About Town

This Week in Historic Alexandria 4.14.16 | Newsletter | City of Alexandria

This Week in Historic Alexandria
City Museums and
Historic Sites
Other Historic Sites and Resources
This Week in Historic Alexandria
Pig Farm

On April 13, 1943, nearly ten years before the City of Alexandria annexed rural land from Fairfax County west of North Quaker lane, City Council passed an ordinance prohibiting the keeping of swine within the city boundaries.  Development to house federal workers and military personnel associated with the war effort, included in-fill housing downtown and suburban developments on the city’s second “West End” between North Quaker Lane and Del Ray, quickly eliminated public tolerance of livestock and agricultural pursuits in the rapidly growing city.
On Sale Now
Civil War Ball

On Saturday, April 30, enjoy an evening from the 1860s in the historic Gadsby’s Tavern ballroom at the Civil War Ball. The evening will include live music, dance instruction, and period desserts. Period attire, either civilian or military, is encouraged. Tickets are priced at $45 per person, in advance, as reservations are required. For more information please call 703.746.4242.

 

WHAT’S NEW IN HISTORIC ALEXANDRIA

Stabler Leadbeater Apothecary MuseumThe Historic Alexandria Foundation is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for the organization’s annual historic preservation grant projects. Projects eligible for consideration include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Restoration, repair, maintenance or improvement of historic properties with the City of Alexandria, which are open to the public or serve a public function.
  2. Conservation of artifacts in private non-profit or public museum collections within the City of Alexandria.
  3. Historical, architectural or archaeological research of a particular structure, property, site or district which may enhance the goals of preservation in the City of Alexandria.
  4. Scholarly research conducted on Alexandria’s architectural or cultural history.

For more information on the HAF grant program and application process, please click here or call 703.549.5811. The application deadline is May 1, 2016.

EVENTS
Tuesday, April 12 – Alexandria Assembly Dance Rehearsal
Gadsby’s Tavern Museum, 134 North Royal Street 
Gadsby’s Tavern Museum’s performance dance group, the Alexandria Assembly, meets most Tuesday nights for practice and instruction. Monthly donations accepted. Prerequisite: dancers must have participated in one of the Museum’s Thursday night dance class series. Free! 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more information, please call 703.746.4242.

Wednesday, April 13 – Alexandria Historical Restoration and Preservation Commission
Lloyd House, 220 North Washington Street
Regular monthly meeting.  Free! 8 a.m. For more information, please call 703.746.4554.

Thursday, April 14 – Fort Ward Interpretive Plan Committee
Lloyd House, 220 North Washington Street
Regular monthly meeting.  Free! 7:30 p.m.
For more information, please call 703.746.4554.

Ship TourThursday, April 14 – Exclusive Save Our Ship Tour
116 South Quaker Lane (old DASH bus barn)
200 years ago, early Alexandrians sunk a large ship in the Potomac mudflats adjacent to South Union Street. In 2015, archaeologists unearthed it, temporarily saving it from destruction. Now, we need your help to preserve this fragile vessel for future generations!

Special behind-the-scenes tours are being offered of our 18th-century ship, before it is moved to a conservation facility. Visitation is limitedso to make a reservation for a tour, click here and select Alexandria Archaeology Save our Ship Tours. Once the reservation is confirmed, then visit https://spring2action.razoo.com/Saveourship and make a minimum donation of $10 per person to Save Our Ship.  All proceeds benefit the ship conservation fund. Tours run every 30 minutes from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information about the ship’s excavation, stabilization, and media coverage, click here. Help us SAVE OUR SHIP! #SaveOurShipALX

Thursday, April 14 – 2nd Thursday Live: Jane Franklin Dance – Forty+
The Athenaeum, 201 Prince Street
A mixed repertory performance by Forty+ features new works by Andie Ligon de Vaulx, Emily Crews, and recent works by Jane Franklin. Andie Ligon de Vaulx’s “Just Wear a Scarf” comments on the appropriateness of suitable attire for the “well-dressed woman.” Ms. Crews’ “Dance Squared” is just that, a fun and energizing romp that twists the traditional square dance form. “Thanks and Please Pass the Potatoes” by Ms. Franklin brings up the politeness, and distance, of a polite holiday dinner. The music is by Truman Harris of Eclipse Chamber Orchestra, an Alexandria based music ensemble. $15 admission. For tickets or more information please clickhere or call 703.548.0035. To learn more about Jane Franklin Dance, please click here.

Civil War DanceThursday, April 14 – Civil War Ball Dance Classes
In preparation for the Civil War Ball on April 30th, learn the waltz, polka, Virginia Reel and more from an expert dance master. Tickets are available at $12 per person, per class, or $30 per person for the series of three sessions (April 14, 21, and 28 7, 14, 21). Reservations are recommended. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more information, please call 703.746.4242.

Friday, April 15 – Exclusive Save Our Ship Tour
116 South Quaker Lane (old DASH bus barn)
200 years ago, early Alexandrians sunk a large ship in the Potomac mudflats adjacent to South Union Street. In 2015, archaeologists unearthed it, temporarily saving it from destruction. Now, we need your help to preserve this fragile vessel for future generations!

Special behind-the-scenes tours are being offered of our 18th-century ship, before it is moved to a conservation facility. Visitation is limitedso to make a reservation for a tour, click here and select Alexandria Archaeology Save our Ship Tours. Once the reservation is confirmed, then visithttps://spring2action.razoo.com/Saveourship and make a minimum donation of $10 per person to Save Our Ship.  All proceeds benefit the ship conservation fund. Tours run every 30 minutes from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information about the ship’s excavation, stabilization, and media coverage, click here. Help us SAVE OUR SHIP! #SaveOurShipALX.

Saturday, April 16 – Exclusive Save Our Ship Tour
116 South Quaker Lane (old DASH bus barn)
Sorry, Save Our Ship tours toady are completely SOLD OUT!

Saturday, April 16 – The Lee-Fendall House to Close Early Today
Lee-Fendall House and Gardens, 614 Oronoco Street
Due to a private event, the last public tour of the historic home will be at 11 a.m.
Today

Firefighting HistorySaturday, April 16 – Firefighting History Walking Tour 
Friendship Firehouse Museum, 107 South Alfred Street 
Explore Alexandria’s firefighting history on the “Blazing a Trail: Alexandria’s Firefighting History” tour. Participants learn about volunteer firefighting in early Alexandria, three devastating fires, and the five volunteer fire companies. The tour begins at the historic Friendship Firehouse, proceeds east on Prince Street, and returns via King Street. For age 10 and older.Tickets are priced at $6 for adults, $4 for ages 10-17. Reservations are required, as space is limited. For more information, please call 703.746.4994 or 3891,

Sunday, April 17 – Music in the Gallery: MIN Flute and Guitar Duo
The Athenaeum, 201 Prince Street
Contemporary duo MIN, featuring the artistry of flutist Saïs Kamalidiin and guitarist extraordinaire Rick Peralta, perform a diverse chamber music program. Compositions performed will be selected from works by Schubert, Beethoven, Ellington, Wonder, Villa-Lobos, Coltrane, Carulli, Klugh, Musarurwa, Piazzolla, Gates, Hooker and many others. The music of MIN is representative of music styles from across America and from around the world. Expect the unexpected. Free! 2 p.m. For more information, pleasevisit www.nvfaa.org or call 703.548.0035.

Now on Exhibit – Medical Care for the Civil War Soldier  
Fort Ward Museum, 4301 West Braddock Road
See “What’s New” segment above. Free! Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.   For more information, please call 703.746.4848 or visitwww.fortward.org.

Now on Exhibit – Hotel vs. Hospital
Gadsby’s Tavern Museum, 134 North Royal Street 
Learn the story of the fine hotel industry in Alexandria and how it quickly changed after the Civil War began. The City Hotel (today part of Gadsby’s Tavern Museum at 134 North Royal Street) was the only major hotel in Alexandria to remain open during the entirety of the war.  The two other fine hotels in town, Mansion House (transformed into a massive Civil War hospital) and Marshall House (site of the first Northern and Southern deaths due to violence in the Civil War), had closed. Guests will discover how tavern keeper Samuel Heflebower was able to remain in business as he catered to the new customers arriving in Alexandria. For more information, please call 703.746.4242.

Now on Exhibit – Who These Wounded Are: The Extraordinary Stories of the Mansion House Hospital
Carlyle House Historic Park, 121 North Fairfax Street
Come see the site that inspired Mercy Street, the new PBS’ series inspired by real events that took place at Carlyle House. The six-episode program revolves around the doctors, nurses, and patients of Mansion House Hospital, a former luxury hotel owned by James Green, a prominent Alexandria businessman who resided in Carlyle House.
James Green purchased Carlyle House and the adjacent Bank of Alexandria in 1848. While living in Carlyle House with his family, he converted the Bank Building into the successful Mansion House Hotel. The hotel thrived, and Green expanded it in the 1850s. In November of 1861, the Union Army took over both the hotel and the mansion, turning the hotel into a hospital and the house into doctor and officer housing. The new exhibit recreates the days of Union occupation and tells the true stories of those who lived and worked here during the war. This is where Mercy Street really happened.  Tuesday through Saturday 10 am to 4 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m. –to 4 p.m. For further information please visit www.carlylehouse.org or call 703.549.2997.

The LyceumNow on Exhibit – The Lyceum:  175 Years of Local History
The Lyceum, Alexandria’s History Museum, 201 South Washington Street
This new exhibition highlights the history of The Lyceum, as well as its role today as a place for exploring Alexandria’s past.  On view in the museum’s Coldsmith Gallery, the historical objects and images featured represent The Lyceum, the community at work, and commemorations and celebrations.  Throughout the exhibition, visitors are invited to “be the curator” and think about why the various artifacts are in museum’s collection, and about how these tangible representatives of the past help tell the story of Alexandria’s history.

Museum visitors can also explore artifacts relating to commemorating or celebrating something important in someone’s life, or that serve as a memento representing an organization, business, or event.  For example, five World War II service medals from a local soldier are on view, as well as a china pitcher promoting William Henry Harrison’s campaign for the presidency, and a colorful hand-worked quilt commemorating the Bicentennial of the American Revolution in 1976.  The Lyceum: 175 Years of Local History includes a variety of items providing a glimpse into different types of work in Alexandria since the community was founded in the 18th century.  Objects range from circa 1796 wares marked by Alexandria silversmith Adam Lynn, a circa 1880 dresser manufactured by James F. Muir and Brothers, to a collage of original photographs – circa 1970 — documenting the Alexandria, Barcroft & Washington Rapid Transit Company.

Open Monday through Saturday 10 am to 5 p.m. and Sundays 1 to 5 p.m.   For more information call 703.746.4994, or see www.alexandriahistory.org.

Now on Exhibit – Oils and Encaustics
The Athenaeum, 201 Prince Street
Featuring the work of Georgia Nassikas.Free! Open Thursday through Sunday, 12 Noon to 4 p.m. For more information, please visit www.nvfaa.org or call 703.548.0035.

Freedmen CemeteryNow on Exhibit – Journey to Be Free: Alexandria Freedmen’s Cemetery 
Alexandria Black History Museum, 902 Wythe Street 
A new exhibit tracing the 150-year history of the long-forgotten Freedmen’s Cemetery, its rediscovery and how the new Contrabands and Freedmen’s Cemetery Memorial was created at the site.  Free, but donations are appreciated. Tuesday to Saturday: 10 am to 4 p.m., Sunday and Monday: Closed.  For more information, please call 703.746.4356.

Now on Exhibit – Their Fates Intertwined: The Lees of Alexandria in the War of 1812 
Lee-Fendall House and Gardens, 614 Oronoco Street
A new exhibit on the experiences of the Lee family in Alexandria during the War of 1812 examines the contributions of Alexandria’s citizens during the conflict that led to the writing of our national anthem through the lives of this iconic Virginia family. For more information, please visit www.leefendallhouse.org or call 703.548.1789.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply