called the Blended Learning Universe, with new features that allow for customizable searches and the ability to track changes over time. The nonprofit institute has long pushed for schools to use technology to improve teaching and learning.

Obama to Officially Nominate John B. King Jr. as Education Secretary
Since taking office last month, King has talked a lot about his own background—he’s Puerto Rican and African-American and lost his parents (both educators) early. He credits New York City public school teachers with “saving” his life. And civil rights advocates have been happy with his comments about the importance of preserving equity for disadvantaged students as states craft their plans to implement ESSA, the latest iteration of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

 

Reversing a Raw Deal
Education Week produced a full multimedia report from Mississippi and New Mexico, where inadequate internet access is putting students in rural schools at an academic disadvantage. The Calhoun County school district pays $9,275 a month for the slowest internet service in all of Mississippi (The Slowest Internet in Mississippi). In New Mexico cattle-ranching country, harsh geography and a lack of competition lead to astronomical bills for schools desperate to get their students online (They Rake Us Over the Coals). The federal effort to deliver affordable high-speed Internet to rural schools has brought new hope to one of Mississippi’s most disconnected districts (Washington Gave Us Leverage).

ACLU, Tenth Amendment Center Join Forces on Data Privacy
An unusual partnership between the American Civil Liberties Union and the Tenth Amendment Center is pushing states to adopt model legislation that the organizations argue will fill in gaps in student-data-privacy protections. Proposed overhauls of digital-privacy laws, including many that regulate relationships between ed-tech vendors and school districts, were simultaneously introduced in 16 states and the District of Columbia last month in bills based on the model legislation.

Google Acknowledges Data Mining Student Users Outside Apps for Education
Online-services giant Google has acknowledged that it collects and data-mines for some commercial purposes a wide range of personal information on student users who log in through its popular Apps for Education service, then venture to the company’s search engine and other products.

With Computer Science Ed. Gaining Momentum, Girls Still Well Behind
Females continue to be severely underrepresented in both computer science courses at all levels and in the technology workforce. Ten states had fewer than 10 girls take the Advanced Placement computer science exam in 2015. A recent study by Google and Gallup found that boys are more confident than girls in their ability to learn computer science, and more likely to believe they will have a job one day in which they will use the subject.

STEM Teacher Tool: Free Videos on ‘Super Small Science”
NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation have released a series of short videos about nanotechnology – the study of objects that are measured in billionths of meters. The half dozen “Nanotechnology: Super Small Science” videos are about five minutes each and available for free on the NBC Learn and NSF websites. One video features researchers discussing the nanotechnology used in smartphones. Another discusses nanoscale coatings and layers that can make surfaces water and dirt-resistant and protect steel bridges.

Fitbits Now Mandatory for Students at This Oklahoma University
All 900 freshmen at Oral Roberts University are required to use Fitbits, the wearable fitness monitors, as part of a new college requirement that began last fall and will be rolled out with each incoming class until all students are using them. The student Fitbits wirelessly report only the number of steps and heart rate information to a school computer, which logs the data. No other personal information is recorded by the school. Students are required to average 10,000 steps per day and 150 minutes of intense activity (as measured by heart rate) each week. The data comprise a portion of their grade in health and physical education classes.

Is More Physical Education at School Linked to Higher Student Math Scores?
The amount of time students spend doing physical activity in school appears to be linked to higher standardized math scores in D.C. schools, according to a new American University study that examined the success of the city’s Healthy Schools Act and found that schools offering more physical activity had significantly better math success.

Getting a Read on the App Stores: A Market Scan and Analysis of Children’s Literacy Apps
In 2014, the Joan Ganz Cooney Center and New America conducted a scan of the market for language and literacy apps targeted for young children in the Apple, Google Play, and Amazon app stores. Getting a Read on the App Stores (Executive Summaryfull report) analyzes the descriptions of the apps as well as their content to learn more about what parents are likely to encounter as they search for educational apps for their young children. The report covers recent trends and recommendations for developers who are creating apps for children, as well as for parents and teachers looking for quality apps to teach foundational language and literacy skills to young children.

Luminosity, Other Brain-Training Products Get Federal Scrutiny
Lumosity is one of the best-known of a slew of new app and computer-based programs intended to help students improve working memory (the system the brain uses to hold information during decision-making and analysis). So-called “brain training” programs designed to help boost students’ attention and working memory are coming under scrutiny from the Federal Trade Commission, as some claims have outpaced both the initial hopes and subsequent evidence.

Can Brain Games Keep Aging Minds Young? There’s An App for That, Says Scientists
In 2014, a group of scientists issued a statement complaining that claims about the effects of brain games were being trumped up. Laura Carstensen, director of the Stanford Center of Longevity, told the New York Times assertions that games could keep Alzheimer’s at bay were particularly “unconscionable”. Dan Hurley, a science journalist who delved into the research for his book Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power, agrees that some companies are “overly vigorous” in their claims, but also said the medical literature shows that many games are effective. “It’s not a bunch of snake oil,” he said. “There’s serious work going on.” One knock on brain games is the idea that they are simply teaching the participant how to get better at a specific task, but Hurley said evidence is piling up that the improvements stick around and spill over into other areas of life.

Universal Autism Screening Lacks Evidence of Benefit, Medical Panel Finds
The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force—an influential and independent group of experts in prevention and primary care—has said that there is insufficient evidence to show that screening all young children for autism is beneficial. The task force’s decision is not a recommendation against screening, it said, but rather an acknowledgement it does not have enough information to weigh whether the potential benefits of early intervention balance out potential harms, such as anxiety from a false positive or money and resources wasted on unneeded treatment. The panel’s decision runs counter to recommended practice from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which says that all children should be screened for autism spectrum disorder at 18 months and at 24 months, or whenever a parent or health care provider sees issues of concern. In the view of the pediatrics group, universal screening allows more children to benefit from early intervention.

 

Could $1 Billion Make Teaching the Best Job in the World?
The U.S. Department of Education is pitching a $1 billion program toward that end as part of its fiscal year 2017 budget request. Under its proposal, districts would use the funds to improve teacher salaries, working conditions, and professional development. Overall, the initiative also aims to help improve the distribution of teacher talent, something the agency has struggled to get states to do. The federal program, called RESPECT: The Best Job In the World, would award competitive grants of $50 million to $250 million to states, which would then offer subgrants to school districts. With the cash, districts would aim to implement the following activities: create teacher-advancement opportunities; increase flexibility for teacher professional development; improve teachers’ working conditions and school climate. 

National Network Seeks to Get More H.S. Students Interested in Teaching
Educators Rising, formerly known as Future Educators Association, is a national network working to help school systems guide young people on the path to teaching starting in high school. Launched last August, the free service connects teachers and school leaders with expertise and resources to support them in preparing students interested in teaching—and ultimately in building stronger local pipelines of future educators.

Colleges Seek Out Future Special Ed. Teachers
With the need for special education teachers in Utah far outstripping the supply, teacher educators at Utah State University are not letting any potential prospects slip through the cracks. For high school students, the university has created a dual-credit class that allows them to learn more about special education while they also provide volunteer support to their classmates with disabilities. A highlight of the program is a visit to a campus of the university, where the high schoolers dine with university professors who impress upon them just how much they are wanted in the teaching profession.

New Web Tool Spotlights Mismatches Between Education and Labor Market
Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce has unveiled an interactive web tool that pinpoints each state’s job market needs and shows how well colleges and universities are aiming students into those high-demand areas. The website allows users to choose a state, and examine data about its college pipeline and employment demands. Each state’s profile shows a list of the employers with the biggest online recruiting presence. It displays the percentage of online job ads that seek people with bachelor’s degrees, and names the top fastest-growing “occupational cluster” for college graduates. 

Nation’s Prominent Public Universities Are Shifting to Out-of-State Students
America’s most prominent public universities were founded to serve the people of their states, but they are enrolling record numbers of students from elsewhere to maximize tuition revenue as state support for higher education withers. Forty-three of the 50 schools known as “state flagships” enrolled a smaller share of freshmen from within their states in 2014 than they had a decade earlier, federal data show. At ten flagships, state residents formed less than half the freshman class.

For a Slot at a 4-Year University, Some North Carolina Students Could Soon Need a Community College Degree
North Carolina is considering a major change to its higher education admittance system. Students who are admitted at four-year colleges and universities in North Carolina, but then identified as the least well prepared would have to attend two-year institutions. But once they complete associate degrees within three years, they would be guaranteed enrollment at the four-year institutions. The North Carolina Guaranteed Admission Program, or NCGAP, would begin with the cohort of students entering college in the fall of 2017.

Amid National Backlash, Mount St. Mary’s President Defends His Tenure in Letter to Parents
The president of Mount St. Mary’s University defended his tenure at the private college in Maryland in a letter to parents and he said he had taken “the high road” despite intense public scrutiny of his recent actions. Newman was quoted in the student newspaper as saying (in a private conversation with colleagues about his plan to usher out 20 to 25 freshmen early in the fall semester as part of an effort to improve the retention rate at the liberal-arts school) that there would be collateral damage. He said a professor needed to stop thinking of freshmen as cuddly bunnies. “You just have to drown the bunnies … put a Glock to their heads.”

Vindictive Principals Destroy Morale
Despite a career that led to Tom Porton’s induction into the National Teachers Hall of Fame and other awards, he handed in his retirement papers after retaliation by his principal for insubordination. Porton’s offense was distributing flyers that were not part of the Common Core curriculum.  Specifically, they listed nonsexual ways of making love, such as reading a book together.

 

At Success Academy School, a Stumble in Math and a Teacher’s Anger on Video
A 1st-grade girl sits next to her teacher in a circle of students, who are arranged in cross-legged positions with hands folded in their laps. As the teacher tells the girl to try counting again, this time correctly, the girl breaks formation, shifting from side to side. “Count,” the teacher orders in a low voice. Barely audible, the girl counts to two before looking back at her teacher. The teacher grabs the girl’s paper, rips it in half, and with a raised voice tells her: “Go to the calm-down chair and sit.” The scene unfolds in a minute-long video recorded secretly by the assistant teacher and leaked to the New York Times. 

D.C. Public Schools, Closely Watched for Its Reform Efforts, Is Overhauling Teacher Evaluation and Training
D.C. Public Schools officials have announced sweeping changes to the school system’s teacher training and evaluation systems that could profoundly affect how the system judges its teachers and how it seeks to help them improve. Teachers will meet weekly with small groups of colleagues who teach the same subject and they will work with a coach who is an expert in that subject and can help tweak lesson plans and address the nitty-gritty questions that teachers face in their classrooms.

Flint’s Former Manager Resigns as Head of Detroit Schools
The state-appointed emergency manager of the Detroit Public Schools, who had also managed the city of Flint and oversaw its decision to draw its water from the Flint River, resigned the day before a congressional committee hearing in Washington on Flint’s water.

Flint Educator: Our Water Crisis is a Crisis of Trust
For decades, research has shown that students learn best when schools and families work together. One of the main reasons schools struggle to create partnerships with the parental community is a lack of public confidence in school effectiveness, teacher competence, and the integrity of school leaders. To foster family and community partnerships with schools, trust is not an option – it is the foundation.

Flint Superintendent Asks Congress for Aid, Understanding
The superintendent of the Flint, Mich., schools testified before Congress, telling federal lawmakers that the “day has come to stop asking the children of the Flint community to pay the price for the mistakes of others. For our students, life has changed. There is the constant stress over unsafe water that disrupts the life of a community that already faces a multitude of challenges. There is an inherent struggle between trying to balance the educational needs of the students while meeting their physical and emotional needs in light of this crisis. Across the city, the threat of significant disability is even more serious for Flint’s youngest students, those not yet in school, or the unborn.” Superintendent Bilal Tawwab told the Democratic lawmakers the district will need help securing resources to develop early intervention programs to support students suffering from the effects of lead exposure and hire educational specialists trained to work with the students.

Repair Bill for Decaying Detroit Schools Could Top $50 Million
The outgoing emergency manager of the Detroit public schools estimates it would cost more than $50 million to address the immediate maintenance issues in the district’s aging buildings. The district announced $300,000 will be redirected to handle existing work orders, property maintenance, and safety violations uncovered by the city during recent inspections. Under orders from Mayor Mike Duggan, city workers have inspected about half of Detroit’s nearly 100 schools, uncovering issues with mold, rodents, and broken glass. To protest the school conditions, teachers staged several sickouts in the past six weeks, calling in sick in such large numbers that classes had to be canceled in dozens of schools. Detroit’s teachers’ union sued the district last month demanding that Gov. Rick Snyder remove Darnell Earley, the emergency manager, immediately. Earley plans to leave the district by the end of February, months before his scheduled departure. 

Crumbling, Mold-Infested Detroit School Gets Celebrity Attention, $500K Donation
Ellen DeGeneres secured $500,000 from Lowe’s Companies, Inc. “in technology, materials for renovations around the campus, and funding for additional staff” for a Detroit school.

Harford Count Suspends School Trips to Baltimore, Citing Safety Concerns
Harford County’s school system has banned field trips to Baltimore indefinitely, citing safety concerns following the unrest over the death of Freddie Gray and the subsequent trials of police officers charged in his death. City leaders called the decision misguided and ill-informed, saying it denies Harford schoolchildren cultural, educational and recreational opportunities and reinforces negative stereotypes about the city.

All Pennsylvania Schools Will Carry Opioid Overdose Drug
Governor Tom Wolfe announced all Pennsylvania schools will be offered a free case of naloxone nasal spray, a drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, in a partnership between the state, a drug company, and the Clinton Health Matters Initiative. The announcement comes as schools across the country are considering stocking naloxone in response to growing concerns about the abuse of prescription drugs and heroin by people of all ages. Some state and local government agencies have implemented new requirements for school nurses to stock the drug, and some have eased requirements to allow a broader range of health care professionals to administer it.

Financial Crisis in Chicago’s Schools Deepens Discord
The financial uncertainty that stalks the Chicago school system increased when, in less than a day, the teachers’ union rejected a contract offer from the administration, the district announced $100 million in cuts, and Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner pledged to move ahead with plans to take over the district and push it into bankruptcy. All of this unfolded while Mayor Rahm Emanuel—who has authority over the city’s schools—reportedly traveled to New York City to convince financiers to back an $875 million bond sale that would raise cash to keep the schools running for the rest of the school year.

Maine Governor Paul LePage Blocks Rules Protecting Trans Students
Maine’s Republican governor has blocked the state’s Department of Education and Human Rights Commission from issuing legally binding rules that would guarantee transgender students equal access. Instead, schools statewide will be encouraged to abide by “guidelines” issued by the Human Rights Commission about how to treat transgender students, but will not face penalties for failing to comply with these suggestions. The formal rules were drafted by the Maine Human Rights Commission and the Department of Education in response to a 2014 ruling from Maine’s high court in the case of a transgender student who was denied access to the girls’ bathroom (after years of using that facility without incident) at her elementary school.

LePage Withdraws Nominee Amid Spat Over Transgender Rules
Maine Gov. Paul Page is temporarily withdrawing his nomination for education commissioner amid a disagreement with lawmakers over issues related to transgender students .LePage said he halted Bill Beardsley’s nomination after learning that Democrats plan to use the confirmation hearing as a platform to advance an “activist political agenda.”

Schools Across Mississippi Receive Bomb Threats
Schools across Mississippi received bomb threats on the afternoon of February 9. Investigations are underway in seven Mississippi school districts.

L.A. Unified Bars Federal Immigration Agents From Its Campuses
The Los Angeles Unified school board passed a resolution that bars immigration agents from visiting its campuses to search for undocumented students. Despite reassurance from federal agents that schools are safe havens, some families remain afraid to send their kids to school after ICE carried out a series of raids across the country last month in search of Central American immigrants who arrived in the country as unauthorized immigrants after Jan. 1, 2014.

Youth Well-Being

Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development Biennial Conference
Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development began in the 1990s as an evidence-based registry of programs dedicated to violence prevention. It now studies programs for a wide range of youth outcomes, including academic success, mental health, and physical health. Researchers have evaluated hundreds of programs and given 61 their seal of approval as either promising or model programs. The conference will feature sessions on evidence-based programs that promote youth education, healthy behaviors, emotional and physical well-being and positive behaviors.

President Obama Proposes New ‘First Job’ Funding to Connect Young Americans with Jobs and Skills Training to Start Their Careers
The White House announced it will include a $5.5 billion plan to boost employment for young people in a budget proposal. The plan includes $3.5 billion to create new partnerships with companies and communities to get nearly 1 million youth into a first job during the summer. The investment also aims to help 150,000 young people who have been out of school and work into a job for as long as a year. In addition, the plan includes $2 billion to help young people who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so to get their diploma and enroll in postsecondary education or find a job. The grants would be administered jointly by the Labor and Education departments.

Leading After-school Group Disappointed by Obama Budget
The administration released its $4 trillion budget request for fiscal year 2017, calling for $1 billion in funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Center initiative, a $167 million cut from this year’s appropriation. “At this time when one in five students is unsupervised after the school day ends, it is a real disappointment that the administration is not proposing to at least continue the slow, steady progress toward making afterschool programs — and the safe, supervised, hands-on learning opportunities they offer — available to all students,” Jodi Grant, executive director of the Afterschool Alliance, said in a news release.

Opportunity for All? Technology and Learning in Lower-Income Families
research report released by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop found lower-income families in the United States have near-universal access to the Internet and some kind of digital device, but they are often at a disadvantage when it comes to the quality and consistency of their connections, especially when they are limited to mobile devices such as smartphones.

Connecting to Learn: Promoting Digital Equity for America’s Hispanic Families
Three publications tackle the issue of Hispanic families and digital technologies from different angles: Aprendiendo en casa reveals findings from a national survey of parents; Connecting to Learn aims to improve digital equity among low-income Hispanic families through national policies; and Digital Media and Latino Families takes a close look at the implications of this proliferation of new technologies for family and community relationships.

Study Explores How Black Men Find Success in College
Shaun Harper, a professor and executive director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania, surveyed more than 140 students at 30 predominantly white public and private colleges. One finding was that while high-achieving black male students are not immune to racial stereotypes, they have found a way to push back against them — often through taking on confidence-building campus leadership roles that can change perceptions of them among their white peers and faculty.

 

Arne Duncan, Anna Spangler Nelson and Paul Tagliabue to Join Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics
Knight Foundation President and Chief Executive Officer Alberto Ibargüen announced the appointment of Arne Duncan, Anna Spangler Nelson, and Paul Tagliabue to the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. Duncan recently stepped down as U.S. Secretary of Education. Tagliabue is the former commissioner of the National Football League, and Nelson is chairman of Spangler Companies and serves on the University of North Carolina Board of Governors.

Barry Sanders: Should You Let Your Kids Play Football?
In the opinion of Barry Sanders, parents should allow their children to continue playing, but they must “be aware of the risks,” specifically in regard to brain injuries. Though he expressed his belief that rule changes are making football safer than ever, he also warned about the potential long-term ramifications of concussions.

Florida Students Create App to Prevent Football Concussions
A group of Florida middle school students has won a $20,000 grant from Verizon for inventing an app that helps prevent football concussions. Students at Pine Crest Middle School in Fort Lauderdale won the award for their mobile app concept for   monitoring the force of impact sustained on player helmets.

Probe: Plano East Athletes Subjected to Racist Comments, ‘Fight Club’
Two Plano East Senior High baseball coaches subjected their team to racist comments and belittled injured students, according to a school district investigation that also found players participated in an annual “fight club.”

 

‘Chasing the Dragon” FBI Film Aims to Reach Kids Before Drug Addiction Does
The new film begins with a stark observation: FBI and DEA research shows that about 46,000 people die from drug abuse annually in the U.S., more than the combined number of Americans who are killed in car accidents and because of gun violence. Half of those deaths are related to opiate drug abuse. The cause for alarm at the FBI is the rocketing number of deaths from heroin, which often is a cheaper alternative on the black market to brand-name prescription drugs. In 2014, heroin overdose deaths peaked at 10,000. In the past decade alone, the number of new heroin users has doubled. The FBI and DEA plan to distribute 10,000 copies of the new video to all of its 56 field offices for nationwide classroom educational use. The video was specially produced with teenagers in mind and includes tearful interviews with recovering addicts who started using in high school. Rather than pushing the sobering data to parents, the FBI hopes to make a personal connection with the kids.

How to Talk to Kids About Drugs – And How Not To
From their own experiences, young adults in recovery share what we should — and should not say — to young people who may be using drugs or alcohol. “One of the worst things you can do is add anxiety to that situation… pass judgment…”

If They Had Asked: Young People in Recovery Reflect on What Could Have Been
Three young men in recovery reflect on their youth and how their addictions were mishandled by their mentors, teachers and coaches.

White House Seeks Nearly $1.2 Billion for Drug Prevention, Treatment, Overdose Response
White House officials announced they will seek nearly $1.2 billion in new federal funding over the next two years to address the growing problem of heroin and prescription opioid use, The centerpiece of the proposal is $1 billion in mandatory funding over two years to expand access to treatment for prescription drug abuse and heroin use, $920 million of which would go to the states. Another $500 million, some of which is a continuation of existing funds, would support work by the departments of Health and Human Services and Justice to expand not just treatment but access to the overdose-reversal drug naloxone, and support targeted enforcement activities. Federal funding for the current fiscal year supports grants for medication-assisted treatment for opioid use in 22 states. The president’s new budget request would expand that number to 45.

Q&A: How Homeless Youth Programs Can Benefit from Drug-Free Communities Funding
According to the program director of Our Family Services in Tuscon, Arizona, “We know that a lot of our runaway and homeless youth use substances, but it’s hard to know when and why they started. Is it because they’ve grown up with [substance abuse] in their family and seen it, or do they use substances because that’s what led them to become homeless or get on the street? Maybe being homeless became too much so they turned to substances. If agencies can do a better job answering these questions with the Drug-Free Communities grant, perhaps we can get enough education out there so kids don’t use substances if they do become homeless. Or if we prevent kids from using drugs at an earlier age, it may be a protective factor for them not becoming homeless at all.”

 

A Snapshot of Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Programs for Youth
fact sheet by the Office of Administration of Children & Families provides descriptive characteristics of Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education programs serving youth, characteristics of those served, and the most commonly used curricula, program goals, and expected outcomes.

How Do African American Boys and Young Men View Healthy Dating Relationships?
Researchers wanted to explore the qualities African American boys and young men attribute to healthy teen dating relationships. The authors interviewed 18 African American males, ages 13 to 21, from schools, neighborhoods, and community youth groups in the Washington, D.C. area. The researchers began each interview with two questions: “What do you value in a dating relationship?” and “What makes a relationship healthy?” Four main themes emerged: trust, good communication, connection and compatibility, and respect.   
4 Ways to Prevent Violence By Promoting Healthy Relationships During Childhood
It is a common scenario among elementary school classrooms and playgrounds. A little boy hits or pushes a female classmate, who is told that he “probably did it because he likes you.” The response is often meant as a harmless way to calm children down after the event, but it can establish and reinforce the belief that hitting is an acceptable form of love, says Kole Wyckhuys, prevention education program director at HAVEN in Pontiac, Michigan. The agency, which works with victims of domestic and sexual violence countywide, began visiting elementary school classes about 25 years ago to introduce students to age-appropriate messages about respecting their bodies. Delivering violence prevention messages early on can lay the foundation for healthy dating relationships, Wyckhuys says, and give children a lifelong sense of ownership over their bodies and emotions.

Meeting the Needs of Kids in the U.S. Who Fled Violence in Central America
Young people coming from Central America and crossing the southwest border into the United States are fleeing staggering levels of violence. In the Northern Triangle of Central America (Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador) “organized crime has infiltrated the highest levels of government”. Last year, 17,500 people were killed, numbers that are just behind the numbers in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan.

What Makes Youth More Likely to Be Involved in Both Peer and Dating Violence?
Researchers wanted to know what factors make young people more or less likely to be involved in physical violence with both their peers and dating partners. They also wanted to see how those factors might differ for boys versus girls. The authors surveyed a racially diverse sample of more than 4,000 eighth through tenth grade students in three North Carolina counties in the fall of 2003, and again the following spring. Among male and female participants, holding prosocial beliefs (beliefs linked with positive social behaviors such as being honest) was considered a protective factor for both peer and dating violence. By contrast, anger, family conflict, and exposure to aggressive behavior at school were shared risk factors, regardless of gender.

Male Classmate Provided Gun Used in Arizona Murder-Suicide
Authorities say a male classmate provided the handgun used in last week’s murder-suicide involving two 15-year-old girls at Glendale’s Independence High School. Glendale police say one of the girls approached the 15-year-old boy, telling him she needed it for protection but promised to return the gun the following day. Police say the unidentified boy removed a handgun from his home without the permission or knowledge of his parents.

4 Tips for Leveraging Communities of Faith to Support Victims of Domestic Violence
A trainer working to end domestic violence in Muslim communities, Salma Abugideiri has worked closely with Islamic religious leaders in Virginia and beyond to educate them about family violence. Thousands of miles away in Seattle, the Faith Trust Institute works to provide faith communities and advocates with the tools they need to address religious and cultural issues related to abuse. Jane Fredricksen, its Executive Director, encourages anti-violence programs to view religious communities as resources in their own work, whether partnering with faith leaders or encouraging survivors to embrace spirituality as a source of support. Abugideiri and Fredricksen identified four ways anti-violence organizations can put that advice into practice.

Q&A: Aaron Steed of Meathead Movers on Offering Free Moving Services to Victims of Domestic Violence
Meathead Movers, a moving company based out of San Luis Obispo, California, is helping victims of domestic violence by providing them with free moving services. Using the social media campaign #MoveToEndDV, the company also encourages other businesses to donate a service or product to local shelters that aid domestic violence victims. So far, 125 businesses have taken the pledge to donate.

 

Faces of Human Trafficking
nine-part video series is designed to help service providers, law enforcement, prosecutors, and communities raise awareness of human trafficking. The series addresses sex and labor trafficking, multidisciplinary approaches to serving victims of human trafficking, juvenile victims of human trafficking, effective victim services, victims’ legal needs, and voices of survivors. A discussion guide, fact sheets, and posters accompany the video series.

In New Orleans, An Anti-Trafficking Task Force Introduces Best Practices and Partnerships
The New Orleans City Council passed an ordinance that prohibits strip clubs and other “adult venues” from hiring anyone under the age of 21. The measure, designed to help prevent the trafficking of youth that sometimes occurs at these establishments, marked an early victory for a citywide task force created to stop trafficking and support survivors.

5 Ways Safe Harbor Laws Support Young Victims of Commercial Sexual Exploitation
In 2008, New York became the first state to stop prosecuting young victims of commercial sexual exploitation with the Safe Harbor for Exploited Children Act. Since then, 33 more states have adopted varying safe harbor laws, decriminalizing youth arrested for prostitution and providing services to help them heal and move forward.

The 12 Core Concepts for Understanding Traumatic Stress Responses in Children and Families – Adapted for Youth Who Are Trafficked
Resources compiled by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) foster an understanding of the impact of trafficking on young people, their families, and their broader caregiving system. Young people who have been sexually exploited may find it difficult to distinguish between safe and unsafe situations, for example, even after they have been distanced from their trafficker.

What’s Sharing Power Got to Do with Trauma-Informed Practice?
Sharing power is a deliberate approach to engagement with families, youth, and children. It seeks to combine the knowledge and training of the provider with the lived experience of the families receiving services. When shared power is incorporated, the families receiving services will be more invested in reaching goals, more satisfied with services, and more hopeful about managing life beyond the service relationship.

Comprehensive Human Trafficking Assessment Tool
An assessment developed by the National Human Trafficking Resource Center helps frontline professionals take a victim-centered approach to identify and assist youth who have experienced trafficking. Suggestions include conducting safety checks with victims before asking any questions, adjusting body language to convey openness and interest, and mirroring victims’ language to build trust. A female victim who says she is dating her trafficker, for example, may respond better to conversations about her “boyfriend” if that is the term she uses. The center’s online resource library also offers assessment tools customized for domestic violence programs, medical professionals, and programs serving runaway and homeless youth.

Can an Adapted Group Therapy Model Help Female Victims of Commercial Sexual Exploitation?
Researchers wanted to know whether Putting the Pieces Back Together, an adapted group intervention originally for female prisoners who had been abused, could help adolescent girls who had experienced—or were at risk of—sexual exploitation. They conducted a pilot study with ten young women, each of whom had been trafficked, had engaged in survival sex (i.e., trading sex for resources like shelter or food), or had a history of abuse. The researchers identified four parts of Putting the Pieces Back Together that were instrumental to helping sexually exploited girls move through their recovery. These include educating participants about domestic minor sex trafficking, providing opportunities for youth to help and support each other, using dialogue as a tool for reducing feelings of stigma and shame, and developing skills to deal with powerful feelings.

 

National Initiative Uses Lunch to Combat Growing Public Health Threat
When people talk about health risks in schools, they are usually talking about obesity. But a growing body of research points to a potentially more dangerous public health threat: social isolation. A recent study found that social isolation, or the lack of social connection, poses as great a health risk as obesity, smoking, and alcohol abuse. The threat of social isolation is compounded in schools, as it tends to be a precursor to bullying, self-harm and community violence. For many students, the loneliest time of day happens at lunchtime.

Family Meals
Children in poorer families, and those whose parents had less education, are more likely to have meals together with their families than are children of wealthier or more educated parents.

How Not To Raise a Workaholic
Contrary to its intended purpose, children’s lopsided school-to-life ratio is not readying them for success in life. It is instead creating a generation of tiny workaholics — burnt-out, stressed and paradoxically underprepared for the challenges of the post-academic working world. For instance, children who spend more time in less structured activities (such as reading, drawing, free play or social outings) are better at setting and accomplishing their own goals than those whose pursuits were more scripted, according to researchers from the University of Colorado in Boulder. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, a neuroscientist at UCLA, has found that when subjects’ minds are free to wander without any immediate task, they develop stronger memories, cognitive skills, and social-emotional skills. Overprescribed school and home lives may also help explain the documented decline in measures of children’s creative thinking since 1990.

Parenting Skills Boosted by Video Feedback, Study Finds
For parents in poverty, constant physical and financial insecurity can create stress and depression that make it harder to build healthy relationships with their children. A new study in the journal Pediatrics suggests pointing parents to the positive aspects of their interactions with their little ones can both reduce Mom’s stress and improve her children’s cognitive development and behavior.

The Importance of High School Mentors
Serious risks like homelessness, suspension, early parenthood, and a lack of academic confidence threaten to derail poor, young Americans on their path toward high-school graduation. Yet a growing body of research—including a study last year by America’s Promise Alliance that found students with social support are more likely to re-engage with school in the face of adversity—suggests that the United States should invest broadly in mentorship.

Senior Citizens as Mentors
Just as there is a Peace Corps, maybe it is time to develop a Mentor Corps composed of senior citizens. Their maturity and experience may be just what is required to help young people.  It would be an ideal symbiotic relationship.

Youth Voting
Voting among young adults has fallen since the 1972 presidential election, causing concern among lawmakers and other policy leaders. While voting has also declined among older voters, the trend is steeper among younger voters. Studies examining the reasons for this decline in voting find that many youth feel uninformed about politics and the electoral process. A study conducted by the National Assessment of Educational Progress found that one-third of high school seniors lack a basic understanding of how the American government operates. The New Millennium Report, issued by the National Association of Secretaries of State, also found that youth believe that government and elections are not relevant to things they care about. It has been suggested that this may be why many prefer to engage in community service, which is on the rise among youth.

SCAN Legislative Agenda
The three main agenda items SCAN will be focusing on in 2016 are early education, foster care and youth, and kinship

Juvenile Justice 

Why Are LA’s Foster Kids More Likely to Be Charged with Crimes?
The use of arrests to control the behavior of foster youth is reportedly an all-too-common practice in many group homes. Denise C. Herz, associate professor of criminal justice at California State University, Los Angeles, has analyzed data on crossover youth in Los Angeles County since 2007. Crossover youth, or dual status youth, is a term for children who are victims of abuse or neglect who also enter the juvenile justice system. Herz found that 32% of the foster youth who were arrested were living in group homes. She also found that African-American youth were greatly overrepresented among the crossover kids. In addition, girls comprised 36.6% percent of the crossover population, as opposed to 20% in the general juvenile justice population. 

ABA Task Force Wants to Help Disrupt School-to-Prison Pipeline
Joined by the American Bar Association (ABA) Pipeline Council and the ABA’s Criminal Justice Section, the Coalition on Racial Ethnic Justice (COREJ) sponsored a series of town hall meetingsacross the country to investigate the issues surrounding the pipeline. The focus of these meetings was to explore these issues as they affected local communities and to gather testimony on solutions, with a particular focus on interventions where the legal community could be most effective in interrupting and reversing the pipeline. 

Report: MS-13 Foot Soldiers Use ‘Surge’ to Cross Border, ‘Colonize New Criminal Territory’
According to an immigration expert, criminal networks with Latin American roots such as MS-13 and the 18th Street gang are using the administration’s open-door policy at the border to slip in recruits that are causing a huge spike in murder and violence throughout the nation. Testifying at a House hearing on the border surge of young Latinos, the expert said “established gangs have been able to transfer an unknown number of experienced foot soldiers from Central America to help colonize new criminal territory in the United States.”

Youth Confinement in America Today
Research shows that youth confinement in America is dropping across all racial and ethnic groups. However, more than 54,000 youth are still being held in dangerous and ineffective youth prisons and correctional facilities. KIDS COUNT data show how the system is rife with racial inequalities.

President Obama Bans Solitary Confinement for Juveniles in Federal Prisons
President Obama announced a ban on the use of solitary confinement for juveniles in federal prisons. The President outlined his executive actions in an opinion piece in The Washington Post, in which he wrote that solitary confinement—especially for juveniles and people with mental illness—has the “potential to lead to devastating, lasting psychological consequences.” The President said he plans to adopt the policy recommendations outlined in a Justice Department report on the use of solitary confinement in federal prisons, including banning solitary confinement for juveniles.

Locked In: Interactions with the Criminal Justice and Child Welfare Systems for LGBTQ Youth, YMSM, and YWSW Who Engage in Survival Sex
The OJJDP-funded report describes the cycle of involvement in the juvenile justice, criminal justice, and child welfare systems affecting youth who engaged in survival sex and are self-identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth; young men who have sex with men (YMSM); and young women who have sex with women (YWSW). The report found that more than 70% of LGBTQ youth had been arrested at least once, with some experiencing violence, abuse, and disrespect when interacting with law enforcement and system stakeholders.

Services for LGBTQ Youth Having Survival Sex Are Inadequate: New Report
Most LGBTQ youth who trade sex for necessities or money they need to survive use protection to prevent sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy — but not everyone does, and not every time, says a new report from the Urban Institute. More than 60% of youth surveyed for the report always used protection, most commonly condoms. But some youth reported that they will forgo condoms if they feel safe with a partner or a friend, are forced not to use them or can make more money without protection. 

Sexual Victimization Reported by Juvenile Correctional Authorities, 2007-12
The report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics presents national estimates of sexual victimization that correctional authorities in state juvenile correctional systems and local and private juvenile correctional facilities reported from 2007 to 2012.

Survey of Sexual Violence in Juvenile Correctional Facilities, 2007-12 Statistical Tables
The Bureau of Justice Statistics report presents unweighted jurisdiction and facility counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of sexual victimization that juvenile correctional authorities reported from 2007 to 2012. Facilities include state juvenile systems, juvenile facilities in Indian country, and sampled locally and privately operated juvenile correctional facilities.

Workshops & Webinars

How Research Evidence Informs Foster Youth Medication Policies (February 22, 1 – 2:30 p.m.)
The focus of the webinar will be how mid-level policymakers in state child welfare agencies acquire, interpret, and use research evidence to develop policies regarding the use of medications for youth in foster care. Responding to the dramatic increase in the use of these medications in recent years, the federal government mandated that all state child welfare agencies develop plans to review and manage behavioral health services for youth.

Teen Dating Violence (February 23, 2 – 3:30 p.m.)
The webinar will present two studies co-funded by National Institute of Justice and the National Institutes of Health that examined the progression of dating violence between adolescence and early adulthood. Presenters will discuss how the research findings can be used to prevent the continuation of dating violence victimization.

National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS) Monthly Webinar (February 24, 2 p.m.)
Jill Head, supervisory chemist in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s Special Testing and Research Laboratory, will discuss the history of synthetic drugs, the evolution of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, and new psychoactive substances with a focus on newer fentanyls.

The National Landscape: Public Health Strategies for Effectively Preventing Violence (March 2, 2 – 3:30 p.m.)
webinar sponsored by OJJDP will provide an overview of the public health approach to violence prevention. 

Human Trafficking, Domestic Violence, and Sexual Assault: Strategies to Strengthen Community Collaboration to Respond to Survivors’ Needs (On Demand Webinar Series)
The series provides tips and tools for working with community members to combat trafficking, ensuring confidentiality and cultural competence, and working with law enforcement.

Capacity Building Webinars for Human Trafficking Service Providers (On Demand Webinar Series)
The series covers the importance of legality and confidentiality, how to communicate with survivors, ensuring their access to employment and citizenship, and helping them get housing.

Understanding the Complex Needs of Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (On Demand Webinar Series)
Presented by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Center, a four-part webinar series provides a thorough background about the service needs of commercially sexually exploited children and youth. The includes ways to address trafficked young people’s health care needs and connect them to mental health interventions. Two webinars also address the sexual exploitation of children and youth in the juvenile justice or child welfare systems. To access the free, 90-minute webinars, register with NCTSN’s Learning Center for Child and Adolescent Trauma.

Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series (On Demand)
The focus of the webinars includes strengthening mentoring practice, sharing new resources, and helping the field put research into practice. 

Career Pathways: From Ideas to Action, Tools for States (On Demand)
In recent years, states and district have been working to build career pathways that provide students with education and workforce preparation opportunities linked to additional training and jobs. The webinar described the value of career pathway systems, showcased leading state and district examples, and introduced the College and Career Readiness and Success (CCRS) Center’s new Career Pathways Modules, which provides tools and resources for the development and implementation of a career pathways system.

 

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